Black Sea Region


Black Sea Region

The Black Sea Region ( _tr. Karadeniz Bölgesi) is one of Turkey's seven census-defined geographical regions.

Provinces

* Amasya Province
* Artvin Province
* Bartın Province
* Bayburt Province
* Bolu Province
* Çorum Province
* Düzce Province
* Giresun Province
* Gümüşhane Province
* Karabük Province
* Karasu Province
* Kastamonu Province
* Ordu Province
* Rize Province
* Samsun Province
* Sinop Province
* Tokat Province
* Trabzon Province
* Zonguldak Province

Population

The Black Sea region's population is 8,439,213 based on the 2000 census. 4,137,166 people live in cities and 4,301,747 people in villages. This makes it the only one of the seven regions of Turkey in which more people live in rural rather than urban areas. The population growth rate is 3.65‰, the lowest rate among all regions in Turkey. [http://www.byegm.gov.tr/yayinlarimiz/kitaplar/turkiye2003/content/english/78-79.htm]

Geography

The Black Sea region has a steep, rocky coast with rivers that cascade through the gorges of the coastal ranges. A few larger rivers, those cutting back through the Pontic Mountains (Doğu Karadeniz Dağları), have tributaries that flow in broad, elevated basins. Access inland from the coast is limited to a few narrow valleys because mountain ridges, with elevations of 1,525 to 1,800 meters in the west and 3,000 to 4,000 meters in the east in Kaçkar Mountains, form an almost unbroken wall separating the coast from the interior. The higher slopes facing northwest tend to be densely forested. Because of these natural conditions, the Black Sea coast historically has been isolated from Anatolia.

Running from Zonguldak in the west to Rize in the east, the narrow coastal strip widens at several places into fertile, intensely cultivated deltas. The Samsun area, close to the midpoint, is a major tobacco-growing region; east of it are numerous citrus groves. East of Samsun, the area around Trabzon is world-renowned for the production of hazelnuts, and farther east the Rize region has numerous tea plantations. All cultivable areas, including mountain slopes wherever they are not too steep, are sown or used as pasture. The mild, damp climate of the Black Sea coast makes commercial farming profitable. The western part of the Black Sea region, especially the Zonguldak area, is a center of coal mining and heavy industry.

The North Anatolian Mountains in the north are an interrupted chain of folded highlands that generally parallel the Black Sea coast. In the west, the mountains tend to be low, with elevations rarely exceeding 1,500 meters, but they rise in an easterly direction to heights greater than 3,000 meters south of Rize. Lengthy, trough-like valleys and basins characterize the mountains. Rivers flow from the mountains toward the Black Sea. The southern slopes—facing the Anatolian Plateau—are mostly unwooded, but the northern slopes contain dense growths of both deciduous and evergreen trees.

Tourism

Contary to the humid and hot weather in summer [ [http://www.karalahana.com/english/archive/land.html Land: Black Sea Region of Turkey] ] , the plateaux in the region are very attractive with rich flora and fauna, forests, crater lakes, rivers, streams, mountain and nature walk, rafting, canoe and winter sports, hunting and fishing, grass skiing, healing water and local dishes [ [http://www.karalahana.com/english.html Blacksea Region culture and travel] ] .

See also

* Provinces of Turkey

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Black Sea (disambiguation) — Black Sea may refer to:* The Black Sea, an inland sea between southeastern Europe and Asia Minor * Black Sea (region), a region in Turkey. * Black Sea (album), an album by XTC * a colloquial name for Ann Street, Boston * Black Sea Studios, a… …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea — The Black Sea is an inland sea bounded by southeastern Europe, the Caucasus and the Anatolian peninsula (Turkey) and is ultimately connected to the Atlantic Ocean via the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas and various straits. The Bosporus strait… …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea Forum for Partnership and Dialogue — legend|#00ff00|observersThe inaugural session of the Black Sea Forum for Partnership and Dialogue (BSF) was held on June 4 ndash;6, 2006 in Bucharest. The Forum is a Romanian initiative, initially meant to hold annual presidential level summits… …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea — a sea between Europe and Asia, bordered by Turkey, Rumania, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Georgia, and the Russian Federation. 164,000 sq. mi. (424,760 sq. km). Also called Euxine Sea. Ancient, Pontus Euxinus. * * * Sea between Europe and Asia. Bordered by… …   Universalium

  • Black Sea Fleet — sleeve ensign Navies of Russia Imperial Russia …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea Euroregion — is an Euroregion located in Romania and Bulgaria formed by Constanţa County and Tulcea County in Romania and Burgas Province, Dobrich Province, and Varna Province in Bulgaria. The administrative centre is Constanţa.This article needs updatingThe… …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea deluge theory — The Black Sea deluge is a hypothesized prehistoric flood that occurred when the Black Sea filled rapidly. The theory made headlines when The New York Times published it in December 1996. Flood hypothesis In 1998, William Ryan and Walter Pitman,… …   Wikipedia

  • Black Sea Cossack Host — Part of a series on Cossacks …   Wikipedia

  • Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation — BSEC redirects here. For other uses, see BSEC (disambiguation). Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Formation 4 June 1992 Type Economic cooperation organization …   Wikipedia

  • Operation Black Sea Harmony — Black Sea Harmony is a naval operation initiated by Turkey in March 2004 in accordance with UN Security Council Resolutions 1373, 1540 and 1566 aimed at deterring terrorism and asymmetric threats worldwide. It is similar to the NATO led Operation …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.