Greater Sudbury municipal election, 2003


Greater Sudbury municipal election, 2003

The Greater Sudbury municipal election, 2003 was held in the city of Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada on November 10, 2003. All municipal elections in the province of Ontario are held on the same date; see Ontario municipal elections, 2003 for elections in other cities.

The election chose the mayor and city councillors who would sit on Greater Sudbury City Council from 2003 to 2006.

Contents

Issues

The primary issue in the 2003 elections was the municipal amalgamation of 2001. Prior to January 1, 2001, the current city of Greater Sudbury consisted of seven separate municipalities, together comprising the Regional Municipality of Sudbury. On that date, the provincial government of Ontario dissolved all seven former municipalities and the regional government, merging them all into the current city government.

Under longtime mayor Jim Gordon, the preceding city council — the first to govern the amalgamated city — had struggled to pull the new city together, with soaring costs and deterioration of public services that had not been foreseen by the provincial government when the amalgamation was legislated. Voter anger was directed primarily at the provincial government of Mike Harris rather than the city council, although the council was criticized for some of the budgeting decisions it made, such as closing many municipally-owned recreational facilities.

Ward boundaries

When the current city of Greater Sudbury was created in 2001, the city was divided into six wards, each of which was represented by two councillors. This structure was controversial, as some voters felt that the division of responsibility among councillors was vague and ill-defined — it could, for example, be unclear which of the two ward councillors to approach in regards to a political issue.

In 2005, the city council adopted a new ward structure, in which the city would now be divided into twelve wards with a single councillor per ward. The new ward structure was implemented for the first time in the 2006 municipal election.

Results

Mayoral race

Incumbent mayor Jim Gordon did not run for reelection in 2003. As a result of his retirement, the mayoral race attracted an unexpectedly large field of 14 candidates. This was the second largest slate of mayoral candidates of any Ontario city in this election cycle — Toronto was the only city in the province with more candidates for mayor.

2003 Greater Sudbury municipal election, Mayor of Greater Sudburyedit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes
David Courtemanche 19,152 35.56
Paul Marleau 11,360 21.10
Colin Firth 8,096 15.03
Louise Portelance 5,645 10.48
John Caruso 4,693 8.71
Tom Boyuk 1,930 3.58
Brian R. Gatien 1,280 2.38
Richard Doyon 667 1.24
Mary Fournier Pagnutti 405 0.75
David Chevrier 271 0.50
Yvonne Neison 141 0.26
Robert Maurice 102 0.19
Ed Pokonzie 67 0.12
David Popescu 42 0.08
Total valid votes 53,851 100.00

Ward 1

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Terry Kett 5,028 31.64
(x) Eldon Gainer 4,095 25.77
Joe Cimino 3,582 22.54
(x)Gerry McIntaggart 3,187 20.05
Total valid votes 15,982

Ward 2

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Claude Berthiaume 3,815 23.99
Ron Bradley 3,679 23.13
Evelyn Dutrisac 3,067 19.28
Claude Gravelle 2,178 13.69
Carol-Ann Coupal 1,456 9.15
Bill Hedderson 1,074 6.75
Andrew Fahey 635 3.99
Total valid votes 15,904

Ward 3

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Ron Dupuis 4,355 30.69
André Rivest 3,098 21.83
Jean-Yves (John) Robert 3,065 21.60
Joe Niceforo 1,865 13.14
Robert Boileau 1,224 8.63
Maurice Sarrazin 583 4.11
Total valid votes 14,190

Ward 4

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Russ Thompson 3,315 23.57
Ted Callaghan 2,360 16.78
Rick Grylls 1,689 12.01
Daniel Gingras 1,629 11.58
Fabio Belli 1,517 10.79
Maurice Lamoureux 1,102 7.84
Tony Sharma 1,060 7.54
Jim Lanzo 1,022 7.27
Sean Peters 189 1.34
Harry Will 179 1.27
Total valid votes 14,062

Ward 5

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Doug Craig 5,226 30.05
Frances Caldarelli 3,926 22.57
Austin Davey 3,619 20.81
Jason Bubba 1,948 11.20
Fern Cormier 1,711 9.84
Neil Faddis 963 5.54
Total valid votes 17,393

Ward 6

Two to be elected.

