Hurricane Dora (1999)


Hurricane Dora (1999)

Infobox Hurricane
Name=Hurricane Dora
Type=hurricane
Year=1999
Basin=EPac
Image location=Hurricane Dora 1999.gif


Formed=August 6, 1999
Dissipated=August 23, 1999
1-min winds=120
Pressure=943
Da

Inflated=
Fatalities=None reported
Areas=Hawaii, Johnston Atoll
Hurricane season=1999 Pacific hurricane season

Hurricane Dora was the longest-lasting tropical cyclone of the 1999 Pacific hurricane season. The fourth named storm, third hurricane, and second major hurricane of the season, Dora developed on August 6 from a tropical wave to the south of Mexico. It maintained a steady westward track for much of its lifetime, reaching peak winds of 140 mph (220 km/h) on August 12 and August 13. Dora lasted for a total of 17 days before dissipating on August 23 to the north of Wake Island in the western Pacific Ocean.cite web|author=Miles B. Larwence|year=1999|title=NHC Report on Dora|publisher=National Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-27|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1999dora.html]

Although it never made landfall, Dora produced high surf, gale force winds and light rain across southeastern Hawaii and Johnston Island. There was no reported deaths or injuries from the hurricane.

Meteorological history

The precursor of Dora was a tropical wave that moved off the coast of Africa on July 23. The system moved across the Atlantic Ocean without development, and on August 4 it crossed Central America into the eastern Pacific Ocean with some disorganized convection. A low-level circulation developed the next day as banding features increased, and early on August 6 it became Tropical Depression Four-E while located about 335 miles (540 km) south of Acapulco. Despite some initial vertical wind shear, the depression steadily intensified, and received the name "Dora" by the National Hurricane Center after attaining tropical storm status late on August 6.cite web|author=Miles B. Larwence|year=1999|title=NHC Report on Dora|publisher=National Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-27|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1999dora.html]

Moving westward along a decaying subtropical ridge, Dora steadily increased to hurricane status on August 8, based on estimates through the Dvorak technique. Weak wind shear ahead of the storm and warm waters allowed continued strengthening as a small, well-defined eye formed. On August 12, Dora reached its peak intensity of 140 mph (220 km/h) as the barometric pressure dropped to a minimum of 943 mbar. Shortly after its peak intensity, Dora underwent an eyewall replacement cycle, resulting in a brief weakening before again restrengthening to winds of 140 mph (220 km/h) late on August 13. Dora never strengthened any further as the storm encountered cooler waters and light wind shear.cite web|author=Gary Padgett|title=Gary Padgett's report on Hurricane Dora|accessdate=2006-11-28|url=http://australiasevereweather.com/cyclones/2000/summ9908.txt] cite web|author=Beven|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #29|publisher=National Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-28|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.029.html]

Subsequent to peaking in intensity, Dora encountered cooler waters and increased wind shear. On August 14 it crossed into the central Pacific Ocean as a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale; the duty of hurricane warnings were transferred from the National Hurricane Center to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Dora again encountered favorable conditions, and on August 15 re-intensified to major hurricane status as it passed 200 miles (320 km) south of Big Island, Hawaii. The secondary peak intensity was brief, as weakening occurred after the forward speed increased. Dora passed 65 miles (105 km) south of Johnston Island on August 18 before turning west-northwest, and on August 19 it crossed the International Date Line as a 70 mph (115 km/h) tropical storm; the Joint Typhoon Warning Center tracked the remainder of the duration of Dora. The storm encountered stronger wind shear, and by August 21 winds decreased to below tropical storm force. On August 23, the circulation became exposed from the main convection, and at 1800 UTC Tropical Depression Dora dissipated about 450 miles (725 km) northeast of Wake Island.cite web|author=Beven|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #33|publisher=National Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-28|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.033.html]

Impact and records

On August 16, forecast models predicted Dora would bypass Johnston Island a short distance to the south, with some concerns of a direct hit on the island.cite web|author=Habuzel|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #44|publisher=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-29|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.044.html] cite web|author=Habuzel|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #45|publisher=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-29|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.045.html] cite web|author=Habuzel|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #46|publisher=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-29|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.046.html] cite web|author=Habuzel|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #48|publisher=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-29|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.048.html] As a result of the threat, about 1,200 workers and residents evacuated Johnston Atoll to Hawaii. Prior to leaving, workers secured construction equipment and other loose items. Some biologists on Johnston Atoll were concerned that the hurricane would severely impact the reproductive cyclone of over 150,000 birds in the Johnston Atoll Wildlife Refuge, a concern expressed after Hurricane John in 1994 killed 80% of the bird population during its impact on Johnston Atoll. [cite web|author=Mary Adamski|year=1999|title=Hurricane evacuees start arriving in Hawaii|publisher=Star-Bulletin|accessdate=2007-04-20|url=http://starbulletin.com/1999/08/17/news/story3.html] Additionally, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center predicted Dora would strike Wake Island as a minimal typhoon, though it did not occur.

