Listed buildings in Runcorn, Cheshire


Listed buildings in Runcorn, Cheshire

Runcorn has a number of listed buildings. [cite web |url=http://www2.halton.gov.uk/content/environment/planning/forwardplanning/listedconservationareas/listedbuildings?a=5441 |title=Listed Buildings in Halton |accessdate=2007-04-19 |publisher=Halton Borough Council ] Runcorn is a town in the borough of Halton, Cheshire and its boundaries now include the village of Halton as well as the old settlements of Weston, Weston Point and Clifton.

Grade I

*Halton CastleThis consists of a ruined castle dating from from around 1070 or later. It is built from red sandstone and sits on top of high sandstone and earth mound which dominates the surrounding plain. The few high standing sections of the walls still present contain the remains of windows with tracery which suggest a late medieval alteration. The remains within the walls to the south east were built around 1800 to improve the appearance of the castle from Norton Priory. It is a scheduled ancient monument. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55981 |title=Images of England: Halton Castle |accessdate=2008-01-18 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Norton PrioryThis consists of the remains of an Augustinian Priory founded in 1115 affected by the dissolution of the monasteries of 1536. Extensive monastic ruins are present but they are only a few feet high. After the Reformation the priory became the site of a Tudor mansion house which was replaced by a Georgian house in 1730. This house was demolished in 1928. A Norman vaulted undercroft containing a high quality doorway of 1180 and a Victorian copy remain together with two blind arcades on slender shafts. The remains constitute a scheduled ancient monument. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56015 |title=Images of England: Remains of Norton Priory |accessdate=2008-01-18 |publisher=English Heritage ]

Grade II*

*Runcorn Railway BridgeThis bridge was built over the River Mersey between 1864 and 1868. It consists of iron girders on sandstone piers. The bridge is approached on both banks by arched viaducts and at each end are square towers with crenellations and machicolations. It was designed by William Baker [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56057 |title=Images of England: Runcorn railway bridge |accessdate=2008-01-18 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*All Saints Parish ChurchThis is the parish church of Runcorn which was completed in 1849. It is constructed in red sandstone with a slate roof. It has a five-bay nave with aisles and a chancel which is reduced in both width and height. The tower is at the south-west corner of the nave and has a spire. The church was designed by Anthony Salvin. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56027 |title=Images of England: Church of All Saints, Runcorn |accessdate=2008-01-18 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*St. John's Church, WestonThis is a parish church dated 1896–97. It is built in sandstone ashlar with Welsh slate roofs and has a short broach spire. It was designed by John Douglas [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56069 |title=Images of England: Parish Church of St John the Evangelist, Weston |accessdate=2008-01-18 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Christ Church and churchyard railings, Weston PointThe church and churchyard railings are dated 1841. The church is built in tooled ashlar, with ashlar dressings and Welsh slate roofs with coped gables. It is in the Early English style. The plot of the church is enclosed by a spiked wrought iron railing with curved supports and a pair of matching gates on the south side. [cite web |url=http://www2.halton.gov.uk/pdfs/environment/planning/westonlistedbuildings |title= Christ Church and churchyard railings |accessdate=2008-01-18 |last= |first= |authorlink= |coauthors= |date= |year= |month= |format=PDF |work=Listed Buildings in Halton: Weston |publisher=Halton Borough Council |pages=9 ]

