Diffuse optical imaging


Diffuse optical imaging

Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) or diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a medical imaging modality which uses near infrared light to generate images of the body. The technique is sensitive to the optical absorption of some components of the body, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin.

Typical applications include rapid 2D optical "topographic" imaging of the Event Related Optical Signal (EROS) or Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal following brain activity and "tomographic" reconstruction of an entire 3D volume of tissue to diagnose breast cancer or neonatal brain haemorrhage. The spatial resolution of DOT techniques is several millimeters, comparable to the lower end of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The temporal resolution of EROS is very good, comparable to electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography (~milliseconds), while that of NIRS, which measures hemodynamic changes rather than neuronal activity, is comparable to fMRI (~seconds). DOT instruments are relatively low cost ($150,000), portable and immune to electrical interference. The signal-to-noise ratio of NIRS is quite good, enabling detection of responses to single events in many cases. EROS signals are much weaker, typically requiring averaging of many responses.

See also

* Photon diffusion
* Ballistic imaging
* Photon diffusion equation

External links

* [http://www.lrsm.upenn.edu/pmi Diffuse Optics Lab at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia]
* [http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/martinos/research/technologiesDOI.php DOI at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston]
* [http://www-nml.dartmouth.edu/biomedprg/biomed.html Biomedical Imaging Group at Dartmouth]
* [http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/0031-9155/50/4/R01 A review article in the field by A.P. Gibson et al.]
* [http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/27299 An article on optical breast imaging]


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