Royal Canadian Mint Olympic coins


Royal Canadian Mint Olympic coins

=1976 Montreal Summer Games=

Most numismatists agree that the first true numismatic collection was the Olympic Five and Ten Dollar coins for the 1976 Montreal Olympics. Starting in February 1973, the RCM engaged in a very ambitious program. At the behest of the Federal Government, led by then-Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, it was agreed that these coins would help finance while commemorate the 1976 Summer Olympics.

The plan was to have thirty coins, twenty-eight silver coins with face values of $5 and $10, and two gold coins. This would signify the first time that the RCM issued coins with face values of $5 and $10. These coins would be categorized into seven series with each series configured into four coin sets (two five dollar coins and two ten dollar coins) [Striking Impressions, James A. Haxby, 1983, p.234, ISBN 0-660-91234-1] . The seven series were constituted as follows:

* Geographic
* Olympic Motifs
* Early Canadian Sports
* Olympic Track and Field Sports
* Olympic Summer Sports
* Olympic Team and Body Contact Sports
* Olympic Souvenirs

A key highlight of these coins were the standardized designs and the unique finishes. All 28 coins were styled in a similar fashion. The top aspect of the coin had the Olympic logo, its denomination, and the wording in the same spot. [Striking Impressions, James A. Haxby, 1983, p.232, ISBN 0-660-91234-1] The finishes consisted of two different styles that had never been used on Canadian coinage. The first finish was a satin or frosted effect which adorned the coin. The second finish was a proof finish, which consisted of frosted lettering and a design set off against a brilliant mirror field. The RCM had to obtain special equipment to achieve the desired finish. [Striking Impressions, James A. Haxby, 1983, p.234, ISBN 0-660-91234-1]

1988 Calgary Winter Games

Heading into the 1980s, the Olympics would return to Canada. The city of Calgary would host the 1988 Winter Olympics. Starting in 1985, the Federal Government, under the leadership of then-Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, issued a ten coin set to help finance and commemorate the Olympic games. In similar style to the Montreal Olympics, the RCM would introduce coins with a face value that had never been used before. Said coins would feature a $20 face value. These coins were issued in Proof quality only, and were sold with the partnership of the Royal Bank of Canada. Unlike the Montreal coins, mintage was limited to 5,000,000 coins and this would mark the first time that any silver coin had edge lettering on it. Said lettering was 'XV OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES - JEUX D'OLYMPIQUES D'HIVER.' [Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, 60th Edition, W.K. Cross, 2006. p.354, ISBN 0-88968-297-6] There are existing varieties that have missed the edge lettering process. [ The Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, 60th Anniversary Edition, W.K. Cross, p. 354, The Charlton Press, 2006, ISBN 0-88968-297-6 ]

The Olympic Centennial

The International Olympic Committee decided to commemorate the Centennial of the Olympic Games by issuing a coin set. This was a collaborative effort with five Mints contributing coins. The first three coins were issued by the RCM in 1992. The other Mints included Austria, Australia, France, and Greece.

Two of the coins were silver with a face value of $15 while the third coin was gold and had a face value of $175. The $15 coins were sold individually or in a set. The individual coins were packaged in a burgundy leatherette case while the set was featured in a wooden display case. Both $15 coins featured lettering on its edge: CITIUS, ALTIUS, FORTIUS. [Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, 60th Edition, W.K. Cross, 2006. p.349, ISBN 0-88968-297-6] The $175 coin featured a Certificate of Authenticity signed by Juan Antonio Samaranch. The lettering on its edge was the same as the lettering found on the silver coins.

2010 Vancouver Winter Games

A partnership has already been struck with the Canadian Olympic Committee to produce commemorative coins for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. The 2010 Winter Olympics will mark the third time that the Royal Canadian Mint will be involved with commemorative coins for an Olympic event being hosted in Canada. Just like Montreal and Calgary, the Royal Canadian Mint will be introducing a new denomination to the Vancouver Olympic coins. The non-circulating legal tender commemorative coins will have a face value of $25, a Canadian first. [”Olympic commems to sport $25 face”, Canadian Coin News, p.1, Bret Evans, January 9 to 22, 2007] On the circulating coins, it is also notable that name 'Canada' has been moved to the obverse; this has necessitated removing the phrase 'D G Regina' from beside the Queen's portrait.

Olympic coins

1976 Montreal Olympics

Series 1

Series 4

Series 7

One Hundred Dollar Gold

First Strikes

All of these coins were also made available at Petro-Canada service stations, encapulated on a credit card-sized card. Many pressings of the Alpine Skiing coin released to Petro-Canada stations and to special 2010 Winter Olympic "coin boards" in October 2007 were the victim of a pressing error called a mule, with a 2008 obverse accidentally minted rather than the expected 2007. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, an estimated 40,000 Petro-Canada "sports cards" and 10,000 "coin board" sets were released with the error before it was caught. A similar mule occurred with the Wheelchair Curling issue, with an obverse featuring the standard Vancouver 2010 logo being used instead of the Paralympic logo. Both coins subsequently found demand in the collectors market. ["Catching the mule, again", Bret Evans, Canadian Coin News, November 27 to December 10, 2007, p. 1.]
*2008 Four different Olympic commemoratives are planned for circulation.

pecial Edition Coin rolls

* As these rolls were sold directly from the Royal Canadian Mint in a special red paper wrapping, they were guaranteed in Uncirculated Condition. The rolls were sold at a premium price of $16.95 each, despite having a face value of ten dollars.

Two Hundred and Fifty Dollars

Specifications

Mascot Coins

References

ee also

*Modern Olympic coins
*Modern Olympic Coins (2000-present)
*Modern Winter Olympic coins

External links

* [http://www.mint.ca Royal Canadian Mint's Official Website]
* [http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/R-9/text.html Royal Canadian Mint Act]
* [http://www.canadian-numismatic.org/ Royal Canadian Numismatic Association]
* [http://www.nunetcan.net Numismatic Network Canada]
* [http://www.canadiancoinnews.ca/ Canadian Coin News]


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