*Old Hall, Halton villageThe house was rebuilt in 1693 after having been damaged in the civil war. It is built in local sandstone with a slate roof. The house is in two storeys plus an attic and has three bays. A wing of two storeys and one bay has been added to the north. The centre bay is set forward. The house has mullion windows and a studded door. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55983 |title=Images of England: The Old Hall, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Chesshyre Library, Halton villageThis was a library built for the incumbent of St Mary's Church by Sir John Chesshyre in 1730.Starkey, p. 77–78] It is built in sandstone with a slate roof. It has a single storey and is in two bays. The doorcase is surrounded by Ionic columns and a triangular pediment. The windows are arched and have glazing bars. The roof has a cornice and a solid parapet, stone gables and a chimney. Since 1975 it has been linked to the church hall and used as a meeting room. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55977|title=Images of England: The Parish Library, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Halton Vicarage, Halton villageThe Vicarage was built in 1739, also by Sir John Chesshyre. It is built in sandstone with a slate roof in two storeys with five bays. At the corners are rusticated quoins. The centre entrance bay is flanked by giant pilasters. The door has six panels and is set in a Doric porch. The ground floor windows have rusticated surrounds, including heads with keystones. The sash windows have glazing bars. The eaves consist of a cornice with a solid parapet which is pedimented over the centre bay. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55980 |title=Images of England: The Vicarage, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Seneschal's House, Halton villageThis is an 'E' shaped house dated 1598, which was formerly Halton Brow Farm House. It is built in sandstone with stone slate roof. It is in two storeys with attics and has five bays including three gabled projections. The windows have mullions. At the first floor level and above the first floor windows are moulded bands. The gables have corbels, moulded copings and sandstone ridges. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55988 |title=Images of England: The Seneschal's House, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Castle Hotel, Halton villageThis was originally a court house and is now a public house. It was built in 1737 and there have been later alterations. It is built in red sandstone with slate roof. It has two storeys and seven bays with two-bay projections on each side. The first floor entrance to the court room is approached by a stone staircase. The doorcase is surmounted by the Royal Arms. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55982 |title=Images of England: The Castle Hotel Public House, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Tricorn public houseThis a wing of a former mansion house, Hallwood, owned by Sir John Chesshyre dating from around 1710. It is now a public house. It is built in brown brick and stone with a slate roof. It is in two storeys with an attic in five bays. At the corners are stone quoins of constant width and there is a floor band. The stone doorcase is pedimented with a Doric pilaster and a six-panel door. The sash windows are recessed. [cite web |url=http://www2.halton.gov.uk/pdfs/environment/planning/haltonlistedbuildings |title= The Tricorn public house |accessdate=2008-01-19 |last= |first= |authorlink= |coauthors= |date= |year= |month= |format=PDF |work=Listed Buildings in Halton: Halton |publisher=Halton Borough Council |pages=4 ]

Grade II

Runcorn

*Holy Trinity ChurchThis parish church was built in 1838 and the chancel was added in 1857. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof. It has a rectangular five-bay nave with a west tower; the later short chancel is narrower and less lofty. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56041 |title=Images of England: Holy Trinity Church |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Hearse House, Church StreetThis originated as a hearse house dating from about 1833. It is built in red sandstone with a later blue quarry tile roof. It is a rectangular single-storey building with wide door opening which has a semi-circular arch with a keystone and springing blocks. It is now an electrical sub-station. