Nigeria national football team


Nigeria national football team
Nigeria
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Super Eagles, Green Eagles
Association Nigeria Football Federation
Sub-confederation WAFU (West Africa)
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Head coach Stephen Keshi
Captain Joseph Yobo
Most caps Nwankwo Kanu (87)[1]
Top scorer Rashidi Yekini (37)
Home stadium Abuja Stadium
FIFA code NGA
FIFA ranking 44
Highest FIFA ranking 5 (April 1994)
Lowest FIFA ranking 82 (November 1999)
Elo ranking 41
Highest Elo ranking 5 (31 May 2004)
Lowest Elo ranking 87 (27 December 1964)
Home colours
Away colours
First international
_Sierra_Leone_0–2_Nigeria_Ng westafricasettlements.png Sierra Leone 0–2 Nigeria Nigeria
(Freetown, Sierra Leone; 10 August 1949)[2]
Biggest win
Nigeria Nigeria 10–1 Dahomey 
(Lagos, Nigeria; 28 November 1959)
Biggest defeat
 Gold Coast 7–0 Nigeria Nigeria
(Accra, Gold Coast; 1 June 1955)
World Cup
Appearances 4 (First in 1994)
Best result Round of 16, 1994 & 1998
African Nations Cup
Appearances 16 (First in 1963)
Best result Winners, 1980 & 1994
Confederations Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 1995)
Best result 4th, 1995
Olympic medal record
Men’s Football[3]
Gold 1996 Atlanta Team
Silver 2008 Beijing Team

The Nigeria national football team, nicknamed the Super Eagles or Green Eagles, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF). The team has ranked as high as 5th in the FIFA World Rankings, in April 1994. They won a gold medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics and the Africa Cup of Nations on two occasions, and have reached the FIFA World Cup finals four times.

Contents

History

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
1962 Did not qualify
1966 Withdrew
1970 to 1990 Did not qualify
1994 Round of 16 ? 4 2 0 2 7 4
1998 Round of 16 ? 4 2 0 2 6 9
2002 Group Stage ? 3 1 0 2 1 3
2006 Did not qualify
2010 Group Stage ? 3 0 1 2 3 5
Total 4/13 14 5 1 8 17 21

After playing other colonies in unofficial games since the 1930s,[4] Nigeria played its first official game in October 1949, while still a British colony. The team played warmup games in England against various amateur teams like Dulwich Hamlet, Bishop Auckland and South Liverpool. The team's first major success was a gold medal in the 2nd All-Africa games, with 3rd place finishes in 1976 and 1978's African Cup of Nations to follow. In 1980 the team had such players as Leyton Orient's John Chiedozie and Tunji Banjo, and the Muda Lawal / Christian Chukwu-led Super Eagles won the Cup for the first time in Lagos. In 1984 and 1988, Nigeria reached the Cup of Nations final, losing both times to Cameroon. Three of the four African titles won by Cameroon have been won by defeating Nigeria. Missing out to Cameroon on many occasions has created an intense rivalry between both nations. Two notable occasions; narrowly losing out on qualification for 1990 World Cup and then the controversial final of the 2000 African Nations Cup where a goal scored by Victor Ikpeba during a penalty shoot out was disallowed by the referee[citation needed].

1994 World Cup

Nigeria finally reached the World Cup for the first time in the 1994 FIFA World Cup. They were managed by Clemens Westerhof. Nigeria topped its group which included Argentina, Bulgaria, and Greece. In its first game Nigeria defeated Bulgaria 3–0, lost to Argentina 1–2, and qualified for the second round after a 2–0 victory over Greece. In the second round Nigeria played Italy and took the lead with a goal from Amunike at 25 min. Nigeria were within two minutes of qualifying for the Quarter finals of 1994 World Cup in the game against Italy but Roberto Baggio scored to take the game to extra time. He also scored the eventual winning goal.

1998 World Cup

In 1998 Nigeria returned to the World Cup alongside Cameroon, Morocco, Tunisia, and South Africa. Optimism was high due to its manager Bora Milutinović and the return of most 1994 squad members. In the final tournament Nigeria were drawn into group D with Spain, Bulgaria, Paraguay. Nigeria scored a major upset by defeating Spain 3–2 after coming back twice from being 1–0 and 2–1 down. The Eagles qualified for the second round with a win against Bulgaria and a loss to Paraguay. The team's hopes of surpassing its 1994 performance was shattered after a 1–4 loss to Denmark.

2002 & 2006 World Cups

The 2002 FIFA World Cup in Korea and Japan, saw Nigeria again qualify with optimism. With a new squad and distinctive pastel green kits the Super Eagles were expected to build on its strong performances in the 2000 and 2002 African Cup of Nations. Nigeria were drawn into group F with powerhouses Sweden, Argentina, and England. The first game against Argentina started with a strong defence that kept the first half scoreless. In the 61st minute Gabriel Batistuta breached the Nigerian defense to put Argentina in the lead 1–0 and win the game. Nigeria's second game against Sweden saw them take the lead but later lose 2–1. Nigeria then drew 0–0 with England and bowed out in the first round.

