Jess Neely


Jess Neely
Jess Neely
Sport(s) Football, baseball
Biographical details
Born January 4, 1898(1898-01-04)
Place of birth Smyrna, Tennessee
Died April 9, 1983(1983-04-09) (aged 85)
Place of death Weslaco, Texas
Playing career
1920–1922 Vanderbilt
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1924–1927
1928–1930
1931–1939
1940–1966

Baseball
1929–1930
1932–1938
1945, 1948

Southwestern (TN)
Alabama (assistant)
Clemson
Rice


Alabama
Clemson
Rice
Head coaching record
Overall 207–176–19 (football)
109–108–5 (baseball)
Bowls 4–3
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 SWC (1946, 1949, 1953, 1957)
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1967)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1971 (profile)

Jess C. Neely (January 4, 1898 – April 9, 1983) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Southwestern University, now Rhodes College (1924–1927), Clemson University (1931–1939), and Rice University (1940–1966), compiling a career college football record of 207–176–19. Neely was also the head baseball coach at the University of Alabama (1929–1930), Clemson (1932–1938), and Rice (1945, 1948), tallying a career college baseball mark of 109–108–5. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1971.

Contents

Playing career

Neely played college football at Vanderbilt University from 1920 to 1922 under head coach Dan McGugin.

Coaching career

Neely began his football coaching career at Rhodes College, then Southwestern University, where he complied an 18–15–2 record from 1924–1927. He was an assistant at Alabama from 1928–1930 and was also head baseball coach there from 1929–1930, totally a 28–15–2 record.

From 1931 to 1939, he coached at Clemson, and compiled a 43–35–7 record. From 1940 to 1966, he coached at Rice, and compiled a 144–124–10 record. This makes him by far the winningest coach in Rice history.

Neely won the first four bowl games he coached: 1940 Cotton Bowl (with Clemson), 1946 Orange Bowl, 1949 and 1953 Cotton Bowls (with Rice). With Rice he lost the last three bowl games he coached: 1957 Cotton Bowl, 1960 Sugar Bowl, and 1961 Bluebonnet Bowl.

After the 1966 season, he returned to Vanderbilt as athletic director. In 1967, he received the Amos Alonzo Stagg Award. In 1999, he was ranked number 39 in Sports Illustrated's list of the "50 Greatest Tennessee Sports Figures of the 20th Century".[1]

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Southwestern Lynx () (1924–1927)
1924 Southwestern 3–6
1925 Southwestern 7–2
1926 Southwestern 5–4–1
1927 Southwestern 5–5–1
Southwestern: 20–17–2
Clemson Tigers (Southern Conference) (1931–1939)
1931 Clemson 1–6–2 1–4 20th
1932 Clemson 3–5–1 0–4 T–21st
1933 Clemson 3–6–2 1–1 T–5th
1934 Clemson 5–4 2–1 5th
1935 Clemson 6–3 2–1 4th
1936 Clemson 5–5 3–3 8th
1937 Clemson 4–4–1 2–0–1 T–3rd
1938 Clemson 7–1–1 3–0–1 2nd
1939 Clemson 9–1 4–0 2nd W Cotton 12
Clemson: 43–35–7 18–14–2
Rice Owls (Southwest Conference) (1940–1966)
1940 Rice 7–3 4–2 T–3rd
1941 Rice 6–3–1 3–2–1 4th
1942 Rice 7–2–1 4–1–1 2nd
1943 Rice 3–7 2–3 T–3rd
1944 Rice 5–6 2–3 T–4th
1945 Rice 5–6 3–3 T–3rd
1946 Rice 9–2 5–1 T–1st W Orange 10
1947 Rice 6–3–1 4–2 3rd 18
1948 Rice 5–4–1 3–2–1 T–3rd
1949 Rice 10–1 6–0 1st W Cotton 5
1950 Rice 6–4 2–4 T–5th
1951 Rice 5–5 3–3 T–3rd
1952 Rice 5–5 4–2 2nd
1953 Rice 9–2 5–1 T–1st W Cotton 6 6
1954 Rice 7–3 4–2 T–3rd 19 19
1955 Rice 2–7–1 0–6 7th
1956 Rice 4–6 1–5 5th
1957 Rice 7–4 5–1 1st L Cotton 7 8
1958 Rice 5–5 4–2 T–2nd
1959 Rice 1–7–2 1–4–1 6th
1960 Rice 7–4 5–2 T–2nd L Sugar
1961 Rice 7–4 5–2 3rd L Bluebonnet 17
1962 Rice 2–6–2 2–4–1 6th
1963 Rice 6–4 4–3 3rd
1964 Rice 4–5–1 3–3–1 T–4th
1965 Rice 2–8 1–6 T–7th
1966 Rice 2–8 1–6 8th
Rice: 144–124–10 86–75–6
Total: 207–176–19
      National Championship         Conference Title         Conference Division Title
#Rankings from final Coaches' Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

See also

  • List of college football coaches with 200 wins

References

External links


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