Translations of Frère Jacques


Translations of Frère Jacques

The song Frère Jacques is well known in English-speaking countries in both its French and English forms. Many other translations and versions exist; some are an exact structural match to the French version, while others vary in the details to better fit a rhyme scheme, syllable structure, or general euphony.


=In French=

The song is popularly believed to be French in origin, and even in the English-speaking world, it is frequently sung in French (though typically with a somewhat anglicised pronunciation).

Frère Jacques, Frère Jacques,
Dormez-vous? Dormez-vous?
Sonnez les matines! Sonnez les matines!
Ding, dang, dong. Ding, dang, dong.

Rough translation:
Brother Jack, Brother Jack,
Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?
Sound the morning prayer bells! Sound the morning prayer bells!
Din, dan, don. Din, dan, don.

* Another French version, which is slightly less common:

Frère Jacques, Frère Jacques,
Dormez-vous? Dormez-vous?
Sonnent les matines. Sonnent les matines.
Ding-dang-dong. Ding-dang-dong.

Rough translation: Brother James, Brother James, Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping? The morning bells sound! The morning bells sound! Ding Dang Dong. Ding Dang Dong.

* Another less common French version:

Frère Jacques, Frère Jacques,
Dormez-vous? Dormez-vous?
Tous les cloches sonnent, Tous les cloches sonnent,
Ding deng dong. Ding deng dong.

Rough translation: Brother James, Brother James, Are you sleeping? All the bells are ringing, All the bells are ringing, Ding deng dong. Ding deng dong.


=In English=

The most common English language version

Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?
Brother John, Brother John,
Morning bells are ringing, Morning bells are ringing.
Ding, dang, dong, Ding, dang, dong.

Here the first two phrases are reversed, the name is changed to "John" (the literal translation of "Jacques" would be either "Jacob" or "James"), and the third phrase is rendered as "Morning bells are ringing" instead of the imperative "Ring the morning bells" (this last change also is seen in the Dutch translation).

There are many alternative lyrics to Frère Jacques in English, as well as other languages.

Versions in other languages

Some translations and versions include:

In Afrikaans

Vader Jakob, Vader Jakob,
Slaap jy nog? Slaap jy nog?
Hoor hoe lui die kerkklok, Hoor hoe lui die kerkklok,
Ding dong dell, Ding dong dell.


=In Albanian=

Arbër vlla-e, Arbër vlla-e
A po flen? A po flen?
Kumbona ka ra-e, Kumbona ka ra-e
Ding dang dong, Ding dang dong.

In Arabic

اخونا يعقوب اخونا يعقوب
قُم بكير قُم بكير
دُق جرس المدرسة دُق جرس المدرسة
دينج دانج دونج


=In Basque=

Anai xanti, Anai xanti...
ezkilak jotzen du, ezkilak jotzen du
din dan don, din dan don


=In Berber=

gma hassan gma hassan
yalah atgant yalah atgant
arkih youchkad sbah


=In Bulgarian=

Сутрин рано, сутрин рано,
в неделя, в неделя,
камбаните бият, камбаните бият,
бим-бум-бам-бим-бум-бам.

In Moroccan Arabic

Khouya Hassan, khouya Hassan,
Naas mezian, naas mezian ?
Fiksbah bakri, fiksbah bakri
Khalik men lemsah, khalik men lemsah

Alternate lyrics:

Khoya Hassan, Khoya Hassan
Noudo N'a3sso Noudo N'a3sso

In Catalan

Germà Jaume, Germà Jaume.
Estàs dormint? Estàs dormint?
Sonen les campanes, sonen les campanes.
Ding, dang, dong! Ding, dang, dong!

On ets polze?, On ets polze?
Sóc aquí. Sóc aquí.
Gust en saludar-te. Gust en saludar-te.
Ja me'n vaig. Jo també.

