Secrecy


Secrecy

Secrecy (also called clandestinity or furtiveness) is the practice of hiding information from certain individuals or groups, perhaps while sharing it with other individuals. That which is kept hidden is known as the secret.

Secrecy is often controversial, depending on the content of the secret, the group or people keeping the secret, and the motivation for secrecy. Secrecy by government entities is often decried as excessive or in promotion of poor operation; excessive revelation of information on individuals can conflict with virtues of privacy and confidentiality.

Secrecy is sometimes considered of life or death importance. U.S. soldier at camp during World War II.

Contents

Secrecy in sociology and zoology

Animals conceal the location of their den or nest from predators. Squirrels bury nuts, hiding them, and they try to remember their locations later.

Humans attempt to consciously conceal aspects of themselves from others due to shame, or from fear of violence, rejection, harassment, loss of acceptance, or loss of employment. Humans may also attempt to conceal aspects of their own self which they are not capable of incorporating psychologically into their conscious being. Families sometimes maintain "family secrets", obliging family members never to discuss disagreeable issues concerning the family with outsiders or sometimes even within the family. Many "family secrets" are maintained by using a mutually agreed-upon construct (an official family story) when speaking with outside members. Agreement to maintain the secret is often coerced through "shaming" and reference to family honor. The information may even be something as trivial as a recipe.

Keeping one's strategy secret is important in many aspects of game theory.

Secret sharing (anthropology)

In anthropology secret sharing is one way for men and women to establish traditional relations with other men and women.[citation needed] A commonly used[citation needed] narrative that describes this kind of behavior is Joseph Conrad's short story "The Secret Sharer".

Government secrecy

Governments often attempt to conceal information from other governments and the public. These state secrets can include weapon designs, military plans, diplomatic negotiation tactics, and secrets obtained illicitly from others ("intelligence"). Most nations have some form of Official Secrets Act (the Espionage Act in the U.S.) and classify material according to the level of protection needed (hence the term "classified information"). An individual needs a security clearance for access and other protection methods, such as keeping documents in a safe, are stipulated.

Few people dispute the desirability of keeping Critical Nuclear Weapon Design Information secret, but many believe government secrecy to be excessive and too often employed for political purposes. Many countries have laws that attempt to limit government secrecy, such as the U.S. Freedom of Information Act and sunshine laws. Government officials sometimes leak information they are supposed to keep secret. (For a recent (2005) example, see Plame affair.)

Secrecy in elections is a growing issue, particularly secrecy of vote counts on computerized vote counting machines. While voting, citizens are acting in a unique sovereign or "owner" capacity (instead of being a subject of the laws, as is true outside of elections) in selecting their government servants. It is argued that secrecy is impermissible as against the public in the area of elections where the government gets all of its power and taxing authority. In any event, permissible secrecy varies significantly with the context involved.

Corporate security

Organizations, ranging from multi-national for profit corporations to nonprofit charities, keep secrets for competitive advantage, to meet legal requirements, or, in some cases, to conceal nefarious behavior. New products under development, unique manufacturing techniques, or simply lists of customers are types of information protected by trade secret laws. The patent system encourages inventors to publish information in exchange for a limited time monopoly on its use, though patent applications are initially secret. Secret societies use secrecy as a way to attract members by creating a sense of importance.

Other laws require organizations to keep certain information secret, such as medical records (HIPAA in the U.S.), or financial reports that are under preparation (to limit insider trading). Europe has particularly strict laws about database privacy.

In many countries, neoliberal reforms of government have included expanding the outsourcing of government tasks and functions to private businesses with the aim of improving efficiency and effectiveness in government administration. However, among the criticisms of these reforms is the claim that the pervasive use of "Commercial-in-confidence" (or secrecy) clauses in contracts between government and private providers further limits public accountability of governments and prevents proper public scrutiny of the performance and probity of the private companies. Concerns have been raised that 'commercial-in-confidence' is open to abuse because it can be deliberately used to hide corporate or government maladministration and even corruption. A string of publicly scandalous revelations about poor, wasteful or corrupt management of government-funded private contracts left unchecked for lengthy periods, often in prison management,[citation needed] has added credence to the views of skeptics about the prudency of the neoliberal reforms themselves.