Nigeria missed out on qualification for the 2006 World Cup after finishing level on points in the qualification group with Angola, but having an inferior record in the matches between the sides.

2010 World Cup

On 14 November 2009, Nigeria qualified for the 2010 World Cup after defeating Kenya by 3–2 in Nairobi.[5]

Nigeria lost its opening match against Argentina 1–0 at Ellis Park Stadium following a Gabriel Heinze header in the 6th minute.[6] In its second game Nigeria led early on by a goal from Kalu Uche. A red card against Sani Kaita gave Greece the advantage. Greece scored the equalizer late in the first half and Nigeria conceded the second goal in the second half and lost the game 2–1. They then drew 2–2 with South Korea and failed to qualify for the next round. On 30 June 2010, following its early exit and poor showing, the President of Nigeria Goodluck Jonathan suspended the national football team from international competition for two years.[7] This suspension put the team at risk of being banned from international football by FIFA for reasons of political interference.[8] On 5 July 2010, the Nigerian government rescinded its ban of the national football team from FIFA/CAF football competitions,[9] but the sanction of suspension was applied by FIFA some three months after.[10] On October 4, 2010, Nigeria was indefinitely banned from international football due to government interference following the 2010 World Cup.[10] Four days later, however, the ban was "provisionally lifted" until 26 October, the day after the officially unrecognised National Association of Nigerian Footballers (NANF) dropped its court case against the NFF.[11]


12 June 2010
16:00
Argentina  1–0  Nigeria Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg
Attendance: 55,686
Referee: Wolfgang Stark (Germany)
Heinze Goal 6' Report

17 June 2010
16:00
Greece  2–1 Nigeria  Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
Attendance: 31,593
Referee: Óscar Ruiz (Colombia)
Salpigidis Goal 44'
Torosidis Goal 71'
Report Uche Goal 16'

2010-06-22
20:30 UTC+2
Nigeria  2–2  South Korea Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban
Attendance: 61,874
Referee: Olegario Benquerenca (Portugal)
Uche Goal 12'
Yakubu Goal 69' (pen.)
Report Lee Jung-Soo Goal 38'
Park Chu-Young Goal 49'


Teamv · d · e
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Argentina 3 3 0 0 7 1 +6 9
 South Korea 3 1 1 1 5 6 −1 4
 Greece 3 1 0 2 2 5 −3 3
 Nigeria 3 0 1 2 3 5 −2 1


African Nations Cup

Nigeria won the African Nations Cup twice (1980 and 1994). More recently they took third place at the 2002 African Nations Cup, the 2004 African Nations Cup, the 2006 African Nations Cup, and the 2010 African Nations Cup.

Recent results

Coaching staff

Position Name
Manager Stephen Keshi
Assistant Manager Daniel Amokachi
Assistant Manager Valere HoaundinouTogo
Coach Sylvanus Okpala
Goalkeeping Coach Ike Shorunmu

Current squad

The following players were called up to the Nigeria squad for the November 2011 friendlies vs. Botswana and Zambia. Caps and goals current as of November 12, 2011.[12]