In Cantonese

打開蚊帳 打開蚊帳有隻蚊 有隻蚊快啲攞把扇嚟 快啲攞把扇嚟撥走佢 撥走佢


=In Cherokee=

gahliho'i, gahliho'i (Are you sleeping?)
josewi, josewi (Joseph)
ganohalidohi, ganohalidohi (We have to start hunting)
adloyvsga, adloyvsga (so, get up)
ᎦᎵᎰᎢ, ᎦᎵᎰᎢ
ᏦᏎᏫ, ᏦᏎᏫ
ᎦᏃᎭᎵᏙᎯ, ᎦᏃᎭᎵᏙᎯ
ᎠᏠᏴᏍᎦ, ᎠᏠᏴᏍᎦ


=In Chinese=

两只老虎,两只老虎,
跑得快,跑得快,
一只没有耳朵,一只没有尾巴,
真奇怪,真奇怪!

Mandarin transliteration:Liǎng zhī lǎo hǔ, liǎng zhī lǎo hǔ,Pǎo dé kuài, pǎo dé kuài,Yì zhī méi yǒu ěrduō, yì zhī méi yǒu wěibā (wěi bā is often pronounced as yǐ bā - a different dialect of Chinese when sung and in this song as well),Zhēn qíguài, zhēn qíguài!

Translation in english:Two tigers, two tigers,Are running fast, are running fast,One doesn't have ears, one doesn't have a tail,Really strange, really strange!

Another version:三只老虎,三只老虎,
跑得快,跑得快,
一只没有眼睛,一只没有耳朵,
真奇怪,真奇怪!

Mandarin transliteration:Sān zhī lǎo hǔ, sān zhī lǎo hǔ,Pǎo dé kuài, pǎo dé kuài,Yì zhī méi yǒu yǎnjīng, yì zhī méi yǒu ěrduō,Zhēn qíguài, zhēn qíguài!

Translation:Three tigers, three tigers,Are running fast, are running fast,One doesn't have eyes, one doesn't have ears,Really strange, really strange!

Another version:你好,你好,你好,你好
我很好,我很好
我们一起唱歌,我们一起唱歌
真快乐,真快乐

Mandarin transliteration:Nǐ hǎo, nǐ hǎo, nǐ hǎo, nǐ hǎo,Wǒ hěn hǎo, wǒ hěn hǎo,Wǒmen yìqǐ chānggē, wǒmen yìqǐ chānggē, Zhēn kuài lè, zhēn kuài lè

Translation:Hello, Hello, Hello, HelloI am good, I am good,We all sing together, we all sing together,Really happy, really happy


=In Cree=

There is a Cree version called "Kinnipan Tsi."


=In Croatian=

Bratec Martin, Bratec Martin
Kaj još spiš? Kaj još spiš?
Več ti ura tuče, več ti ura tuče
Bim, bam, bom, Bim bam bom.

This version is in the Kajkavian dialect.


=In Czech=

* A version in Czech is:

Bratře Kubo, Bratře Kubo,
Ještě spíš? Ještě spíš?
Venku slunce září, Ty jsi na polštáři,
Vstávej již, Vstávej již.

Translation:

Brother Jacob, Brother Jacob,
Are you still sleeping? Are you still sleeping?
The sun shines outside, and you are on your pillow.
Get up finally, Get up finally.

* Another Czech version is:

Bratře Kubo, Bratře Kubo,
Ještě spíš? Ještě spíš?
"Slunce dávno září,"
"ty jsi na polštáři,"
vstávej již, vstávej již.

Translation: ... / The sun shines for a long time, and you are on your pillow. / ...


=In Danish=

Mester Jakob, Mester Jakob,
Sover du? Sover du?
Hører du ej klokken? Hører du ej klokken?
Bim, bam, bum, Bim, bam, bam.

Translation:

Master John, Master John
Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?
Don’t you hear the bells? Don’t you hear the bells?
Bim, bam, bum, Bim, bam, bam.


=In Dutch=

* A version in Dutch from the Netherlands:

Vader Jakob, Vader Jakob,
Slaapt gij nog? Slaapt gij nog?
Alle klokken luiden, Alle klokken luiden,
Bim bam bom, Bim bam bom.

* In Flanders, children sing:

Broeder Jacob, Broeder Jacob,
Slaapt gij nog? Slaapt gij nog?
Hoor de klokken luiden, hoor de klokken luiden,
Bim Bam Bom, Bim Bam Bom.