Candidate Votes %
Janet Gasparini 3,923 25.81
Lynne Reynolds 2,642 17.38
Jim Ilnitski 2,565 16.87
Mike Petryna 2,379 15.65
Rick Villeneuve 1,552 10.21
Eric Thériault 604 3.97
Richard Madison 568 3.74
Jeff MacIntyre 411 2.70
Shawn Ouimet 294 1.93
Jerry O'Brien 263 1.73
Total valid votes 15,201

Biographical details

  • Paul Marleau became a chartered accountant in 1966, joining the firm of Thorne Riddell and becoming the firm's youngest-ever partner in 1972. He was subsequently a vice-president of Mid-Canada Communications and Northern Cable. He sold his broadcasting industry shares in 1991, and subsequently became chair of Greater Sudbury Utilities. He also chaired a review of regional government in the 1990s, which eventually led to the Regional Municipality of Sudbury's amalgamation into the current city of Greater Sudbury in 2001. He is married to Diane Marleau, who served as the Sudbury electoral district's Member of Parliament for 20 years.
  • Colin Firth was born in New Brunswick, and moved to Sudbury as a child in 1961. He initially planned to be a welder, but later moved into sales and marketing. He started publishing a "good news" and entertainment paper called South Side Story in 1993, and later started another paper called Kicks. He has also designed a beer tray for servers that was picked up by some major brands.[1] During his mayoral campaign, he promised a "corporation-wide management structure review" to allow residents to better understand the city's operations, offered a scholarship program for graduating high-school students who attend post-secondary institutions in Sudbury, and suggested town hall meetings in all city wards on a rotating basis. Firth himself organized a series of town hall candidates' meetings throughout the campaign.[2] He also supported local preference in all city contracts, and a requirement that out-of-town contractors provide at least 50% of their jobs to Sudburians.[3] He opposed going into debt to pay for infrastructural projects.[4] Late in the campaign, he promised to review the city's mandatory retirement age and set up a liaison office for senior citizens.[5] Firth was supported by Ted Szilva, a prominent local businessman.[6] After the election, he said that he would not run for office again.[7] Firth endorsed Lynne Reynolds for Mayor of Greater Sudbury in 2006.[8] He later served on the Paris Bridge Flag Project committee, which encouraged cultural groups throughout Greater Sudbury to have their flags displayed from the bridge. Seventy-one flags were raised at an event in July 2007.[9]
  • Tom Boyuk was born in Sudbury, and later operated bars, restaurants and a towing firm in the city. He argued that Sudbury suffered serious infrastructural damage in the previous decade without tax increases, and promised to improve visitors' perceptions of the city.[10] He did not favour a tax increase himself, and promised to cut the city's budget through "better money management".[11] He also promised a tax and user-fee freeze for low-income senior citizens, proposed the construction of a high-tech garbage processing facility, and favoured the deregulation of Sudbury's shopping hours.[12] Boyuk highlighted his business background, saying that he would be a promoter of small business interests.[13]
  • Brian R. Gatien is a lawyer who specializes in labour negotiations, representing employers. He criticized the state of labour relations with "public and quasi-public unions and employers" in a 1987 Northern Ontario Business article, saying that the existing structure was favoured by unions and reduced employer control.[14] As director of the Sudbury and District Chamber of Commerce in 1989, Gatien supported unemployment insurance reforms introduced by the federal government of Brian Mulroney and proposed that people living in areas of high unemployment should pay greater premiums as they are more likely use the system.[15] He was president of the Human Resources Professionals Association of Ontario (HRPAO) in 1995, and encouraged the provincial government of Mike Harris to eliminate a law banning strikebreakers, abolish the Workplace Health and Safety Agency, and review overhaul pay and employment equity laws.[16] He has also served as a director of the Member of Sudbury Arts Council and the Sudbury Symphony.[17] During the 2003 election, he delivered an address to the Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce on the implications of new federal privacy legislation for workers and employers.[18] He focused his mayor campaign on road and infrastructural repairs, and also promised to decentralize police, fire and ambulance services.[19] He also called for property tax reform, the deregulation of store shopping hours, and the creation of a "Centre for Innovative Thinking".[20] He was re-appointed to the board of the HRPAO in February 2004.[21] He was elected to the Board of the Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce in 2007, and appointed as first vice-chair shortly thereafter.[22] In July 2008, he was appointed as its chairman.[23]
  • Richard Doyon is a small business owner in the Sudbury area.[24] He first ran for Mayor of Greater Sudbury in 2000, highlighting his 17 years of business experience, and promising efficient management.[25] He also suggested that volunteers be paid minimum wage for charity work,[26] and said that he would introduce a product called "May Your Wealth Be Your Health", a scratch-and-win ticket that would allow winners to have their existing debts paid by the municipality.[27] He finished a distant third against Jim Gordon, winning about 7% of the vote.[28] He promised to run the city as a corporation during the 2003 campaign, and said that he could save $20 million in administrative costs.[29] His wife, Nicky Doyon, sought a council seat in 2000.
  • Mary Fournier Pagnutti is a Sudbury businesswoman. She started a travel agency at age 22, and later became a bookstore owner.[30] She first ran for Mayor of Greater Sudbury in 2000, with a platform that called for citizens to be involved in all aspects of municipal governance.[31] She argued, for instance, that the boundaries of the new city were chosen without adequate citizen's involvement.[32] She received about 7% of the vote, finishing a distant second against Jim Gordon.[33] In 2003, she accused rival candidates David Courtemanche and Louise Portelance of avoiding public concerns, and speaking in the elitist language of city hall.[34]
  • Yvonne "Smokey" Neison is a Sudbury businesswoman, known locally for operating a hairdressing salon and spa. She had previously campaigned for a council seat in Sudbury's fourth ward in 1994 and 1997. A Métis woman, she expressed concern about water safety and indicated that she would target the problem of elder abuse.[35] Neison was a member of the board of directors of the Greater Sudbury Woodland Metis Tribe at the time of the election, and had previously served on the Nickel Centre Credit Union.[36]
  • Eldon Gainer is a retired elementary school principal. He was first elected to the Walden council in 1980, and became its deputy mayor in 1985. The latter position also gave him a seat on the Regional Council.[37] He chaired the region's corporate services committee just prior to the amalgamation of Greater Sudbury in 2000.[38] Gainer was elected to the Greater Sudbury council in the 2000 election, winning a seat in the city's first ward, and was re-elected in 2003. He was chosen as the city's deputy mayor for budgets in early 2001, and was reassigned as the budget co-chair during his second term.[39] He supported a water plant upgrade, and indicated that the city's 2001 capital budget was targeted to the most pressing infrastructural needs.[40] Gainer also served on the Police Services Board, and was chosen as its chair in 2005.[41] He favoured allowing stores to stay open for longer hours, and questioned the need for photo radar to monitor traffic violations.[42] In addition to his municipal duties, Gainer served on the province's public appointments secretariat for Science North.[43] He did not seek re-election in 2006.