# Pos. Player Date of Birth (Age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Austin Ejide April 8, 1984 (1984-04-08) (age 27) 21 0 Israel Hapoel Petah Tikva
16 GK Vincent Enyeama August 29, 1982 (1982-08-29) (age 29) 63 1 France Lille
20 GK Chigozie Agbim November 28, 1984 (1984-11-28) (age 26) 0 0 Nigeria Warri Wolves
2 DF Joseph Yobo (Captain) September 6, 1980 (1980-09-06) (age 31) 81 6 Turkey Fenerbahçe
3 DF Taye Taiwo April 16, 1985 (1985-04-16) (age 26) 51 5 Italy Milan
4 DF Uwa Elderson Echiéjilé January 20, 1988 (1988-01-20) (age 23) 15 0 Portugal Sporting Braga
5 DF Dele Adeleye December 25, 1988 (1988-12-25) (age 22) 10 0 Ukraine Tavriya Simferopol
6 DF Chibuzor Okonkwo December 16, 1988 (1988-12-16) (age 22) 8 0 Nigeria Heartland
13 DF Efe Ambrose October 18, 1988 (1988-10-18) (age 23) 10 0 Israel Ashdod
18 DF Gege Soriola November 21, 1988 (1988-11-21) (age 22) 0 0 South Africa Free State Stars
22 DF Ugo Ukah January 18, 1984 (1984-01-18) (age 27) 0 0 Poland Widzew Łódź
DF Ayila Yussuf November 4, 1984 (1984-11-04) (age 27) 31 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
7 MF Mikel John Obi April 22, 1987 (1987-04-22) (age 24) 37 2 England Chelsea
8 MF Chinedu Obasi June 1, 1986 (1986-06-01) (age 25) 19 2 Germany 1899 Hoffenheim
9 MF Ahmed Musa October 14, 1992 (1992-10-14) (age 19) 12 1 Netherlands VVV-Venlo
11 MF Joel Obi May 22, 1991 (1991-05-22) (age 20) 10 0 Italy Internazionale
19 MF Fegor Ogude July 29, 1987 (1987-07-29) (age 24) 7 0 Norway Vålerenga
24 MF Kalu Uche November 15, 1982 (1982-11-15) (age 29) 31 3 Switzerland Neuchâtel Xamax
27 MF Nnamdi Oduamadi October 17, 1990 (1990-10-17) (age 21) 0 0 Italy Torino
MF Dickson Etuhu June 8, 1982 (1982-06-08) (age 29) 18 0 England Fulham
12 FW Ikechukwu Uche January 5, 1984 (1984-01-05) (age 27) 33 12 Spain Granada
14 FW Peter Odemwingie July 15, 1981 (1981-07-15) (age 30) 54 9 England West Bromwich Albion
15 FW Emmanuel Emenike May 10, 1987 (1987-05-10) (age 24) 5 1 Russia Spartak Moscow
23 FW Victor Obinna March 25, 1987 (1987-03-25) (age 24) 44 11 Russia Lokomotiv Moscow
26 FW Ekigho Ehiosun May 12, 1989 (1989-05-12) (age 22) 5 1 Turkey Samsunspor
28 FW Ideye Aide Brown October 10, 1988 (1988-10-10) (age 23) 4 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
FW Edward Ofere March 28, 1986 (1986-03-28) (age 25) 0 0 Italy Lecce
FW Victor Moses December 12, 1990 (1990-12-12) (age 20) 0 0 England Wigan Athletic
FW Jude Aneke April 23, 1990 (1990-04-23) (age 21) 0 0 Nigeria Kaduna United

Recent callups

The following players have also been called up to the Nigeria squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of Birth (Age) Caps Goals Club Latest Callup
GK Dele Aiyenugba November 20, 1983 (1983-11-20) (age 27) 17 0 Israel Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv v.  Guinea, Oct. 7, 2011 (ACNQ)
DF Danny Shittu September 2, 1980 (1980-09-02) (age 31) 32 0 England Queens Park Rangers v.  Madagascar, Sept. 4, 2011 (ACNQ)
DF Yusuf Mohamed November 5, 1983 (1983-11-05) (age 28) 11 0 Sudan Al-Hilal v.  Ethiopia, June 5, 2011 (ACNQ)
DF Michael Odibe July 23, 1988 (1988-07-23) (age 23) 1 0 Ukraine Arsenal Kyiv v.  Sierra Leone, February 9, 2011 (Friendly)
DF Abdulwasiu Showemimo October 10, 1988 (1988-10-10) (age 23) 1 0 Nigeria Kano Pillars v.  Sierra Leone, February 9, 2011 (Friendly)
MF Emmanuel Ekpo December 20, 1987 (1987-12-20) (age 23) 1 0 United States Columbus Crew v.  Ghana, October 11, 2011 (Friendly)
MF Solomon Okoronkwo March 2, 1987 (1987-03-02) (age 24) 4 0 Norway Aalesund v.  Madagascar, Sept. 4, 2011 (ACNQ)
MF Nosa Igiebor November 9, 1990 (1990-11-09) (age 21) 0 0 Israel Hapoel Tel Aviv v.  Madagascar, Sept. 4, 2011 (ACNQ)
MF Isaac Promise December 2, 1987 (1987-12-02) (age 23) 0 0 Turkey Manisaspor v.  Ethiopia, June 5, 2011 (ACNQ)
MF Oluwafemi Ajilore January 18, 1985 (1985-01-18) (age 26) 5 0 Denmark Brøndby v.  Sierra Leone, February 9, 2011 (Friendly)
MF Osas Okoro September 11, 1991 (1991-09-11) (age 20) 1 0 Nigeria Heartland v.  Sierra Leone, February 9, 2011 (Friendly)
MF Julius Ubido December 29, 1984 (1984-12-29) (age 26) 1 0 Nigeria Heartland v.  Sierra Leone, February 9, 2011 (Friendly)
FW Peter Utaka February 12, 1984 (1984-02-12) (age 27) 8 3 Denmark OB v.  Ghana, October 11, 2011 (Friendly)
FW Victor Anichebe April 23, 1988 (1988-04-23) (age 23) 10 1 England Everton v.  Madagascar, Sept. 4, 2011 (ACNQ)
FW Shola Ameobi October 12, 1981 (1981-10-12) (age 30) 0 0 England Newcastle United v.  Ethiopia, June 5, 2011 (ACNQ)
FW Obafemi Martins October 28, 1984 (1984-10-28) (age 27) 37 18 Russia Rubin Kazan v.  Kenya, March 29, 2011 (Friendly)

