Vandalism Act (Singapore)


Vandalism Act (Singapore)

The Vandalism Act 1966 was originally passed to curb the spread of communist graffiti in Singapore during the period following Singaporean independence.

Destroying or damaging any public property without the written authority of government officials, statutory boards or armed forces lawfully present in Singapore are in violation of the terms of the Act.

Furthermore, any damages to private property are illegal under the Act without the written consent of the owner or occupier.

References

ee also

*Criminal law of Singapore
*Law of Singapore
*Michael P. Fay


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