Out of the frying pan into the fire


Out of the frying pan into the fire

Out of the frying pan into the fire is a phrase which can be used in one of two ways. It can be used in the same way as "from bad to worse," which as the wording suggests means going from an unpleasant situation to one even more so - or it can describe the belief that one has escaped a dangerous or troublesome situation, when actually they have entered an even worse one.

In popular culture, it is the title of the 6th chapter of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit". Jim Steinman has written a song called "Out Of The Frying Pan (And Into The Fire)", which appears on his solo album and on Meat Loaf's "Bat Out Of Hell II".

Television

A cooking show "Out of the Frying Pan" aired in 1977, when animal rights campaigners protested against the butchering of a pig live on air.

An episode of Sex and the City is titled 'Out of the Frying Pan', (Season 6, Episode 90)

The Charlie Hoover [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0101060] episode 'Out of the Frying Pan'. (Season 1, Episode 5)

Play

"Out of the Frying Pan" is the title of a 1941 comedy by Francis Swann still often done by amateur companies.

Film

Two films in 1914 went by the name "Out of the Frying Pan" ( [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196819/] and [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0855943/] )

A 1942 animated film is titled" Out of the Frying Pan Into the Firing Line". [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0168114]

Out of the Flying Pan (2001), a short film by Jack S. Kimball. [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0290799/]

Music

Jay Z used the said phrase in his track PSA from his retirement album, "The Black Album".


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  • out of the frying pan, into the fire — If you get out of one problem, but find yourself in a worse situation, you are out of the frying pan, into the fire …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • out of the frying pan into the fire — out of the frying pan (into the fire) from a bad situation to an even worse one. Many kids who run away from unhappy homes discover they ve jumped out of the frying pan into the fire when they try to live on their own. Usage notes: often used… …   New idioms dictionary

  • out of the frying pan into the fire — ► out of the frying pan into the fire from a bad situation to one that is worse. Main Entry: ↑frying pan …   English terms dictionary

  • out of the frying pan into the fire — Out of one trouble into worse trouble; from something bad to something worse. A proverb. * /The movie cowboy was out of the frying pan into the fire. After he escaped from the robbers, he was captured by Indians./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • out of the frying pan into the fire — Out of one trouble into worse trouble; from something bad to something worse. A proverb. * /The movie cowboy was out of the frying pan into the fire. After he escaped from the robbers, he was captured by Indians./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • out of the frying-pan into the fire — Out of one difficult situation into a worse • • • Main Entry: ↑fry …   Useful english dictionary

  • out of the frying pan into the fire — phrasal : clear of one difficulty only to fall into a greater one * * * from a bad situation to one that is worse * * * out of the ˈfrying pan into the ˈfire idiom (saying) from a bad situation to one that is worse Main entry: ↑frying panidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • out\ of\ the\ frying\ pan\ into\ the\ fire — proverb Out of one trouble into worse trouble; from something bad to something worse. The movie cowboy was out of the frying pan into the fire. After he escaped from the robbers, he was captured by Indians …   Словарь американских идиом

  • out of the frying pan, into the fire —    If you get out of one problem, but find yourself in a worse situation, you are out of the frying pan, into the fire.   (Dorking School Dictionary) …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • Out of the frying pan, into the fire —   If you get out of one problem, but find yourself in a worse situation, you are out of the frying pan, into the fire …   Dictionary of English idioms