Managers

  • John Finch (1949)
  • Elliot Williams (1954–1956)
  • Les Courtier (1956–1960)
  • Jerry Beit haLevi (1960–1961)
  • George Vardar (1961–1963)
  • Jorge Penna (1963–1964)
  • Daniel Anyiam (1964–1965)
  • József Ember (1965–1968)
  • Peter 'Eto' Amaechina (1969–1970)
  • Karl-Heinz Marotzke (1970–1971)
  • Jorge Penna (1972–1973)
  • Karl-Heinz Marotzke (1974)
  • Tihomir 'Tiki' Jelisavčić (1974–1978)
  • Otto Glória (1979–1982)
  • Gottlieb Göller (1981)
  • Festus Onigbinde (1983–1984)
  • Chris Udemezue (1984–1986)
  • Patrick Ekeji (1985)
  • Paul Hamilton (1987–1989)
  • Manfred Hoener (1988–1989)

Top goalscorers

List of Nigeria's top ten highest ever international goalscorers. Players in bold still eligible for selection.

Goal scored Player name
37 Rashidi Yekini
23 Segun Odegbami
21 Yakubu Aiyegbeni
18 Obafemi Martins
17 Sunday Oyarekhua
14 Daniel Amokachi
14 Jay-Jay Okocha
14 Julius Aghahowa
13 Nwankwo Kanu
13 Samson Siasia

FIFA World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did Not Enter
Italy 1934
France 1938
Brazil 1950
Switzerland 1954
Sweden 1958
Chile 1962 Did Not Qualify
England 1966 Withdrew
Mexico 1970 Did Not Qualify
West Germany 1974
Argentina 1978
Spain 1982
Mexico 1986
Italy 1990
United States 1994 Round of 16 9th 4 2 0 2 7 4
France 1998 Round of 16 12th 4 2 0 2 6 9
South Korea Japan 2002 Group Stage 27th 3 0 1 2 1 3
Germany 2006 Did Not Qualify
South Africa 2010 Group Stage 27th 3 0 1 2 3 5
Brazil 2014 To Be Determined
Russia 2018
Qatar 2022
Total Round of 16 4/19 14 4 2 8 17 21



References

  1. ^ Mamrud, Roberto; Stokkermans, Karel. "Players with 100+ Caps and 30+ International Goals". RSSSF. http://www.rsssf.com/miscellaneous/century.html. Retrieved 4 February 2011. "Mudashiru Lawal played 86 matches for Nigeria and was considered record holder before, but his total includes more than 13 unofficial matches." 
  2. ^ Courtney, Barrie. "Sierra Leone – List of International Matches". RSSSF. http://www.rsssf.com/tabless/sier-intres.html. Retrieved 4 November 2010. 
  3. ^ In the era of Nigeria's Olympic successes, the tournament has been restricted to squads with no more than three players over 23 years of age, and these matches are not usually regarded as part of the national team's record
  4. ^ http://www.tribune.com.ng/27122009/news/sports7.html Nigeria's First Football Captain
  5. ^ "Kenya 2–3 Nigeria". ESPN. 2009-11-14. http://soccernet.espn.go.com/report?id=262945&cc=5739. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  6. ^ "Argentina 1–0 Nigeria". BBC. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/world_cup_2010/matches/match_04/default.stm. Retrieved 14 June 2010. 
  7. ^ "Nigeria president suspends team". BBC Sport. 2010-06-30. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/world_cup_2010/8777118.stm. Retrieved 2010-06-30. 
  8. ^ Adigun, Bashir; Gambrell, Jon (30 June 2010). "Nigeria's president suspends soccer team". USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/sports/soccer/2010-06-30-2295293910_x.htm. Retrieved 30 June 2010. 
  9. ^ "Nigerian government rescinds ban". ESPN Soccernet. 2010-07-05. http://soccernet.espn.go.com/world-cup/story/_/id/806158/ce/uk/?cc=5739&ver=global. Retrieved 2010-07-0. 
  10. ^ a b "Fifa issues world ban to Nigeria". BBC News. 4 October 2010. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/africa/9060018.stm. 
  11. ^ "Fifa lifts Nigeria's suspension". BBC Sport. 8 October 2010. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/africa/9075312.stm. Retrieved 2010-10-08. 
  12. ^ Enyeama, Etuhu get Nigeria recalls

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