Civil service of the People's Republic of China


Civil service of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China

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Politics and government of
the People's Republic of China



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The People's Republic of China (中华人民共和国公务员) consists of civil servants of all levels who run the day-to-day affairs in mainland China.

Contents

Levels

Civil servants are found in a well-defined system of ranks. The rank of a civil servant determines what positions he/she may assume in the government or the military, how much political power he/she gets, and the level of benefits in areas such as transportation and healthcare.

According to the Temporary Regulations for National Civil Servants (国家公务员暂行条例 guó-jiā gōng-wù-yuán zàn-xíng tiáo-lì), civil servants are put into a total of fifteen levels. The levels are:

Level Post(s)
Level 1 Premier of the People's Republic of China
Levels 2-3 Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China and members of the State Council
Levels 3-4 Leading roles of ministries or equivalents (正 部级 zhèng bù-jí), or of provinces or equivalents (省级 shěng-jí)
Levels 4-5 Assisting roles of ministries or equivalents (副 部级 fù bù-jí), or of provinces or equivalents (副 省级 fù shěng-jí)
Levels 5-7 Leading roles of departments or equivalents (正 司级 / 正 厅级 zhèng sī-jí / zhèng tīng-jí), or of prefectures or equivalents (地 级 dì-jí), or counsels (巡视员 xún-shì-yuán)
Levels 6-8 Assisting roles of departments or equivalents (副 司级 fù sī-jí/ 副 厅级 fù tīng-jí), of prefectures or equivalents (副 地级 fù dì-jí), or assistant counsels (助理 巡视员 zhù-lǐ xún-shì-yuán)
Levels 7-10 Leading roles of divisions or equivalents (正 处级 zhèng chù-jí), of counties or equivalents (县级 xiàn-jí), or consultants (调研员 diào-yán-yuán)
Levels 8-11 Assisting roles of divisions or equivalents (副 处级 fù chù-jí), of counties or equivalents (副 县级 fù xiàn-jí), or assistant consultants (助理 调研员 zhù-lǐ diào-yán-yuán)
Levels 9-12 Leading roles of sections or equivalents (正 科级 zhèng kē-jí), of townships or equivalents (乡级 xiāng-jí),
Levels 9-13 Assisting roles of sections or equivalents (副 科级 fù kē-jí), of townships or equivalents (副 乡级 fù xiāng-jí)
Levels 9-14 Staff members (科员 kē-yuán)
Levels 10-15 Clerks (办事员 bàn-shì-yuán)

History

China has had a tradition of maintaining a large and well-organized civil service. In ancient times eligibility for employment in the civil service was determined by an Imperial examination system.

State Administration of Civil Service

The State Administration of Civil Service (SACS) was created in March 2008 by the National People's Congress (NPC). It is under the management of the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security (MHRSS), which resulted from the merger of the Ministry of Personnel and the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security. The function of the administration covers management, recruitment, assessment, training, rewards, supervision and other aspects related to civil service affairs. The SACS also has several new functions. These include drawing up regulations on the trial periods of newly-enrolled personnel, further protecting the legal rights of civil servants and having the responsibility of the registration of civil servants under central departments. The SACS's establishment was part of the government's reshuffle in 2008. It aimed at a "super ministry" system to streamline government department functions.

See also

Further reading

External links


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