Table of nuclides (combined)


Table of nuclides (combined)

Isotope colour chart
PLUS = !-
The various tables below (scroll down) show the known isotopes of the chemical elements. [The data for these tables came from Brookhaven National Laboratory which has an interactive [http://www-nds.iaea.org/nudat2/ Table of Nuclides] with data on ~3000 nuclides.] They are arranged with increasing atomic numbers (proton numbers) from left to right and increasing neutron numbers from top to bottom.

For convenience, two different views of the data are available here: "“Segmented tables,”" and a single "“Unitized table (all elements).”" Choose whichever one you need from the table of contents, below. The unitized table allows easy visualizion of proton/neutron-count trends but requires simultaneous horizontal and vertical scrolling. The segmented tables permit easier examination of a particular chemical element with much less scrolling. Links are provided to quickly jump between the different sections.

Note the example color legend shown at right. Legends similar to this are provided alongside each table below. Cell color denotes the half-life of each isotope. If you’ve scrolled so a color legend is not in view, allowing your cursor to dwell over a cell will cause a pop-up text box to indicate that isotope’s half-life.

Cells with colored borders (note the three bottom cells in the color legend at right) denote the half-life of the most stable nuclear isomer state. The color of the border and the associated half-life of the isomer follow the same convention used for isotope half-lives (white, pink, yellow…). In most cases, a cell’s border is different from that of the cell itself. In some cases however—as with the 198Au cell shown here—a cell and its border are the same color so the border’s presence is denoted with a dotted margin. If a cell has a colored border, information on the isomer’s half-life is included in the pop-up text box when your cursor dwells over the cell.

To learn more about nuclides and to obtain a quick tutorial on the distinction between isotopes, isotones, and isobars, see "Table of nuclides".

Periodic table


egmented table

Isotopes for elements 0-14

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Isotopes for elements 15-29

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Isotopes for elements 30-44

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Isotopes for elements 45-59

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Isotopes for elements 60-74

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Isotopes for elements 75-89

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Isotopes for elements 90-104

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Isotopes for elements 105-118

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Unitized table (all elements)

Go to Segmented tableGo to Periodic tableisotope colour chart| nowrap|↖ Go to top of table

References

External links

* An isotope table with clickable information on every isotope and its decay routes is available at [http://chemlab.pc.maricopa.edu/PERIODIC/isotopes.html chemlab.pc.maricopa.edu]
* An example of free Universal Nuclide Chart with decay information for over 3000 nuclides is available at [http://www.nucleonica.net/unc.aspx Nucleonica.net] .
* Links to other charts of nuclides, including printed posters and journal articles, is available at [http://www-nds.iaea.org/indg_nucon.html nds.iaea.org] .


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