A slightly different Dutch version is:

*Vader Jacob, vader Jacob, Slaap jij nog? Slaap jij nog? Alle klokken luiden, alle klokken luiden. Bim, bam, bom, bim, bam, bom [ [http://communities.zeelandnet.nl/data/evelyne/index.php?page=13&showpage=22885 De leukste kinderliedjes...] , Dutch website]

The version with "gij" appears to be more widespread than the version with "jij", as "gij" is still used in Flanders.

Another Dutch version begins:

*Broertje Jacob, broertje Jacob, slaap je nog, slaap je nog...

In Esperanto

* A version in Esperanto is:

Frat’ Jakobo, Frat’ Jakobo,
Ĉu en dorm’? Ĉu en dorm’?
Iru sonorigu, Iru sonorigu,
Bim, bam, bom. Bim, bam, bom.

Translation:

Brother Jacob, Brother Jacob,
Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?
Go and ring. Go and ring.
Bim, bam, bom. Bim, bam, bom.

This version was popular before 1990 probably only in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.

* Another variation of the Esperanto version is:

Ĉu vi dormas, Ĉu vi dormas,
Frato Jak'? Frato Jak'?
[???]
Bim, bam, bom. Bim, bam, bom.

Translation:

Are you sleeping, Are you sleeping,
Brother Jacob? Brother Jacob?
[???]

This version comes from Norway (translation by Jon Rømmesmo). [http://esperanto.org/Ondo/Recenzoj/R-kant1.htm The text ought to be completed.]


=In Estonian=

Sepapoisid, sepapoisid,
teevad tööd, teevad tööd,
taovad tulist rauda, taovad tulist rauda,
päeval ööl, päeval ööl.

Translation:

The blacksmiths, The blacksmiths,
are working, are working,
hammering the hot iron, hammering the hot iron,
day and night, day and night.

In Fakauvea

Felela Sakopo, Felela Sakopo,
Moe, moe koe, moe, moe koe.
Tuu o ta te pele, tuu o ta te pele.
Ding, ding, dong, ding, ding, dong.


=In Faroese=

Dovni Jákup, dovni Jákup
Svevur tú, svevur tú?
Klokkan hon er átta, klokkan hon er átta
Ding-ding-dong, ding-ding-dong.

Translation: Lazy Jacob, / are you sleeping / It is 8 o'clock / ding-ding-dong.


=In Finnish=

* A version in Finnish is:

Jaakko kulta, Jaakko kulta,
Herää jo, Herää jo.
Kellojasi soita, Kellojasi soita.
Piu pau pou, Piu pau pou.

Translation:

Jaakko Dear, Jaakko Dear, Wake up already, Wake up already, Ring your bells, Ring your bells.
Bing, bang, bong, Bing, bang, bong. In the Finnish version, the question "are you sleeping?" is replaced with a command to wake up ("Herää jo").

* A slightly different Finnish version (written in English orthography!):

Yacko Koolta, Yacko Koolta, / Herio, herio. / Kello yasa soita, kello yasa soita, / Pim pom pume, pim pom pume.

The only difference seems to be "Pim pom pume" instead of "Piu pau pou". Maybe "Kellojasi soita" and "Kello yasa soita" are other grammatical forms or the second one is a mistake.

In Gaeilge

Aindí Leisciúil, Aindí Leisciúil,
I do luí, I do luí,
Tá sé in am bricfeasta, Tá sé in am bricfeasta,
Bí i do shuí, Bí i do shuí


=In Gaelic=

adaig shamna, adaig shamna,
an istig, an istig!
oslaictear na síde, oslaictear na síde,
an istig, an istig!


=In German=

* The most common version in German is:

Bruder Jakob, Bruder Jakob,
Schläfst du noch? Schläfst du noch?
Hörst du nicht die Glocken, Hörst du nicht die Glocken?
Ding, dang, dong, Ding, dang, dong.

Translation: Brother John, / are you still sleeping? / Don't you hear the bells? / Ding, dang, dong!

Here and in all the Germanic languages other than English and Dutch, the third line is changed from a command to ring the matins bells to a query, "Don't you hear the bells?"