An ocean swell from Dora produced 8 — 20 foot (2 — 6 m) waves along the east and southern shores of the island of Hawaii. This prompted local officials to close all beaches, campsites and nature trails in the Puna and Kau districts due to the deteriorating conditions.cite web|author=National Climatic Data Center|year=1999|title=Event Report for Hawaii|accessdate=2007-07-17|url=http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~354203] The outer rainbands produced produced winds of up to 60 mph (95 km/h) at some high elevations, and also resulted in some light rainfall.cite web|author=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|year=1999|title=The 1999 Central Pacific Hurricane Season|accessdate=2007-07-17|url=http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc/summaries/1999.php#dora] Hurricane Dora also produced rough surf on Johnston Island, with one forecaster remarking the surf was the most severe aspect of the storm. [cite web|author=Rosendal|title=Hurricane Dora Tropical Discussion Archive #50|publisher=Central Pacific Hurricane Center|accessdate=2006-11-30|url=http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/1999/dis/NEP0799.050.html] The automatic station at Johnston Atoll reported wind gusts between 40 — 45 mph (75 — 85 km/h) for two hours. Overall effects were minimal, and there were no reports of damage or injuries.

With a total track of 6,500 miles (10,500 km), Hurricane Dora had the second longest track of a Pacific hurricane, behind only Hurricane John of 1994; the length of the track of Dora was more than four times the basin average. [cite web|author=Neal Dorst|year=2004|title=FAQ: What is the farthest a tropical cyclone has traveled|publisher=NOAA|accessdate=2007-04-23|url=http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/E7.html] Dora was also the first Pacific hurricane to come close enough to be detected by radar. [cite web|author=Andy Nash|year=2003|title=Hurricane Jimema report|publisher=NOAA|accessdate=2007-04-23|url=http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc/summaries/2003/jimena/jimena.php] In addition, the hurricane was the first tropical cyclone to move across all three Pacific basins since John in 1994.The name Dora was not retired, and was used again in 2005.

ee also

* List of Pacific hurricanes

References

External links

* [http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1999dora.html Hurricane Dora Tropical Cyclone Report]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hurrikan Dora (1999) — Kategorie 4 Hurrikan (SSHS) Hurrikan Dora zum Zeitpunkt seiner stärksten Intensität …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 1999 Pacific hurricane season — Infobox hurricane season Basin=EPac Year=1999 Track=1999 Pacific hurricane season map.png First storm formed=June 18, 1999 Last storm dissipated=October 11, 1999 Strongest storm name=Dora Strongest storm winds=120 Strongest storm pressure=943… …   Wikipedia

  • 1999 Pacific typhoon season — Infobox hurricane season Track=1999 Pacific typhoon season summary.jpg Basin=WPac Year=1999 First storm formed=January 3, 1999 Last storm dissipated=December 16, 1999 Strongest storm name=Bart Strongest storm pressure=898 Strongest storm… …   Wikipedia

  • Pazifische Hurrikansaison 1999 — Alle Stürme der Saison Bildung des ersten Sturms 18. Juni 1999 Auflösung des letzten Sturms 11 …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tropical Storm Dora — The name Dora has been used for two tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, and five tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. It was used in the Atlantic before the formal naming system was instituted; though it was later retired in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Tropischer Sturm Dora — Hurrikan Dora (1999) Kategorie 4 Hurrikan (SSHS) Hurrikan Dora zum Zeitpunkt seiner stärksten Intensität Entst …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Pazifische Taifunsaison 1999 — Alle Stürme der Saison Bildung des ersten Sturms 4. Januar 1999 Auflösung des letzten Sturms …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 1993 Pacific hurricane season — Infobox hurricane season Basin=EPac Year=1993 Track=1993 Pacific hurricane season map.png First storm formed=June 11, 1993 Last storm dissipated=October 14, 1993 Strongest storm name=Lidia Strongest storm winds=130 Strongest storm pressure=930… …   Wikipedia

  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season — Infobox hurricane season Basin=EPac Year=2005 Track=2005 Pacific hurricane season map.png First storm formed=May 17, 2005 Last storm dissipated=October 20, 2005 Strongest storm name=Kenneth Strongest storm pressure=947 Strongest storm winds=115… …   Wikipedia

  • Atlantic hurricane season — Tracks of all known Atlantic tropical cyclones from 1851 to 2005 For the current season, see 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is the period in a year when hurricanes usually form in the Atlantic Ocean. Tropical… …   Wikipedia


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.