Cisgender


Cisgender

Cisgender (play /ˈsɪsɛndər/) (or cisgendered) is an adjective used in the context of gender issues and counselling to refer to a class of gender identities formed by a match between an individual's gender identity and the behavior or role considered appropriate for one's sex.[1]

Kristen Schilt and Laurel Westbrook defined "cisgender" as a label for "individuals who have a match between the gender they were assigned at birth, their bodies, and their personal identity", complementing "transgender".[2] A similar adjective is "gender-normative"; Eli R. Green wrote, "The term 'cisgendered' is used [instead of the more popular 'gender normative'] to refer to people who do not identify with a gender diverse experience, without enforcing existence of a 'normative' gender expression."[3] There are many derivatives of the term in use including cis male, cis female, and cissexual.

Contents

Language

The word has its origin in the Latin-derived prefix cis, meaning "to/this the near side" as in the cis-trans distinction in chemistry, or in the ancient Roman term "Cisalpine Gaul", i.e., "Gaul on this side of the Alps". In the case of gender, however, "cis" refers to the alignment of gender identity with assigned gender.

Internet use

The word cisgender has been used on the internet since at least 1994, when it appeared in the alt.transgendered Usenet group in a post by Dana Leland Defosse.[4] Defosse does not define the term and seems to assume that readers are already familiar with it. It may also have been independently coined a year later: Donna Lynn Matthews, the charter maintainer of the alt.support.crossdressing usenet group, attributed the word to Carl Buijs, a transsexual man from the Netherlands, claiming that Buijs coined the word in 1995.[5] In April 1996, Buijs said in a Usenet posting, "As for the origin, I just made it up. I just kept running into the problem of what to call non-trans people in various discussions, and one day it just hit me: non-trans equals cis. Therefore, cisgendered."[6]

While sexologist Volkmar Sigusch used the term "cissexual" (or "zissexuelle" in German) in a 1991 article,[7] "cisgender" may have been coined independently.

Academic use

The term has more recently been used in publications, such as a 2006 article in the Journal of Lesbian Studies[8] and Julia Serano's 2007 book Whipping Girl.[9] Serano also uses the related terms cissexual, which she defines as "people who are not transsexual and who have only ever experienced their subconscious and physical sexes as being aligned" (p. 12), and cissexism, "which is the belief that transsexuals' identified genders are inferior to, or less authentic than, those of cissexuals."[10] While having been used by trans activists for some time,[11][12] the term cisgender privilege has recently appeared in the academic literature and is defined there as the "set of unearned advantages that individuals who identify as the gender they were assigned at birth accrue solely due to having a cisgender identity" (p. 83).[13]

