Fort Augustus Abbey


Fort Augustus Abbey

Fort Augustus Abbey, properly St. Benedict's Abbey, at Fort Augustus, Inverness-shire, Scotland, was a Benedictine monastery, from late in the nineteenth century to 1998.

History

It owed its inception to the desire of John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute, for the restoration of monasticism in Scotland. The marquess brought the matter before the superiors of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation in 1874, promising substantial pecuniary help in the establishment of a house in Scotland, with the understanding that when two other monasteries should have been founded they should all form a separate Scottish congregation. The suggestion was approved of, and the Anglo-Benedictine authorities resolved to incorporate with the Scottish monastery Lamspringe Abbey, in Hanover, which was peopled by English monks from 1645 to 1803.

Inadequacy of funds had prevented any lasting restoration of this house, but with the help promised by Lord Bute, it seemed possible to revive it in Scotland. Dom Jerome Vaughan, a brother of Cardinal Vaughan, was appointed to superintend the work, and succeeded in collecting from rich and poor in England, Scotland, and Ireland, sufficient means for the erection of a fine monastery a cost of some £70,000.

The site at Fort Augustus was given by Simon Fraser, 13th Lord Lovat. It comprised the buildings of a dismantled fort, built in 1729 and originally erected for the suppression of Highland Jacobites. It had been purchased from the Government by the Lovat family, in 1867.

The monastic buildings begun in 1876 were completed in 1880, occupying the four sides of a quadrangle about one hundred feet square. In one wing a school for boys of the upper classes was conducted by the monks, with lay masters, for about sixteen years.

Up to the year 1882 St. Benedict's monastery remained under the jurisdiction of the Anglo-Benedictine Congregation, but in response to the wishes of the Scottish hierarchy, and of the leading Scottish nobility -- notably Lords Lovat and Bute -- Pope Leo XIII, by his Brief "Summâ cum animi lætitiâ", dated 12 December, 1882, erected it into an independent abbey, immediately subject to the Holy See, thus separating it from English rule. When this step had been accomplished, Lord Lovat made over the property to the Scottish community, by signing the title deeds, which for a time had been held over.

In 1888 Dom Leo Linse of the Beuronese Benedictine Congregation, who had resided for more than ten years in England, part of that time as superior of Erdington Priory, near Birmingham, was nominated abbot by the Holy See and received the abbatial benediction at the hands of Archbishop Persico, who had been sent to the abbey as Apostolic Visitor. In 1889, special constitutions, based upon those of the Beuron Benedictine Congregation, were adopted, with the approval of the Holy See, for a term of ten years. These, after certain modifications suggested by experience, received definite approbation in 1901.

From 1893 the Solesmes version of the Gregorian melodies was used in all liturgical services. A church of large size, designed by Peter Paul Pugin, was commenced in 1890, replacing a temporary wooden one.

References

*Archives of Fort Augustus Abbey;
*"The Nineteenth Century" (October, 1884);
*"The Catholic World" (New York, September, 1895).


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fort Augustus Abbey — • A Benedictine monastery in Inverness shire, Scotland Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Fort Augustus — (Ordnance Survey gbmapping|NH379090) is a settlement in the Scottish Highlands, at the south west end of Loch Ness. The village has a population of around 646 (2001) [ [http://www.highland.gov.uk/plintra/iandr/cen/sz/fortaugustus.htm www.highland …   Wikipedia

  • Augustus Abbey, Fort — • A Benedictine monastery in Inverness shire, Scotland Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • FORT AUGUSTUS —    a small village on the Caledonian Canal, 33 m. SW. of Inverness; the fort, built in 1716 and enlarged in 1730, was utilised as a barrack during the disturbances in the Highlands, but after being dismantled and again garrisoned down to 1857, it …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • Abbey of Bec —     Abbey of Bec     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Abbey of Bec     The Benedictine Abbey of Bec, or Le Bec, in Normandy, was founded in the earlier part of the eleventh century by Herluin, a Norman knight who about 1031 left the court of Count… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Downside Abbey — The Basilica of St Gregory the Great at Downside, commonly known as Downside Abbey, is a Roman Catholic Benedictine monastery and the Senior House of the English Benedictine Congregation. One of its main apostolates is a school for children aged… …   Wikipedia

  • Curzon Park Abbey — is one of three monasteries of nuns in the English Benedictine Congregation. Contents 1 History 2 Services 3 References 4 External links …   Wikipedia

  • Douai Abbey — Douai Abbey …   Wikipedia

  • Colwich Abbey — is a community of Roman Catholic nuns of the English Benedictine Congregation founded in 1623 at Cambrai, Flanders, in the Spanish Netherlands. During the French Revolution, the community was expelled from France, and settled at The Mount,… …   Wikipedia

  • Saint Anselm's Abbey — St. Anselm s Abbey is a Benedictine Abbey located at 4501 South Dakota Avenue NE, Washington, DC, 20017. It operates the prestigious boys middle and high school St. Anselm s Abbey School. History In the early 1920s, a group of Americans under the …   Wikipedia


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.