Onion ring


Onion ring
A basket of onion rings
Onion ringlets

Onion rings are a form of fast food commonly found in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and some parts of Asia. They generally consist of a cross-sectional "ring" of onion (the circular structure of which lends itself well to this mode of preparation) dipped in batter or breading and then deep fried; a variant is made with onion paste. Whole onion rings make for better presentation through a variety of sizes, while those made from a paste offer quantity through consistent size. Consumers of whole onion rings run the risk of pulling the onion out of the batter if they fail to cut it all the way through with their teeth, while onion rings made of onion paste break apart easily but oil absorbency diminishes the onion taste.

History

The exact origins of the onion ring are unknown, but in 1933 a recipe for deep-fried onion rings that are dipped in milk then dredged in flour appeared in a Crisco advertisement in The New York Times Magazine.[1]

A recipe for French Fried Onions may have appeared in the Middletown, NY Daily Times on 13 January 1910. It does not claim to be the originator of the recipe.[2]

One claimant to the invention of the onion ring is the Pig Stand restaurant chain, founded in Oak Cliff, Texas, in the early 1920s. The once-thriving chain, whose heyday in the 1940s saw over 100 locations across the United States, also claims to be the originator of Texas toast.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Crisco Advertisement". The New York Times Magazine: pp. SM18. November 6, 1933. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0B11FA3C5516738DDDAC0894D9415B838FF1D3  “Cut large onions into slices about ¼ inch thick. Separate slices into rings. Dip rings into milk. dredge with flour. … Fry onion rings until brown.”
  2. ^ The Big Apple. [1], February 11, 2007.
  3. ^ "Oak Cliff Trivia". OakCliff.com. http://www.oakcliff.com/oak_cliff_trivia.htm. Retrieved October 25, 2010. 



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Look at other dictionaries:

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