Cystic duct


Cystic duct
Cystic duct
Illu liver gallbladder.jpg
1: Right lobe of liver
2: Left lobe of liver
3: Quadrate lobe of liver
4: Round ligament of liver
5: Falciform ligament
6: Caudate lobe of liver
7: Inferior vena cava
8: Common bile duct
9: Hepatic artery
10: Portal vein
11: Cystic duct
12: Hepatic duct
13: Gallbladder
Latin ductus cysticus
Gray's subject #250 1198
Artery cystic artery
1. Bile ducts: 2. Intrahepatic bile ducts, 3. Left and right hepatic ducts, 4. Common hepatic duct, 5. Cystic duct, 6. Common bile duct, 7. Ampulla of Vater, 8. Major duodenal papilla
9. Gallbladder, 10-11. Right and left lobes of liver. 12. Spleen.
13. Esophagus. 14. Stomach. Small intestine: 15. Duodenum, 16. Jejunum
17. Pancreas: 18: Accessory pancreatic duct, 19: Pancreatic duct.
20-21: Right and left kidneys (silhouette).
The anterior border of the liver is lifted upwards (brown arrow). Gallbladder with Longitudinal section, pancreas and duodenum with frontal one. Intrahepatic ducts and stomach in transparency.

The cystic duct is the short duct that joins the gall bladder to the common bile duct. It usually lies next to the cystic artery. It is of variable length. It contains a 'spiral valve', which does not provide much resistance to the flow of bile.

Contents

Function

Bile can flow in both directions between the gallbladder and the common hepatic duct and the (common) bile duct.

In this way, bile is stored in the gallbladder in between meal times. The hormone cholecystokinin, when stimulated by a fatty meal, promotes bile secretion by increased production of hepatic bile, contraction of the gall bladder, and relaxation of the Sphincter of Oddi.

Clinical significance

Gallstones can enter and obstruct the cystic duct, preventing the flow of bile. The increased pressure in the gallbladder leads to swelling and pain. This pain is sometimes referred to as a gallbladder "attack" because of its sudden onset.

During a cholecystectomy, the cystic duct is clipped two or three times and a cut is made between the clips, freeing the gallbladder to be taken out.

See also

Additional images

External links



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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cystic duct — Cystic Cyst ic (s?s t?k), a. [Cf. F. cystique.] 1. Having the form of, or living in, a cyst; as, the cystic entozoa. [1913 Webster] 2. Containing cysts; cystose; as, cystic sarcoma. [1913 Webster] 3. (Anat.) Pertaining to, or contained in, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cystic duct — n the duct from the gallbladder that unites with the hepatic duct to form the common bile duct * * * see bile duct * * * ductus cysticus …   Medical dictionary

  • cystic duct — noun also cystic canal : the duct from the gallbladder that unites with the hepatic to form the common bile duct see digestion illustration …   Useful english dictionary

  • cystic duct — see bile duct …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • Проток Пузырный (Cystic Duct) — см. Проток желчный. Источник: Медицинский словарь …   Медицинские термины

  • spiral valve of cystic duct — spiral valve of Heister plica spiralis …   Medical dictionary

  • Cystic — Cyst ic (s?s t?k), a. [Cf. F. cystique.] 1. Having the form of, or living in, a cyst; as, the cystic entozoa. [1913 Webster] 2. Containing cysts; cystose; as, cystic sarcoma. [1913 Webster] 3. (Anat.) Pertaining to, or contained in, a cyst; esp …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cystic worm — Cystic Cyst ic (s?s t?k), a. [Cf. F. cystique.] 1. Having the form of, or living in, a cyst; as, the cystic entozoa. [1913 Webster] 2. Containing cysts; cystose; as, cystic sarcoma. [1913 Webster] 3. (Anat.) Pertaining to, or contained in, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cystic artery — Artery: Cystic artery The cystic artery branches from the hepatic artery proper …   Wikipedia

  • Duct (anatomy) — For qualities of writing or speech, see Ductus (linguistics). Duct Dissection of a lactating breast. 1 Fat 2 Lactiferous duct/lobule 3 Lobule 4 Con …   Wikipedia


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