Acclamation


Acclamation

An acclamation, in its most common sense, is a form of election that does not use a ballot. "Acclamation" or "acclamatio" can also signify a kind of ritual greeting and expression of approval in certain social contexts in ancient Rome.

Voting

The most frequent type of acclamation is a voice vote, in which the voting group is asked who favors and who opposes the proposed candidate. In the event of a lack of opposition, the candidate is considered elected.

This form of election is most commonly associated with papal elections (see Acclamation in papal elections), though this method was discontinued by Pope John Paul II's apostolic constitution "Universi Dominici Gregis" . It is also sometimes found in the context of parliamentary decisions, or United States presidential nominating conventions.

In Canada, a candidate for a parliamentary, legislative or municipal position is said to be elected by acclamation if he or she has no opponents for the seat, an eventuality that rarely occurs except for legislative elections in the northern territories and municipal elections. The last instance of an acclamation in an election to the Canadian House of Commons was in 1957 when George Henry Doucett was acclaimed in a by-election following the death of his predecessor William Gourlay Blair. [cite web|url=http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Parlinfo/Compilations/HouseOfCommons/ElectedByAcclamation.aspx|title=Elected by acclamation|work=Electoral Results|publisher=Parliament of Canada|accessdate=2008-06-24]

At general meetings in listed companies in Sweden, shareholders often vote by acclamation.

Religion

In liturgical Christian Churches, the Acclamations are the opening sentences at the beginning of the Eucharist.

In ancient Rome

Acclamations were ritual verbal expressions of approval and benediction in public (e.g. the gladiatorial games) and private life. The departure and return of imperial magistrates was, for example, accompanied by acclamation. In the later empire, these vocal expressions of goodwill were reserved for the emperor and certain relatives, who were greeted in this manner during public appearances on special occasions such as their birthdays. By the 4th century AD, acclamations were compulsory for high-level imperial officials.

ee also

*Walkover

References


* John N. Wall. "A Dictionary for Episcopalians". Cambridge, MA: Cowley Publications, 2000.
* Citation
last = Badian
first = Ernst
author-link =
contribution = acclamation
editor-last = Hornblower
editor-first = Simon
title = Oxford Classical Dictionary
volume = 1
pages = 3
publisher = Oxford University Press
place = Oxford
year = 1996
contribution-url =


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  • acclamation — [ aklamasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1504; lat. acclamatio, de acclamare 1 ♦ (Surtout au plur.) Cri collectif d enthousiasme pour saluer qqn ou approuver qqch. « La salle tremblait encore d acclamations » (Hugo). Son retour fut salué par des acclamations. ⇒… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Acclamation — • Used in the classical Latin of Republican Rome as a general term for any manifestation of popular feeling expressed by a shout Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Acclamation     Acclamation …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Acclamation — Ac cla*ma tion, n. [L. acclamatio: cf. F. acclamation.] 1. A shout of approbation, favor, or assent; eager expression of approval; loud applause. [1913 Webster] On such a day, a holiday having been voted by acclamation, an ordinary walk would not …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • acclamation — ► NOUN ▪ loud and enthusiastic approval or praise. ● by acclamation Cf. ↑by acclamation …   English terms dictionary

  • acclamation — [ak΄lə mā′shən] n. 1. an acclaiming or being acclaimed 2. loud applause or strong approval 3. a vote by voice; esp., an enthusiastic approving vote without an actual count [elected by acclamation] acclamatory [ə klam′ə tôr΄ē] adj …   English World dictionary

  • Acclamation — (v. lat.), 1) Zuruf des Beifalls, z.B. bei den Römern bei Triumphzügen, Reden, neuen Gesetzen, bei der Wahl eines neuen Imperators, bei einer Kaiserwahl etc., ja in der ältern christlichen Kirche bis zum 12. Jahrh. sogar bei Predigten berühmter… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Acclamation — Acclamation, heißt auch bei Papst u. Bischofwahlen das Stimmen Aller für Einen Candidaten, ohne daß vorher eine Stimmensammlung stattgefunden hat …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Acclamation — Acclamation, Zuruf, Wahl durch Zuruf …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • acclamation — index consensus, mention (tribute) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • acclamation — (n.) 1540s, from L. acclamationem (nom. acclamatio) a calling, exclamation, shout of approval, noun of action from pp. stem of acclamare shout approval or disapproval of, cry out at, from ad toward (see AD (Cf. ad )) + clamare cry out (see CLAIM… …   Etymology dictionary

  • acclamation — acclaim, *applause, plaudits Ana, Ant & Contrasted words: see those at ACCLAIM n …   New Dictionary of Synonyms


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