* Instead of "Bruder Jakob" it is also sung "Meister Jakob" (=Master James).The title "Meister" can suggest an artisan / a craftsman. One theory is that these lyrics are referring to an artisan involved in church construction, travelling on the Way of St. James.
(see: "Les Enfants du Maître Jacques" / »Kinder von Meister Jakob« (=Master James' Children) [http://www.celtoslavica.de/johannesritter/johannesritter.text/johannesritter_kap.3.html , especially point 14-18]

* Another German version:Bruder Jakob, Bruder Jakob, / Schläfst Du noch? Schläfst Du noch? / Morgenglocken läuten, Morgenglocken läuten. / Ding-dang-dong, ding-dang-dong.

Translation: Morgenglocken läuten = Morning bells are ringing.

* In the 19th and at the beginning of the 20th century in Austria, this tune was commonly associated with lyrics referring to a "Bruder Martin" (=Brother Martin) and sung in a minor key (see: Gustav Mahler and his 1st Symphony).


=In Greek (modern)=

Αδελφέ Ιάκωβε, αδελφέ Ιάκωβε
κοιμάσαι, κοιμάσαι
σημάνετέ τον όρθρο, σημάνετέ τον όρθρο,
Ντιν, ντιν, ντονγκ, ντιν, ντιν, ντονγκ,


=In Haitian Creole=

Tonton Bouki, Tonton Bouki,
Ou ap dòmi? Ou ap dòmi?
Lévé pou bat tanbou-a, Lévé pou bat tanbou-a,
Ding ding dong ! Ding ding dong !


=In Hebrew=

אחינו יעקב, אחינו יעקב
אל תישן, אל תישן
הפעמון מצלצל,
דינג דנג דונג, דינג דנג דונג.

Rough translation: Our Brother Jacob, do not sleep, the bell sounds, ding dang dong.

Alternative:

אחינו יעקב אחינו יעקב
קום מוקדם קום מוקדם
את הפעמון צלצל
דינג דאנג דונד

In Hindi

A transliterated version of Frère Jacques in Hindi is:

so rahe ho kya, so rahe ho kya
bhai john? bhai john?
jo soe pachtaaega, jo soe pachtaaega,
ab na karo vishraam, ab na karo vishraam.


=In Hungarian=

János bácsi, János bácsi,
Keljen fel, Keljen fel.
Szólnak a harangok, Szólnak a harangok.
Bim, bam, bom, Bim, bam, bom.

Translation: Uncle John, Uncle John
Get up, Get up,
The bells are ringing, The bells are ringing,
Bim, bam, bom, Bim, bam, bom.

The Hungarian word "bácsi" means "uncle", but it's a form generally used by Hungarians to turn to an older man (especially children to an adult man). The word "mister" is commonly used for this purpose in English.
The Hungarian verb "keljen fel" is the imperative formal form (third person sg.) of the verb "felkel(ni)".


=In Icelandic=

Meistari Jakob, meistari Jakob!
Sefur þú? Sefur þú?
Hvað slær klukkan? Hvað slær klukkan?
Hún slær þrjú. Hún slær þrjú.

Translation:

Master John, Master John!
Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?
What time does the bell strike? What time does the bell strike?
It strikes three o'clock. It strikes three o'clock.


=In Indonesian=

Bapak Jakob, Bapak Jakob,
Masih tidur? Masih tidur?
Dengar lonceng bunyi, Dengar lonceng bunyi
Bim, bam, bum, bim, bam, bum

:or, less literally:

Bruder Jakob,
Bangun-la
Hari suda siang


=In Italian=

*A version in Italian is:

Frà Martino, Campanaro,
Dormi tu? Dormi tu?
Suona le campane, Suona le campane,
Din, don, dan, Din, don, dan.

The name is completely changed ("Giacomo" would be the expected translation) and "Fra Martino"'s position as bell-ringer ("campanaro") is made explicit.

* Another Italian version is:

Translation: Brother Martin, bell-ringer, what are you doing? Don't sleep! Ring for the morning prayer/matins.
Brother Martin, bell-ringer, it's already the midday! Ring merrily!
Brother Martin, bell-ringer, where are you in the evening? Ring silently/softly, it's evening prayer (time)/vespers.
Brother Martin, you are dreaming now, that you are ringing all the bells!
Brother Martin, bell-ringer, are you sleeping? Ring the bells!