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56028 |title=Images of England: Electricity sub-station |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Town HallThis was built as a mansion house between 1853 and 1856. Its exterior is rendered and it has a slate roof. It consists of a two-storey Italianate villa with a belvedere tower rising to four storeys. The centre bay has a Tuscan portico with an open balustrade above. The bay between the tower and the portico has a triple round-headed window with console keystones supporting a balcony with an open balustrade. At the corners are rusticated quoins and tower is fully rusticated to the first floor level. The tower has triple openings flanked by pilasters on all faces at upper level. It is now the town hall. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56029 |title=Images of England: Runcorn Town Hall |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Royal Hotel, High StreetThis is a hotel dating from the late 18th century with later alterations. It is built in brown brick with a slate roof. It has 2½ storeys with three bays to the front and a seven-bay return on the east elevation. The porch is supported by Tuscan timber columns and it has a six-panel door. The long east elevation has a sealed up opening with Tuscan columns supporting an open pediment. Further north there is a row of five ground-floor windows withrounded heads and keystones separated by rusticated piers. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56032 |title=Images of England: The Royal Hotel |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Old Police Station, Bridge StreetThis was Runcorn's first town hall which later became a police station and magistrates' court. It was built in 1831 and additions were made in 1859. The façade is of red sandstone and the rest of the building is in brick with a slate roof. The façade has two storeys and four bays with three bays set forward. These have an entrance flanked by full-height Ionic pilasters carrying a frieze and a modillion pediment. There are full rustications up to the first floor level and a moulded string course. A modillion cornice with a solid parapet supports a pediment holding a clock. The left-hand bay has twin Ionic pilasters flanking a door with stone-carved architraves. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56022 |title=Images of England: Old Police Station |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*58 High StreetThis was originally a cottage dating from the late 18th century. It is built in brown brick with a slate roof and is in two storeys and one bay. The door case has stone Tuscan columns and an open pediment. It contains a six-panel door with a patterned fanlight above. It is now used as shop. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56033 |title=Images of England: 58 High Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Carnegie LibraryThis is a purpose-built library which was constructed in sandstone with a grant from Andrew Carnegie in 1906. It includes Mackintosh-style stained glass windows. Inside is an ornate cast iron spiral staircase. [Starkey, p. 217.] It was listed in 2007.
*Walls, piers and railings, St Paul's Health CentreThese date from the late 19th century and are in stone and cast iron. The walls have banded rustication and the steps leading to the terrace are enclosed by metal railings of an original design. The metal lamp standards have moulded and capped piers. It was originally the entrance to a Methodist chapel, which is now replaced by a health centre. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=351188 |title=Images of England: Walls, piers and railings to St Paul's Health Centre |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*53 and 55 High StreetOn the left is a late 19th century building in red brick with polished granite columns flanking the entrance. The roof is parapetted. It is built in a single storey with a three-window range and a projecting entrance bay with a prostyle porch and responds in Composite order. The entablature is continuous across all ranges. Some decorative details are Gothic in manner otherwise the whole has an Italianate flavour. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=429729 |title=Images of England: National Westinster Bank |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

