Hawker Hunter variants

Hawker Hunter variants

Contents

The following is a list of Variants of the Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft:

Prototypes

Hawker P.1067
Prototype, first flight 20 July 1951, three built with the first later modified as a Hunter Mk 3 for the successful World Speed Record attempts.
Hawker P.1083
Supersonic design based on the P.1067 with 50 degree wing sweep and afterburning Avon engine. Construction abandoned and the fuselage and tail were used as basis for the P.1099.
Hawker P.1101
Two-seat trainer prototype, first flight 8 July 1955, two built.

Production versions

Hunter F.1
First production version, Avon 113 engine, first flight 16 March 1953, 139 built.
Hunter F.2
Sapphire 101 engine, first flight 14 October 1953, 45 built by Armstrong Whitworth at Coventry.
Hunter Mk 3
Sometimes mistakenly called F.3, but it carried no weapons.
The first prototype fitted with afterburning Avon RA.7R with 9,600 lbf (42.70 kN) engine, pointed nose, airbrakes on the sides of the fuselage, and a revised windscreen. Used to set raise the world's absolute air speed record to 727.6 mph (1,171 km/h) off the English south coast on 7 September 1953, and days later to set a new 62 mi (100 km) circuit record. It was sold in 1955 and retired as an RAF ground instructional airframe. Now in the Museum at Tangmere, Sussex.
Hunter F.4
Additional bag-type fuel tanks in the wings, provision for underwing fuel tanks, Avon 115 (later Avon 121) engine, blisters under the nose for ammunition links, first flight 20 October 1954, 349 built.
Hunter F.5
F.4 with Sapphire 101 engine, 105 built by Armstrong Whitworth at Coventry
Hunter F.6
Single-seat clear-weather interceptor fighter. Powered by one 10,150 lbf (45.17 kN) Rolls-Royce Avon 203 turbojet engine, revised wing with a leading edge "dogtooth" and four hardpoints, and a follow-up tailplane on later aircraft (also rerofitted to the early production examples) to improve pitch response at high Mach number, first flight 22 January 1954, 384 built.
Hunter F.6A
Modified F.6 with brake parachute and 230 gallon inboard drop tanks, for use at RAF Brawdy, where diversion airfields were distant.
Hunter T.7
Two-seat trainer built for the RAF. A side by side seating nose section replaced the single seat nose. Engine and systems as for the F.4; some were rebuilt F.4s, others were new build. The dog-tooth leading edge and follow-up tailpane mods, as on the F.6, were fitted to the T.7.
Hunter T.7A
T.7 modified with the Integrated Flight Instrumentation System (IFIS). Used by the RAF as a Blackburn Buccaneer conversion training aircraft.
Hunter T.8
Two-seat trainer for the Royal Navy. Fitted with an arrestor hook for use on RN airfields but otherwise similar to the T.7
Hunter T.8B
T.8 with TACAN radio-navigation system and IFIS fitted, cannon and ranging radar removed. Used by the Royal Navy as a Blackburn Buccaneer conversion training aircraft.
Hunter T.8C
T.8 with TACAN fitted.
Hunter T.8M
T.8 fitted with the Sea Harrier's Blue Fox radar, used by the Royal Navy to train Sea Harrier pilots.
Hunter FGA.9
Single-seat ground-attack fighter version for the RAF; all were modified from F.6 airframes. Strengthened wing, 230 gallon inboard drop tanks, tail chute, increased oxygen capacity, and bobweight in pitch control circuit to increase stick force in ground attack manoeuvres.
Hunter FR.10
Single-seat reconnaissance version; all 33 were rebuilt F.6 airframes, with 3 x F95 cameras, revised instrument panel layout, brake parachute and 230 gallon inboard drop tanks. Increased oxygen as for the FGA.9, but no pitch bobweight.
Hunter GA.11
Single-seat weapons training version for the Royal Navy. Forty ex-RAF Hunter F.4s were converted into the Hunter GA.11. The GA.11 was fitted with an arrester hook and some later had a Harley light. The guns were removed.
Hunter PR.11
Single-seat reconnaissance version for the Royal Navy. The nose was as on the FR.10.
Hunter Mk 12
Two-seat test aircraft for the Royal Aircraft Establishment. One built, converted from an F.6 airframe..

