Vestibule (architecture)


Vestibule (architecture)

A vestibule (pronEng|ˈvɛstɨbjuːl) is a lobby, entrance hall, or passage between the entrance and the interior of a building.

The same term can apply to structures in modern or ancient roman architecture. In modern architecture "vestibule" typically refers to a small room or hall between an entrance and the interior of the building or house. In Roman architecture, "vestibule" (Latin: vestibulum) referred to a partially enclosed area between the interior of the house and the street.Vestibule. "The Oxford English Dictionary." [http://www.oed.com http://www.oed.com] Online edition, December 2006]

Modern usage

In contemporary usage, a vestibule constitutes an area surrounding the exterior door. It acts as an ante-chamber between the exterior and the interior structure. Often it connects the doorway to a lobby or hallway. It is the space one occupies once inside the door, but not yet into the main interior of the building.

Although vestibules are common in private residences as a modified mud room, they are especially prevalent in buildings designed to elicit a sense of grandeur, such as government buildings. The residence of the White House in the United States is just such an example. It contains a vestibule between the entrance at the North portico and the main interior hall. Many government buildings mimic the classical architecture from which the vestibule originates.

Railroad use

The vestibule on a railroad passenger car is an enclosed area at the end of the carbody, usually separated from the main part of the interior by a door, which is power-operated on most modern equipment. Entrance to and exit from the car is through the side doors, which lead into the vestibule. When passenger cars are coupled, their vestibules are joined by mating faceplate and diaphragm assemblies to create a weather-tight seal for the safety and comfort of passengers who are stepping from car to car.

Ancient usage

Vestibules were common in ancient Greek temples. Due to the construction techniques available at the time, it was not possible to build large spans. Consequently many entrance ways had two rows of columns that supported the roof and created a distinct space around the entrance. [cite web
last =Tarbel
first =F.B.
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =A History of Ancient Greek Art.
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url =http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/history-of-ancient-greek-art-9.asp
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In ancient Roman architecture, the origin of the term, a vestibule was a space between the interior of a building and the street. The structure was a mixture between a modern hall and porch. Upon entering a Roman house or domus, one would have to pass through the vestibule before entering the atrium. [cite web
last =McManus
first =Barbara
authorlink =
coauthors =
title =Sample Plan of a Roman House
work =VRoma
publisher =The College of New Rochelle
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url =http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/house.html
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accessdate = 3-2-2006
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From the fifth century vestibules were used in Christian churches in both the east and west. [CathEncy|wstitle=Vestibule (Porch)]

ee also

*Propylaeum
* at Wiktionary

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

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