In the middle and on the right is a town house dating from the early 18th century. It is built in red brick withstone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys and three bays with a two-storey, two-bay wing to the west and a five-bay return to the east. At the corners are stone rusticated quoins. The door case is pedimented with Doric columns and a fluted frieze containing a six panel door. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56034 |title=Images of England: 53 and 55 High Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*71 High StreetThis is a town house dating from the late 18th century. It is built in red brick with a slate roof. It has 2½ storeys and three bays with a two-storey, one-bay wing set back to east. The house is on a stone plinth and has a stone Tuscan doorcase with an open pediment and a patterned arched fanlight above. At the first floor and second floor window-sill levels and the eaves cornice are stone bands. The windows are sashes with glazing bars but those in the central bay are false. The entrance in the east single-bay section has a Gothic-style head. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56035 |title=Images of England: 71 High Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Bridgewater HouseThis is a mansion house which was erected around 1760 for the Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in brown brick with a slate roof and consists of 2½ storeys and a basement. It is in five bays to the north-east, with an entrance, and seven bays to the northwest. It has a stone Doric doorcase withan open pediment, a six panel entrance door and a patterned arched fanlight. The entrance front has rustications up to the ground floor level, stone bands at the first and second floor sill levels and an eaves cornice with a brick parapet above. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56039 |title=Images of England: Bridgewater House |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Tide dock and lockThis consists of a tide dock and the retaining walls to a lock dating probably from 1772. It is built in sandstone blocks with some repairs in brick and concrete. The trapezoidal dock opening was originally into the River Mersey but is now into the Manchester Ship Canal. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56037 |title=Images of England: Tide dock and lock |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Waterloo BridgeThis road bridge was built over the Bridgewater Canal in 1828 with a sidewalk and a parapet added in 1886. It is constructed n red sandstone with a cast iron balustraded parapet. It has three arches with rustications and added piers with corbels supporting the footway. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56038 |title=Images of England: Waterloo Bridge |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Old Quay BridgeThis is a swing bridge which was constructed over the Manchester Ship Canal around 1894. It consists of a steel segmented arched rivetted structure with a lattice parapet, built up stanchions, cross-braces and bracing across the carriageway at a high level. The bridge is operated from the south bank by means of a hydraulic system which involves the use of a group of three slate-roofed red brick buildings, the engine house, the accumulator tower and the control building. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56040 |title=Images of England: Old Quay Bridge |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Silver Jubilee BridgeThis road bridge was built between 1956 and 1961. It consists of a single steel latticework arch. The lower surface comes to a point at either end to rest upon concrete cutwaters, the upper surface flattening out to run horizontally to either end of central span. The road surface is suspended from the arch. The span is convert|1082|ft|m|0 and the total length is convert|1628|ft|m|0. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56066 |title=Images of England: Silver Jubilee Bridge |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Brookfield Farm, 2 Weston RoadThis is a farmhouse dated 1691. It is built in stone with a brick gable and a machine-tile roof. It consists of two storeys and three bays with a wing to the north. At the first floor level is a moulded string course. An original stone mullion window is at the ground floor in the west gable. The original entrance has been filled in and a new entrance provided. The east gable is in brick. The chimney stacks are extended in brickwork above the original stone chimneys. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56042 |title=Images of England: Brookfield Farm |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*53 HollowayThis is a house dated 1779 built in brown brick with a slate roof. It has two storeys and two bays with a stone plinth and quoins. The pedimented stone doorcase has an architrave and a frieze. The entrance door is studded. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56036 |title=Images of England: 53 Holloway |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*The Elms, 4 Weston RoadThis town house dates from the mid-18th century. It is built in red brick with a slate roof and consists of two storeys and five bays which are flanked by lower two-storey single-bay wings. It has a moulded plinth and rusticated quoins. The segmental pedimented Doric doorcase has fluted pilasters and triglyphs containing a six-panel door. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56043 |title=Images of England: The Elms |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*The Nook, 5 Weston RoadThis a house dating from the mid-18th century. It is built in roughcast stone and brickwork with a slate roof in two storeys and six bays. The stone doorcase has a moulded architrave and a stone segimental arch with a keystone. The roof has a sandstone ridge. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56044 |title=Images of England: The Nook |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Rockfield, 7 Weston RoadThis house dates from the late 18th century. It is constructed in rendered brickwork with a slate roof. It has two storeys and five bays. The stone Doric doorcase has an open pediment, a six-panel door with fielded panels and a radial bar fanlight. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56045 |title=Images of England: Rockfield |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Former stables at Tricorn public houseThis building consists of the former stables of Hallwood House which date from around 1710 but which have since been altered. It is built in sandstone with a slate roof in 1½ storeys and eight bays of varying width. It has five giant Doric pilasters, two broken pedimented doorways, five sash windows with moulded stone architraves, two large window openings with Gothic heads (one of which now contains a double door), and six oval windows at a high level. There is a band at the pediment level and an eaves cornice. It is now used as a function room for the adjacent licensed premises. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55997 |title=Images of England: Former stables |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