References

  1. ^ Stephen Beaumont, "New serving tray hits the spot with advertisers, restaurateurs", Toronto Star, 29 July 1992, B3; "A beer tray that sells", Globe and Mail, 15 December 1992, B4; Lara Bradley, "Can-do attitude carries Firth: Maverick mayoral candidate a proud 'cheerleader for Sudbury'", Sudbury Star, 30 October 2003, A1.
  2. ^ "Mayoral candidates invited to discussion forums", Sudbury Star, 16 October 2003, A5.
  3. ^ Bob Vaillancourt, "City needs new blood", Sudbury Star, 24 September 2003, A3.
  4. ^ Bob Vaillancourt, "Mayoral candidates talk roads, God", '"Sudbury Star, 18 October 2003, A1.
  5. ^ "Greater Sudbury needs seniors' liaison office, Firth says", Sudbury Star, 7 November 2003, A11.
  6. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Martin promise could be windfall for city", Sudbury Star, 1 October 2003, A3.
  7. ^ Carol Mulligan, "Marleau offers support to Courtemanche: 'We bring a lot to the table'", Sudbury Star, 11 November 2003, A5.
  8. ^ Colin Firth, "Reynolds clearly the best candidate" [letter], Sudbury Star, 14 November 2006, A11.
  9. ^ "Appropriate tribute" [editorial], Sudbury Star, 2 July 2007, A10.
  10. ^ Bob Vaillancourt, "Businessman announces bid for mayor's job", Sudbury Star, 26 July 2003, A3.
  11. ^ Bob Vaillancourt, "Candidates ready to pave over debt policy", Sudbury Star, 6 October 2003, A1.
  12. ^ Bob Vaillancourt, "Candidates debate seniors' issues", Sudbury Star, 31 October 2003, A3; "Boyuk pushes garbage plant", Sudbury Star, 31 October 2003, A5; Harold Carmichael, "Closed for business", Sudbury Star, 1 November 2003, B1.
  13. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Tommy Boyuk", Sudbury Star, 27 October 2003, A1.
  14. ^ Michael Swan, "Workers, Bosses Find Harmony", Northern Ontario Business, November 1987, p. 3.
  15. ^ Linda Diebel, "Jobless plan last straw hard-hit Sudbury says", Toronto Star, 6 September 1989, A13.
  16. ^ Margot Gibb-Clark, "Group urges repeal of Ontario labour law", Globe and Mail, 14 July 1995, B3.
  17. ^ Carol Mulligan, "Experience would be a negative", Sudbury Star, 28 October 2003, A1.
  18. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Chamber seminar focuses on new privacy legislation", Sudbury Star, 24 September 2003, A12; Harold Carmichael, "Privacy law impacts businesses, charities, Sudbury chamber told", Sudbury Star, 26 September 2003, A12.
  19. ^ Rob O'Flanagan, "'Just watch me,' says mayoral candidate", Sudbury Star, 25 September 2003, A3; "Gatien would double city's road spending", Sudbury Star, 15 October 2003, A5.
  20. ^ Rob O'Flanagan, "Let stores regulate hours, Gatien says", Sudbury Star, 30 October 2003, A5; "Courtemanche promises 'collaborative leadership'", Sudbury Star, 5 November 2003, A5; "Poll encouraging", Sudbury Star, 8 November 2003, A5.
  21. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Sudbury lawyer elected to board", Sudbury Star, 25 February 2004, A10.
  22. ^ "New members elected to Chamber board", Sudbury Star, 7 June 2007, A3; "Chamber elects president", Sudbury Star, 27 June 2007, B7.
  23. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Gatien new chamber chairman", Sudbury Star, 12 July 2008, D1.
