Agriculture in Brazil


Agriculture in Brazil

Brazil is endowed with vast agricultural resources. There are two distinct agricultural areas. The first, comprised of the southern one-half to two-thirds of the country, has a semi-temperate climate and higher rainfall, the better soils, higher technology and input use, adequate infrastructure, and more experienced farmers. It produces most of Brazil's grains and oil seeds and export crops. The other, located in the drought-ridden northeast region and in the Amazon basin, lacks well-distributed rainfall, good soil, adequate infrastructure, and sufficient development capital. Although mostly occupied by subsistence farmers, the latter regions are increasingly important as exporters of forest products, cocoa, and tropical fruits. Central Brazil contains substantial areas of grassland with only scattered trees. The Brazilian grasslands are less fertile than those of North America and are generally more suited for grazing.

The history of agriculture in Brazil in the colonial period and beyond is intertwined with the history of slavery in Brazil. Since the abolition of slavery in 1888 by the Lei Áurea ("Golden Law"), the practice of forced labour ("trablho escravo") has remained commonplace in agriculture. [ [http://www.oit.org.br/trabalho_forcado/ "Combating Forced Labour", ILO Programme (United Nations)] - in Portuguese] [Le Breton, B. (2003). "Trapped: modern-day slavery in the Brazilian Amazon". Kumarian Press. ISBN 1565491556]

During the dictatorship period, agriculture was neglected and exploited as a means of resources for the industry sector and cheap food for the urban population. Until late 1980s export and prices were controlled, with quotas on exports. This has changed since the early 1990s.(citation needed)

Brazilian agriculture is well diversified, and the country is largely self-sufficient in food. Agriculture accounts for 8% of the country's GDP, and employs about one-quarter of the labor force in more than 6 million agricultural enterprises. Brazil is the world's largest producer of sugarcane and coffee, and a net exporter of cocoa, soybeans, orange juice, tobacco, forest products, and other tropical fruits and nuts. Livestock production is important in many parts of the country, with rapid growth in the poultry, pork, and milk industries reflecting changes in consumer tastes. On a value basis, production is 60% field crop and 40% livestock. Brazil is a net exporter of agricultural and food products, which account for about 35% of the country's exports.(citation needed)

Half of Brazil is covered by forests, with the largest rain forest in the world located in the Amazon Basin. Recent migrations into the Amazon and large scale burning of forest areas have placed the international spotlight on the country and damaged Brazil's image. The government has reduced incentives for such activity and is beginning to implement an ambitious environmental plan - and has just adopted an Environmental Crimes Law that requires serious penalties for infractions.(citation needed)

Brazil is biggest exporter of coffee, soybeans, beef, sugar cane, ethanol and frozen chickens. [ [http://www.newsweek.com/id/148928/page/2 Brazil Surges Ahead with Commodities Wealth | Newsweek International Edition | Newsweek.com ] ]

Agriculture - products:coffee, soybeans, wheat, rice, corn, sugarcane, cocoa, citrus; beef

Cattle

Productivity per hectare has surged 61% since 1990 but production remains highly concentrated on the state of Rio Grande do Sul, which grows on average 48% all rice in Brazil. [http://www.agricultura.gov.br/pls/portal/url/ITEM/213229F7DBD76D9CE040A8C075024B3C]

Soybean

References

ee also

* Economic history of Brazil
* History
* Industry in Brazil
* Economy of Brazil
* Geography
* Transportation


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Brazil nut — Conservation status Vulnerable (IUCN 2.3) …   Wikipedia

  • BRAZIL — BRAZIL, South American federal republic; general population (est.) 183 million (2005); Jewish population 97,000. Jewish history in Brazil is divided into four distinct periods with a specific interval: (a) The presence of new christians and the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Brazil — • Information includes history, religion, climate, education, and economy Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Brazil     Brazil     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Brazil cost — (Portuguese: Custo brasil) refers to the increased operational costs associated with doing business with Brazil,[1] making Brazilian goods more expensive compared to other countries.[2] There are several factors that contribute to the extra cost …   Wikipedia

  • Agriculture and Food Supplies — ▪ 2007 Introduction Bird flu reached Europe and Africa, and concerns over BSE continued to disrupt trade in beef. An international vault for seeds was under construction on an Arctic island. Stocks of important food fish species were reported… …   Universalium

  • brazil — /breuh zil /, n. brazilwood. [1350 1400; ME brasile < ML < It < Sp brasil, deriv. of brasa live coal (the wood being red in color) < Gmc; see BRAISE] * * * Brazil Introduction Brazil Background: Following three centuries under the rule of… …   Universalium

  • Brazil — Brazilian /breuh zil yeuhn/, adj., n. /breuh zil /, n. a republic in South America. 164,511,366; 3,286,170 sq. mi. (8,511,180 sq. km). Cap.: Brasília. Portuguese and Spanish, Brasil. Official name, Federative Republic of Brazil. * * * Brazil… …   Universalium

  • Brazil — Infobox Country native name = República Federativa do Brasil conventional long name = Federative Republic of Brazil common name = Brazil symbol type = Coat of arms national motto = Ordem e Progresso pt icon Order and Progress national anthem =… …   Wikipedia

  • AGRICULTURE — in the land of israel in prehistory from the beginning of the bronze age to the conquest of joshua early israelite the period of the first temple the period of the return and the second temple the hasmonean period the mishnaic and talmudic period …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Agriculture — General …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.