Export versions

Hunter Mk 50
Export version of the Hunter F.4 fighter for Sweden. Swedish designation J 34, 120 built.
Hunter Mk 51
Export version of the Hunter F.4 fighter for Denmark, 30 built.
Hunter Mk 52
Export version of the Hunter F.4 fighter for Peru, 16 built.
Hunter T.53
Export version of the Hunter T.7 trainer for Denmark, two built.
Hunter Mk 56
Export version of the Hunter F.6 fighter for India, 160 built. Brake parachute added and the provision to carry 500 lb (227 kg) bombs, minor changes to the avionic systems including the removal of the UHF radio facility.
Hunter FGA.56A
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for India.
Hunter FGA.57
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Kuwait.
Hunter Mk 58
Export version of the Hunter F.6 fighter for Switzerland.
Hunter Mk 58A
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Switzerland
Hunter FGA.59
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Iraq.
Hunter FGA.59A
18 aircraft were sold to Iraq as part of a follow-on order.
Hunter FGA.59B
Four aircraft were sold to Iraq as part of a follow-on order.
Hunter Mk 60
Export version of the Hunter F.6 fighter for Saudi Arabia.
Hunter T.62
Export version of the Hunter T.7 trainer for Peru.
Hunter T.66
Two-seat training version for the Indian Air Force, powered by a Rolls-Royce Avon 200-series turbojet engine.
Hunter T.66A
A composite Hunter, built from a damaged Belgian F.6 bought back by the company, and a 2-seat nose originally built for display at the Paris Salon. Used as a demonstration aircraft, registered G-APUX. Finished in red and white, and used for promotional displays and in evaluations. Later sold to Chile as a T.72.
Hunter T.66B
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Jordan.
Hunter T.66C
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Lebanon.
Hunter T.66D
12 aircraft sold to India as part of a follow-on order.
Hunter T.66E
Five aircraft sold to India as part of a follow-on order.
Hunter T.67
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Kuwait.
Hunter T.68
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Switzerland.
Hunter T.69
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Iraq.
Hunter FGA.70
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Lebanon.
Hunter FGA.70A
Lebanon.
Hunter T.70
This was the unofficial designation given to two ex-RAF Hunter T.7s sold to Saudi Arabia.
Hunter FGA.71
export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Chile.
Hunter FR.71A
Export version of the Hunter FR.10 reconnaissance aircraft for Chile.
Hunter T.72
Export version of the T.66 trainer for Chile.
Hunter FGA.73
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Jordan.
Hunter FGA.73A
Four aircraft sold to Jordan as part of a follow-on order.
Hunter FGA.73B
Three aircraft sold to Jordan as part of a follow-on order.
A retired 140 Squadron, Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) Hawker Hunter F.74 - serial number 527 (ex-RAF XF458), parked outside the RSAF Museum. Also, note the number of hardpoints and the ADEN gun ports which had been faired over to protect this museum piece against the weather.
Hunter FGA.74
12× Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Singapore, upgraded in late 1970s and re-designated as Hunter F.74S.[1][2][3]
Hunter FR.74A
4× Export version of the Hunter FR.10 reconnaissance aircraft for Singapore, upgraded in late 1970s and re-designated as Hunter FR.74S.[1][2][3]
Hunter FR.74B
22× aircraft delivered to Singapore as part of a follow order, upgraded in late 1970s and re-designated as Hunter FR.74S.[1][2][3]
Hunter T.75
4× Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Singapore, upgraded in late 1970s and re-designated as Hunter T.75S.[1][2][3]
Hunter T.75A
4× aircraft delivered to Singapore as part of a follow-on order (A fifth aircraft was lost in an accident before delivery), upgraded in late 1970s and re-designated as Hunter T.75S.[1][2][3]
Hunter FGA.76
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Abu Dhabi.
Hunter FR.76A
Export version of the Hunter FR.10 reconnaissance aircraft for Abu Dhabi.
Hunter T.77
Export version of the Hunter T.7 trainer for Abu Dhabi.
Hunter FGA.78
Export version of the Hunter FGA.9 ground-attack fighter for Qatar.
Hunter T.79
Export version of the Hunter T.7 trainer for Qatar.
Hunter FGA.80
Ex-RAF FGA.9 ground-attack fighter sold to Kenya.
Hunter T.81
Export version of the Hunter T.66 trainer for Kenya.

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e "Hawker Hunter Survivor 527". www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk. http://www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk/hunter/survivor.php?id=778. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Greg, Goebel. "Hawker Hunter In British & Foreign Service". www.wingweb.co.uk. http://www.wingweb.co.uk/aircraft/Hawker_Hunter_in_service.html. Retrieved 15 April 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Peter, Atkins (November 1994). "Singapore or Bust". Air Forces Monthly (Key Publishing Ltd) (67). ISSN 09557091. 
Bibliography
  • Deacon, Ray. Hawker Hunter - 50 Golden Years. Feltham,, UK: Vogelsang Publications, 2001. ISBN 0-9540666-0-X.
  • Griffin, David. Hawker Hunter 1951 to 2007. Tacoma, WA, USA: Lulu Enterpises. www.Lulu.com, 2007. ISBN 1-4303-0593-4.
  • Hannah, Donald. Hawker FlyPast Reference Library. Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK: Key Publishing Ltd., 1982. ISBN 0-946219-01-X.
  • Jackson, Robert. Modern Combat Aircraft 15, Hawker Hunter. Shepperton, Surrey, UK: Cromwell Books, 1982, ISBN 0-7110-1216-4.
  • James, Derek N. Hawker, an Aircraft Album No. 5. New York: Arco Publishing Company, 1973. ISBN 0-668-02699-5. (First published in the UK by Ian Allan in 1972.)
  • Mason, Francis K. Hawker Aircraft since 1920. London: Putnam, 1991. ISBN 0-85177-839-9
  • Winchester, Jim, ed. "Hawker Hunter." Military Aircraft of the Cold War (The Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2006. ISBN 1-84013-929-3.

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