Wheelwright


Wheelwright

A wheelwright (or wainwright) is a person who builds or repairs wheels. Making and balancing a wheel is skilled work.This occupational name eventually became the English surname "Wheelwright".

Historically, these tradesmen made wheels for carts and wagons by first constructing the hub, the spokes and the rim/fellows segments and assembling them all into a unit working from the center of the wheel outwards. Most wheels were made from wood but other materials have been used, such as bone and horn, for decorative or other purposes. Around the middle of the 19th century iron strakes were replaced by a solid iron tire custom made by a blacksmith who first measured each wheel to ensure proper fit. Strakes were lengths of iron that were nailed to the outside of wheels to hold wooden wheels together. Strakes were replaced around the mid-1800s by more dependable iron tires that were fastened to the wooden wheel by both the tight fit of the tire/band as well as tire-bolts. Tire-bolts were less likely than tire-nails to break off because they were flush with the wheel's outer surface. During the second half of the 19th century the use of pre-manufactured iron hubs, and other factory-made wood, iron and rubber wheel parts became increasingly common.

In modern times, wheelwrights continue to make and repair a wide variety of wheels, including those made from wood and banded by iron tires. The word wheelwright remains a term usually used for someone who makes and repairs wheels for horse drawn vehicles, even though it is sometimes used to refer to someone who repairs wheels, wheel alignment, rims, drums, discs and wire spokes on modern vehicles such as automobiles, buses and trucks. Wheels for horse-drawn vehicles continue to be constructed and repaired for use by people who use horse-drawn vehicles for farming, Equine (horse) competitions, and presentations of historical events such as reenactments and living history.

The three books commonly accepted as authoritative on the subject of wheelwrighting are "Wheelwrighting : A Modern Introduction" by Bruce Morrison and Joyce Morrison, and "Wheelmaking: Wooden Wheel Design and Construction", Don Peloubet (Editor), as well as a difficult to acquire book called "The Secrets of Wheelwrighting: Tyres" by M.C. Hendrikson.

ee also

* Wheelbuilding
* Cartwright
* Traveling Forge

References

cite book
last = Morrison
first = Bruce
authorlink =
coauthors = Joyce Morrison
title = Wheelwrighting : A Modern Introduction
publisher = Cottonwood Press
date = 2003
location -
pages = 371 (Spiral-bound)
url = http://www.astragalpress.com/wheelwrighting.htm
doi =
id = ISBN 0973194707

cite book
last = Peloubet (Editor)
first = Don
authorlink =
coauthors =
title = Wooden Wheel Design and Construction
publisher = Carriage Museum of America
date = 1996
location - KY
pages = 248 (paper)
url = http://www.carriagemuseumlibrary.org/booksale.htm
doi =
id = ISBN 1879335735, ISBN-13: 978-1879335738

cite book
last = Sturt
first = George
authorlink =
coauthors =
title = The Wheelwright's Shop
publisher = Cambridge University Press
date = 1923
location -
pages =
url =
doi =
id = ISBN 0-521-09195-0

cite book
last = Hendrikson
first = M.C.
authorlink =
coauthors =
title = The Secrets of Wheelwrighting: Tyres
publisher = M.C. and P. Hendrikson. Kariong, N.S.W.
date = 1996
location - Australia
pages =
url =
doi =
id = ISBN 0-646-31201-4

cite book
last = Wright
first = John
authorlink =
coauthors = Robert Hurford
title = Making a wheel, how to make a traditional light English pattern wheel
publisher = Natural England Countryside Agency
date = 1997
location - UK
pages =
url = http://www.countryside.gov.uk/LAR/archive/publications/makingawheel.asp
doi =
id = ISBN 1869964578


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wheelwright — Wheelwright …   Wikipedia Español

  • Wheelwright — Wheelwright, KY U.S. city in Kentucky Population (2000): 1042 Housing Units (2000): 236 Land area (2000): 1.742557 sq. miles (4.513202 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.742557 sq. miles (4.513202 …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Wheelwright, KY — U.S. city in Kentucky Population (2000): 1042 Housing Units (2000): 236 Land area (2000): 1.742557 sq. miles (4.513202 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.742557 sq. miles (4.513202 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Wheelwright — Wheel wright , n. A man whose occupation is to make or repair wheels and wheeled vehicles, as carts, wagons, and the like. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wheelwright — (spr. Uihirit), William, geb. zu Newburyport im Staate Massuchusetts, ging erst nach Brasilien, dann nach der Westküste Südamerikas, wo er 1833 die Pacific Dampfschifffahrts Compagnie gründete, welche ihm in Chili u. Peru privilegirt wurde, dann… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • wheelwright — ► NOUN chiefly historical ▪ a person who makes or repairs wooden wheels …   English terms dictionary

  • wheelwright — [hwēl′rīt΄, wēl′rīt΄] n. [see WHEEL & WRIGHT] a person who makes and repairs wheels and wheeled vehicles …   English World dictionary

  • wheelwright — UK [ˈwiːlˌraɪt] / US [ˈwɪlˌraɪt] / US [ˈhwɪlˌraɪt] noun [countable] Word forms wheelwright : singular wheelwright plural wheelwrights someone in the past whose job was to make or repair wooden wheels …   English dictionary

  • Wheelwright — Recorded in the spellings of Wheelwright, Wheelright, and originally Whelewryghte, this is a very English occupational surname.Describing a skilled maker of wheeled vehicles and probably members of the ancient Guild of Wheelwrights, it is like… …   Surnames reference

  • wheelwright — [[t](h)wi͟ːlraɪt[/t]] wheelwrights N COUNT A wheelwright is someone who makes and repairs wooden wheels and other wooden things such as carts, carriages, and gates …   English dictionary


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