Technology secrecy

Preservation of secrets is one of the goals of information security. Techniques used include physical security and cryptography. The latter depends on the secrecy of cryptographic keys. Secrecy is central to organized crime. Many believe that security technology can be more effective if it itself is not kept secret.

Information hiding is a design principle in much software engineering. It is considered easier to verify software reliability if one can be sure that different parts of the program can only access (and therefore depend on) a known limited amount of information.

Military secrecy

A military secret is secret information that is purposely not made available to the general public and hence to any enemy, by the military in order to gain an advantage or to not reveal a weakness, avoid embarrassment or to help in propaganda efforts.

Most military secrets are military in nature, such as the strengths and weaknesses of weapons systems, tactics, training methods, number and location of specific weapons and plans.

Some involve information in broader areas, such as secure communications, cryptography, intelligence operations and cooperation with third-parties.

Views on secrecy

Excessive secrecy is often cited[citation needed] as a source of much human conflict. One may have to lie in order to hold a secret, which might lead to psychological repercussions.[original research?] The alternative, declining to answer when asked something, may suggest the answer and may therefore not always be suitable for keeping a secret. Also, the other may insist that one answer the question.[improper synthesis?] Nearly 2500 years ago, Sophocles wrote, "Do nothing secretly; for Time sees and hears all things, and discloses all." And Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, once said "Three things cannot long stay hidden: the sun, the moon and the truth".

See also

References

The Federal Information Manual. P. Stephen Gidiere III. American Bar Association (2006)Google Books

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Secrecy — Se cre*cy, n.; pl. {Secrecies}. [From {Secret}.] 1. The state or quality of being hidden; as, his movements were detected in spite of their secrecy. [1913 Webster] The Lady Anne, Whom the king hath in secrecy long married. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • secrecy — index concealment, confidence (relation of trust), evasion, mystery, obscuration, privacy Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • secrecy — (n.) early 15c., secretee, quality of being secret, from O.Fr. secré, variant of secret (see SECRET (Cf. secret)). Form altered late 16c. on model of primacy, etc …   Etymology dictionary

  • secrecy — [n] concealment clandestineness, confidence, confidentiality, covertness, dark, darkness, furtiveness, hiding, hush, isolation, mystery, privacy, reticence, retirement, seclusion, secretiveness, secretness, silence, solitude, stealth, suppression …   New thesaurus

  • secrecy — [sē′krə sē] n. pl. secrecies [altered < ME secretee < secre, secret < OFr secré < L secretus: see SECRET] 1. the condition of being secret or concealed 2. a tendency to keep things secret; practice or habit of being secretive …   English World dictionary

  • secrecy — n. 1) to ensure secrecy 2) strict secrecy 3) secrecy in (secrecy in conducting negotiations) 4) in secrecy (to meet in secrecy) (the meetings were held in the strictest secrecy) 5) (misc.) to swear smb. to secrecy * * * [ siːkrɪsɪ] (misc.) to… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • secrecy — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ absolute, complete, total ▪ great, strict, utmost ▪ excessive ▪ government …   Collocations dictionary

  • secrecy — se|cre|cy [ˈsi:krəsi] n [U] [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: secretie secrecy (15 16 centuries), from secre secret (14 16 centuries), from Old French secré, from Latin secretus; SECRET1] 1.) the process of keeping something secret, or when something is… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • secrecy — se|cre|cy [ sikrəsi ] noun uncount a situation in which you keep something secret, or the process of keeping something secret: Discussions were to take place in total secrecy. shrouded/cloaked/veiled in secrecy: The Iraqi contract was shrouded in …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • secrecy — noun (U) 1 the process of keeping something secret, or the state of being kept a secret: I must stress the need for absolute secrecy about the project. 2 be sworn to secrecy if you have been sworn to secrecy by someone, you have promised them… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English