  24. ^ Harold Carmichael, "Gordon `deserved to win,' rival says", Sudbury Star, 14 November 2000, A8. The article title does not refer to Doyon.
  25. ^ Chris Polehoykie, "Gordon promises to cut taxes in new city", Sudbury Star, 20 October 2000, A1; Denis St. Pierre, "Tax hike predicted for some townships", Sudbury Star, 24 October 2000, A1. Doyon was 43 years old at the time. See ""Election Forum", Sudbury Star, 11 November 2000, C1.
  26. ^ Chris Polehoykie, "Candidates a sincere, but inexperienced, group", Sudbury Star, 12 November 2000, A3.
  27. ^ Chris Polehoykie, "Garbage hot topic at mayoral debate", Sudbury Star, 31 October 2000, A1.
  28. ^ Denis St. Pierre, "Lots of upsets in ward races", Sudbury Star, 14 November 2000, A1.
  29. ^ Harold Carmichael, "$20M in savings possible, says Doyon", Sudbury Star, 20 October 2003, A3.
  30. ^ Lara Bradley, "Candidate takes campaign to the streets", Sudbury Star, 21 October 2003, A3.
  31. ^ Chris Polehoykie, "Gordon promises to cut taxes in new city", Sudbury Star, 20 October 2000, A1. She was 45 years old at the time. See "Election Forum", Sudbury Star, 11 September 2000, C1.
  32. ^ Denis St. Pierre, "Tax hike predicted for some townships", Sudbury Star, 24 October 2000, A1.
  33. ^ Lara Bradley, "Candidate takes campaign to the streets", Sudbury Star, 21 October 2003, A3.
  34. ^ Laura Stradiotto, "Mayoral candidate blasts debate", Sudbury Star, 7 November 2003, A3.
  35. ^ Rob O'Flanagan, "Candidates face young people", Sudbury Star, 22 October 2003, A1l; Laura Stradiotto, "Water, elder abuse concerns Neison", Sudbury Star, 23 October 2003, A3.
  36. ^ "Yvonne `Smokey' Neison", NorthernLife.ca, 4 November 2003, accessed 11 September 2008.
  37. ^ Kim-Dominique Plouffe, "Gainer, McIntaggart to work together", Sudbury Star, 14 November 2000, A8; "Three deputy mayors appointed by council", Sudbury Star, 21 January 2002, A3.
  38. ^ Terry Pender, "Region backs off change in purchasing", Sudbury Star, 24 September 1999, A1; Rob O'Flanagan, "$3.4-M windfall a `bonus' for region", Sudbury Star, 21 June 2000, A1.
  39. ^ "Craig is city's new deputy mayor", Sudbury Star, 11 January 2001, A3; Dave Courtemanche, "Budget calls for input and tough decisions", Sudbury Star, 19 January 2004, A7.
  40. ^ Denis St. Pierre, "Councillor fears support lacking for city's water plant upgrade", Sudbury Star, 15 March 2001, A1; Denis St. Pierre, "Spending to focus on `worst areas'", 15 May 2001, A1.
  41. ^ Denis St. Pierre, "Police board objectivity questioned", Sudbury Star, 16 July 2001, A3; Laura Stradiotto, "Gainer to lead police board", Sudbury Star, 25 January 2005, A3.
  42. ^ Trevor Wilhelm, "Group calls on city to let stores stay open later", Sudbury Star, 15 May 2003, A1; Bob Vaillancourt, "City rejects request for longer store hours", Sudbury Star, 14 November 2003, A1; Bob Vaillancourt, "Council set to debate store hours ... again", Sudbury Star, 21 June 2004, A1; Keith Leslie, "Ont. cities to get red-light cameras and keep cash from the fines: Takhar", Sudbury Star, 10 August 2004.
  43. ^ Public Appointments Secretarist, Province of Ontario, accessed 29 March 2008.

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