Halton Village

*St Mary's ChurchThis is a parish church built in 1851 designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof. It has a lofty four-bay nave with side aisles and a chancel roof at a lower level. The squared rubble walls have angle buttresses to the chancel and corner buttresses to the nave. The main entrance is in the south aisle. The windows all have stained glass. The octagonal bell-turret has trefoil openings surmounted by gablets. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55979 |title=Images of England: Church of St Mary, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Gates of Chesshyre LibraryThe gate piers in the wall fronting the entrance to the Chesshyre Library dated around 1730. They are built in red sandstone squared blocks on a projecting moulded plinth with moulded caps and ball finials on truncated cone support. The finials have round projecting discs to four faces and top. The piers are set in an ashlar wall. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55978 |title=Images of England: Gate piers and surrounding walls to library, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*6, 8 and 10 Castle RoadThis a row of three cottages dating from the early 18th century with alterations since. They are constructed in sandstone with slate roofs. They have two storeys with one bay in squared coursed stone with dressed heads, sills and broad surrounds to the doors. The three-light horizontal sliding sashes have glazing bars. One chimney stack is built in stone. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55975|title=Images of England: 6, 8 and 10 Castle Road |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*12, 14 and 16 Castle RoadThis is a row of three cottages dating from the early 19th century with alterations since. They are built in brown brick with slate roofs in two storeys and one bay. They have a stone plinth, quoins, and at the first floor level a sill band. The ground floor windows have three-light horizontal sliding sashes with turning pieces and arches. The windows at the first floor level are two-light casements with shallow arches. The roof is of small slates with plain brick chimney stacks. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55976 |title=Images of England: 12, 14 and 16 Castle Road, Halton |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Norton Arms public houseThis public house is dated 1758 and built in rough-cast brickwork with a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic, and is in three bays with a two-bay two-storey wing and basement to the north. It is on a stone moulded plinth and has rusticated quoins. The stone doorcase has plain pilasters, moulded caps and an archivolt with a keystone. The entrance is aapproached up old stone steps. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55984 |title=Images of England: Norton Arms public house |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Halton House, 33 High StreetThis house dated 1779 is built in brown brick with a sandstone slate roof. It is in two storeys and three bays. The walls have rusticated stone quoins. The doorcase is in stone with eared architraves, the keystone cutting a pulvinated frieze, and a pediment with an inscribed tympanum. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55990 |title=Images of England: Halton House |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*31 High StreetThis building provided the stables to Halton House and it dates from the late 18th century. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof in two storeys and five bays. The fabric consists of squared rubble walls. The ground floor has three Gothic windows with rendered surrounds, stone sills and cast iron lattice casements. The door has six panels with a narrow rendered surround. At the first floor level is a square pitch hole which is blocked internally. The roof was raised in the 1960s and the building is now a dwelling. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55989 |title=Images of England: 31 Main Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Village Farm House, 45 Main StreetThis former farmhouse dates from the early 17th century with subsequent alterations and additions. It is built in sandstone with a slate roof in two storeys and one bay. The walls are coursed rubble. The mullion windows have leaded lights. At the first floor level and above the first floor window are string courses. A later section to the north is in random rubble. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55991 |title=Images of England: Village Farmhouse |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*Hollybank House, 51 Main StreetThis house dates from the early 18th century. It is built in rendered brick with a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic and five bays, including a blank bay over the entrance. It has a moulded stone plinth and rusticated quoins. The stone doorcase has Ionic pilasters, a pulvinated frieze and a swanneck pediment with a cartouche in the tympanum. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55992 |title=Images of England: Hollybank House |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*59, 61 and 63 Main StreetThis row of three houses dates from the early 19th century. The houses are built in red brick with a slate roof. They have two storeys and attic and, in total, seven bays. The doorcases have Tuscan columns with elliptical fanlights and rubbed arches. They contain four-panel doors with raised panels and are approached up three stone steps. The houses have a stone plinth. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55993 |title=Images of England: 59, 61 and 63 Main Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Rock Farm HouseThis former farmhouse dates from the 17th century with newer additions. It is built in sandstone with a slate roof and has mullion windows. The newer addition to the east is in brick with a slate roof. It is built on old sandstone foundations and has an arched doorway. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55985 |title=Images of England: Still Rock Farm House |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

*88, 90, 92 and 94 Main StreetThis row of four cottages is dated 1827 and is built in red brick with a slate roof. It is in two storeys and four bays with gable projections at both ends. It is built on a sandstone plinth. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55986 |title=Images of England: 88, 90, 92 and 94 Main Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*125 and 127 Main StreetThis is a pair of cottages dating from the early 17th century. They are built in sandstone and brick nogged timber framing with a machine-tile roof. They are in two storeys and three bays with an added wing to the east. The sandstone extends up to the first floor moulded string course, above which is exposed timber in small framing. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55994 |title=Images of England: 125 and 127 Main Street |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Norton Priory Lodge, 120 Main StreetThis is a former lodge to Norton Priory and is now a private dwelling. It dates from the early to mid 19th century with subsequent alterations and additions. Built in red sandstone with a slate roof, it has a single storey and is in two bays. Two-light mullion windows flank the door opening which is now built-up and has a pulvinated stone architrave. The windows are cast iron lattice casements. The eaves cornice has large stone brackets. The roof is hipped and consists of large slates with lead rolls. The chimney stack is stone. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=55987 |title=Images of England: Norton Priory Lodge |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

