List of Neopagan movements


List of Neopagan movements
Symbols of several neopagan faiths:
SlavicCelticGermanic
Greekneopagan pentagramRoman
WiccaEgyptian • Semitic

Neopaganism, or contemporary paganism, encompasses a wide range of religious groups and individuals. These may include old occult groups, those that follow a New Age approach, those that try to reconstruct old ethnic faiths, and followers of the religion of Wicca. For organizations, the founding year is given in brackets.

Contents

Early movements

Druids celebrating at Stonehenge.

Pre-World War II Neopagan or proto-Neopagan groups, growing out of occultism and/or Romanticism (Viking revival, Celtic revival).

Witchcraft

Wicca originated in 1940s Britain and became the mainstream of Neopaganism in the United States in the 1970s. There are two core traditions of Wicca which originated in Britain, Gardnerian and Alexandrian, which are sometimes referred to as British Traditional Wicca. From these two arose several other variant traditions. Wicca has also inspired a great number of other witchcraft traditions in Britain, Europe and the United States, most of which base their beliefs and practices on Wicca. Many movements are influenced by the Movement of the Goddess, and New Age and feminist worldviews.

Wicca

A Wiccan ritual altar.

Other

New Age, Eclectic or Syncretic

Ethnic

Heathenism (Germanic)

Winternights sacrifice at Öskjuhlíð, in Reykjavík.

Heathenism (also Heathenry), or Greater Heathenry, is a blanket term for the whole Germanic Neopagan movement. Various currents and denominations have arisen over the years within it, including recently a grassroots movement of local independent Kindreds.

Celtism (Celtic)

Other European

Ritual at the Temple of Garni, in Armenia.

Ancient Near East

  • Semitic Neopaganism
  • Kemetism (Egyptian Neopaganism)
    • Ausar Auset, "Black" Kemetism or Neterianism (1973)
    • Kemetic Orthodoxy, "White" Kemetism (1988)
    • Church of the Eternal Source (1970)
    • Ta Noutri (2002)

Similar non-Pagan (non-European or Near Eastern) movements

See also

External links


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