References

  1. ^ Crethar, H. C. & Vargas, L. A. (2007). Multicultural intricacies in professional counseling. In J. Gregoire & C. Jungers (Eds.), The counselor’s companion: What every beginning counselor needs to know. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. ISBN 0805856846. p.61.
  2. ^ Schilt, Kristen; Westbrook, Laurel (August 2009). "Doing Gender, Doing Heteronormativity: 'Gender Normals,' Transgender People, and the Social Maintenance of Heterosexuality". Gender & Society 23 (4): 440–464. 
  3. ^ Green, Eli R. (2006). "Debating Trans Inclusion in the Feminist Movement: A Trans-Positive Analysis". Journal of Lesbian Studies 10 (1/2): 231–248. 
  4. ^ Dana Leland Defosse (1994-05-26). "Transgender Research". Posted on alt.transgendered newsgroup. http://groups.google.com/group/alt.transgendered/browse_thread/thread/69c04e35666a9a1b/69ebde0bf2af8dc6?lnk=st&q=cisgendered+dana+defosse&rnum=1&hl=en#69ebde0bf2af8dc6. Retrieved 2007-12-22. 
  5. ^ Donna Lynn Matthews (May 1999). "Definitions". Donna's Hideout. http://cydathria.com/ms_donna/tg_def.html. Retrieved 2007-12-22. 
  6. ^ Carl Buijs (1996-04-16). "A new perspective on an old topic". Posted on soc.support.transgendered newsgroup. http://groups.google.com/group/soc.support.transgendered/msg/184850df15e48963?hl=en. Retrieved 2007-12-22. 
  7. ^ Sigusch, Volkmar (February 1998). "The Neosexual Revolution". Archives of Sexual Behavior 27 (4): 331–359. doi:10.1023/A:1018715525493. PMID 9681118. 
  8. ^ Green, Eli R. (2006). "Debating Trans Inclusion in the Feminist Movement: A Trans-Positive Analysis", Journal of Lesbian Studies. Volume: 10 Issue: 1/2. pp. 231 - 248. ISSN 1089-4160
  9. ^ Serano, Julia (2007), Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, Seal Press, 2007. ISBN 978-1-58005-154-5, ISBN 1-58005-154-5
  10. ^ Serano (2007) also defines cisgender as synonymous with "non-transgender" and cissexual with "non-transsexual". (p. 33)
  11. ^ Koyama, E. (2002). Cisexual! cisgender: Decentralizing the dominant group. Retrieved June 10, 2009 from http://eminism.org/interchange!2002!20020607-wmstl.html
  12. ^ T -Vox. (2009). Cis gender privilege. Retrieved June 5, 2009 from http://t-vox.org/index.php?Title=CisgendecPrivilege
  13. ^ Walls, N. E., & Costello, K. (2010). "Head ladies center for teacup chain": Exploring cisgender privilege in a (predominantly) gay male context. In S. Anderson and V. Middleton Explorations in diversity: Examining privilege and oppression in a multicultural society, 2nd ed. (pp. 81-93). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Further Reading

See also


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cisgender — (lat. cis „diesseits“ und engl. gender „Geschlecht“) ist das Gegenteil von Transgender (lat. trans „jenseitig“, „darüber hinaus“), bezeichnet also Menschen, deren Geschlechtsidentität mit ihrem körperlichen Geschlecht übereinstimmt. Dies trifft… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • cisgender — adj. Identifying with one s physical gender. Also: cis gender, cisgendered. Example Citations: We don t call being cisgender which is when our bodies match up with our internal sense of gender a personal choice. Both are about being who you are,… …   New words

  • cisgender — adjective Identifying with or experiencing a gender the same as ones biological sex or that is affirmed by society, e.g. being both male gendered male sexed. Syn: cisgendered Ant: transgender See Also: cis, cissexual …   Wiktionary

  • cisgender — /ˈsɪsdʒɛndə/ (say sisjenduh) adjective 1. of or relating to, or designating a person whose gender identity matches their physical sex, that is, women with female bodies and men with male bodies, this being regarded as normal. –noun 2. such a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Biofrau — Cisgender (lat. cis „diesseits“ und engl. gender „Geschlecht“) ist das Gegenteil von Transgender (lat. trans „jenseitig“, „darüber hinaus“), bezeichnet also Menschen, deren Geschlechtsidentität mit ihrem körperlichen Geschlecht übereinstimmt.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Biomann — Cisgender (lat. cis „diesseits“ und engl. gender „Geschlecht“) ist das Gegenteil von Transgender (lat. trans „jenseitig“, „darüber hinaus“), bezeichnet also Menschen, deren Geschlechtsidentität mit ihrem körperlichen Geschlecht übereinstimmt.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Zissexualität — Cisgender (lat. cis „diesseits“ und engl. gender „Geschlecht“) ist das Gegenteil von Transgender (lat. trans „jenseitig“, „darüber hinaus“), bezeichnet also Menschen, deren Geschlechtsidentität mit ihrem körperlichen Geschlecht übereinstimmt.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Zissexuell — Cisgender (lat. cis „diesseits“ und engl. gender „Geschlecht“) ist das Gegenteil von Transgender (lat. trans „jenseitig“, „darüber hinaus“), bezeichnet also Menschen, deren Geschlechtsidentität mit ihrem körperlichen Geschlecht übereinstimmt.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Transgender — (IPAEng|trænzˈdʒɛndɚ, from (Latin) derivatives [ trans …   Wikipedia

  • Coming out — For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). Part of a series on Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) people Sexual orientation …   Wikipedia


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