Hautes-Alpes


Hautes-Alpes

Infobox_Department_of_France
department=Hautes-Alpes|number=05
region=Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
prefecture=Gap
subprefectures=Briançon
population=121,419|pop_date=1999|pop_rank=98th|density=22
area=5549|area_scale=9
arrond=2|cantons=30|communes=177
president=Jean-Yves Dusserre|pres_party=UMP
img_coa=Blason dpt fr HautesAlpes.svg

Hautes-Alpes (Occitan: "Auts Aups") is a department in southeastern France named after the Alps mountain range.

History

Hautes-Alpes is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It consists of the southeast of the former province of Dauphiné and the north of Provence.

Napoleon passed through Gap when he returned to reclaim France after his exile on Elba.

Geography

The department is surrounded by the following French departments: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Drôme, Isère, and Savoie. Italy borders it on the east.

Hautes-Alpes is located in the Alps mountain range. The average elevations is over 1000 m, and the highest elevation is over 4000 m. The only three sizable towns are Gap, Briançon, and Embrun, which was the subprefecture until 1926.

The third highest commune in all of Europe is the village of Saint-Véran. Gap and Briançon are the highest prefecture and subprefecture in France.

The following rivers flow through the department:
* Durance
* Guisane
* Buëch
* Drac
* Clarée
* Séveraisse

The Durance has been dammed to create the largest artificial lake in Europe: the Lac de Serre-Ponçon.

The Queyras valley is located in the eastern part of the department and is noted by many as being an area of outstanding beauty.

Demographics

The inhabitants of the department are called "Haut-Alpins".

The extremely mountainous terrain explains the sparse population, which was originally about 120,000. It changed little during the 19th century, but fell to about 85,000 after World War I. Thanks in large part to tourism, the population has risen from 87,436 in 1962 to 121,419 in 1999, principally in the town of Gap.

Tourism

The tourist industry is largely dependent on skiing in winter. In summer the Alpine scenery and many outdoor activities attract visitors from across Europe(sailing, hiking, climbing and aerial sports such as gliding). The Tour de France passes through the department regularly. This draws many cycling fanatics to cycle the cols and watch the race.

ee also

*Cantons of the Hautes-Alpes department
*Communes of the Hautes-Alpes department
*Arrondissements of the Hautes-Alpes department

External links

* [http://www.hautes-alpes.com/ Official Website]
* [http://www.hautes-alpes.pref.gouv.fr/ Prefecture website]
* [http://www.cg05.fr/ General Council webstite]
* [http://www.mont-dauphin.com/ A village in the French Alps built by Vauban]


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hautes-Alpes — Administration Pays …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hautes-alpes — Le département des Hautes Alpes[1] est un département français de la région Provence Alpes Côte d Azur. L Insee et la Poste lui attribuent le code 05. Hautes Alpes …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hautes Alpes — Le département des Hautes Alpes[1] est un département français de la région Provence Alpes Côte d Azur. L Insee et la Poste lui attribuent le code 05. Hautes Alpes …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hautes-Alpes — Region Proven …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hautes-Alpes — 5 520 km²; 113 300 hab.; ch. l. Gap (35 647 hab.); Hautes Alpes Alpes françaises …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Hautes-Alpes — (spr. otsálp), franz. Departement, s. Alpes …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Hautes-Alpes —   [ot zalp], Département in Südfrankreich, Region Provence Alpes Côte d Azur, am Oberlauf der Durance in den Dauphiné Alpen, 5 549 km2, 121 000 Einwohner; Verwaltungssitz ist Gap.   …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Hautes-Alpes — (spr. ōt sálp ), s. Oberalpen …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Hautes-Alpes — Sp Aukštutinės Álpės Ap Hautes Alpes L Prancūzijos departamentas …   Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

  • Hautes-Alpes — /oht zannlp /, n. a department in SE France. 97,358; 2179 sq. mi. (5645 sq. km). Cap.: Gap. * * * …   Universalium


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