Weston

*Weston Old HallThis is a farmhouse dated 1607. It is built in red sandstone with a tiled roof in two storeys with an attic, and four bays including end gables which are set forward. The entrance porch, which is slightly set forward, has a Gothic opening with a drip mould. The windows have mullions, those at the attic level are filled in. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56023 |title=Images of England: The Old Hall, Weston |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage]
*Old Hall BarnThis a barn dated around 1607 with alterations to the south of the Old Hall. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof in two storeys and three bays. A single bricked-up mullion window remains at the first floor level in the west gable; all the other door and window openings are built-up in masonry or altered. The roof has gable copings and a blue tile ridge. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56024 |title=Images of England: Barn south of the Old Hall, Weston |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage]
*Manor Farm House, 134 Heath Road SouthThis is a farmhouse dating from the early 17th century. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic, and is in three bays including a gable. To the south is a single-storey one-bay extension. At the first floor level is a gable string course and there is a matching drip mould over the window in the gable apex. A single stone-mullioned window remains in the attic. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56031 |title=Images of England: Manor farm house |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Cavendish Farm HouseThis originated as farm house which is said to date from 1622, with much renewed stonework and alterations since. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof and three brick chimneys. It is in an L-plan and in two storeys with an attic. The entrance front has a doorway in the angle with the projecting wing. The wing has a string course between storeys and each storey has a ten-light double chamfered mullion window. The windows elsewhere are mostly ofthree lights and are chamfered. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56025 |title=Images of England: Cavendish Farm House, Weston |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage]
*Weston CrossThis contains the former steps to a market cross dating from the medieval period. It consists of a square base, two steps high, to which a third modern step was added when the present Celtic style cross was erected in 1960. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56030 |title=Images of England: Market Cross |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*The Grange, 98 Weston RoadThis house is dated 1766. It is built in roughcast brick with a slate roof and consists of two storeys and four bays. It is on a stone plinth and has rusticated quoins. The stone pedimented doorcase has a pulvinated frieze and a decorative inscribed tympanum. At the ground floor are two later splayed bay windows. There are stone copings to the roof gables. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56046 |title=Images of England: Weston Grange |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

Norton

*Norton Water TowerThis water tower is dated 1892. It is built in red sandstone. In shape it is cylindrical. It has a rock-faced base of convex outline which terminates in a pulvinated band. Above this there is a plain ashlar cylinder with bases for ten pilasters which rise to a frieze. The large openings are closed midway by ashlar screens with two narrow arched openings. The frieze has a Latin inscription and the dentil cornice is surmounted by an iron tank with triglyphs between pilasters. There are decorative shell upstands to the rim of the tank. Access to the tower is via a double door with six raised and fielded panels in an opening framed in stone with an elaborate stone pediment. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56013 |title=Images of England: Norton Water Tower |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Norton LodgeThis house dates from the early 18th century. It is built in brown brick with a slate roof and consists of two storeys and three bays. It is built on a stone plinth. It has a timber doorcase with a rectangular fanlight, a pulvinated frieze and a pediment which contains a six-panelled door. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56012 |title=Images of England: Norton Lodge |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Garden Loggia, Norton PrioryThis loggia dates from the late 18th century. It is built in yellow sandstone, with some brickwork, in three bays. It has two Doric columns and antae at the front of the side walls. The cornice has a fluted frieze below and a plain course above. The side walls are built of stone. The rear wall is of stone internally but of brickwork externally. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56016|title=Images of England: Garden Loggia |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]
*Ice House, Norton PrioryThe ice house to Norton Priory dates probably from the 18th century. It is built in brick under an earth mound and is beehive-shaped with the floor almost at ground level. It is approached along a short tunnel which leads into a circular domed chamber. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56017 |title=Images of England: Ice House |accessdate=2008-01-27 |publisher=English Heritage ]

Clifton

*Rocksavage House (remains)This was formerly a mansion house dated 1565 of sandstone on the site of the earlier Clifton Hall owned by Sir John Savage. Rocksavage house was replaced by a later building with the same name in the 18th century. By 1782 it was deserted and was falling into run. Now only fragments of sandstone walling indicate the position of the original house. [cite web |url=http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?pid=1&id=56026 |title=Images of England: Remains of Rock Savage |accessdate=2008-01-19 |publisher=English Heritage ]

References

Notes

Bibliography

*cite book | last =Starkey | first =H.F. | authorlink = | coauthors = | title =Old Runcorn | publisher =Halton Borough Council | date =1990 | location =Halton | pages = | url = | doi = | id = | isbn =


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