* Another Italian version:Fra Giovanni, Fra Giovanni, Dormi tu? Dormi tu? Suona la campana, suona la campana, Din-dan-don, din-dan-don!


=In Japanese=

Nemuino? Nemuino?
Okinasai, okinasai.
Asano kane ga, natte iruyo.
Kin kon kan, kin kon kan.

眠いの?眠いの?
起きなさい、起きなさい。
朝の鐘が、鳴っているよ。
キンコンカン、キンコンカン。

Translation: "Are you sleepy? Are you sleepy? Wake up! Wake up! Morning bells are ringing, kin kon kan, kin kon kan.

In Japanese kindergarten and elementary schools, however, a common game is to think of things which can be mimed/demonstrated using hands in the shape of rock, paper, and scissors. One example:

Guu chokipaa de guu chokipaa de
Nani tsukurou Nani tsukurou
Migite ga guu de
Hidarite ga guu de
Mickey Mouse, Mickey Mouse

グーチョキパーで グーチョキパーで
何作ろう 何作ろう
右手がグーで
左手がグーで
ミッキーマウス、ミッキーマウス

Translation: "What shall we make with rock, scissors, and paper? With the right hand, 'rock'; with the left hand, 'rock': Mickey Mouse! Mickey Mouse!" This would be accompanied with actions of putting the hands in the shape of 'rock' and bringing them up to the head to make Mickey Mouse ears. Other examples are "helicopter" (one hand "rock", the other hand "paper" flat on top of the rock to make blades) and "ramen" (one hand "paper" to make a bowl, the other "scissors" to make chopsticks).

In Korean

* A version in Korean

우리서로 학교길에
만나면 만나면
웃는얼굴 하고 인사나눕시다
얘들아 안녕.

Translation: When we meet on the way to school / let's greet with smale / hello, bye.

In Latin

* A version in Latin:

Quare dormis, O Iacobe,
Etiam nunc? Etiam nunc?
Resonant campanae, Resonant campanae,
Din din dan, Din din dan.

Translation: Why are you sleeping, Jacob, / still now? / (The) bells are ringing. / Din din dan.

* Another Latin version is:

O Iacobe, frater piger,
dormisne? dormisne?
Tinni Matutinum! Tinni Matutinum!
Tin tin tan, tin, tin, tan.

* An alternate Latin version is:

Domne Jane, domne Jane / dormisne? Exsurge! / Omnes nolae sonant, omnes nolae sonant / Bim bam bum, bim bam bum. ["Ludamus una", Mrs. Tiborne Baranyai]


=In Norwegian=

Fader Jakob, Fader Jakob,
Sover du? Sover du?
Hører du ei klokken? Hører du ei klokken?
Ding, dang, dong, Ding, dang, dong

Again, the imperative is replaced with "Can't you hear the bells?". Sometimes replaced with "Klokkene de ringer." (The bells are tolling.) Also, Father is used instead of Brother, which appears to refer to a priest instead of a monk. See religion in Norway.


=In Palikur=

There is a song in the Palikur language sung to the tune of "Frère Jacques" that is entitled "Nah batek"."Nah batek gikak UhokriNah batek. Nah batek.Ig avit nuyakni. Ig avit nuyakni.Nah batek. Nah batek.

In Papiamento

Ruman Jacobo, Ruman Jacobo,
Ainda bo ta drumi? Ainda bo ta drumi?
Tend'e bel ta bati, Tend'e bel ta bati,
Ding ding dong! Ding ding dong!


=In Polish=

*A version in Polish is: Panie Janie, Panie Janie,
Rano wstań, Rano wstań.
Wszystkie dzwony biją, Wszystkie dzwony biją.
Bim, bam, bom, Bim, bam, bom.

Translation:

Mister John, Mister John, Get up in the morning, Get up in the morning, All the bells are ringing, All the bells are ringing, Bim, bam, bom, Bim, bam, bom.

*Another Polish version:Panie Janie, Panie Janie,
pora wstać, pora wstać.
Wszystkie dzwony biją, wszystkie dzwony biją.
Bim, bam, bom, Bim, bam, bom.

Translation: Mister John (2x) / time to get up (2x)/ All the bells are ringing (2x) / Bim, bam, bom(2x)


=In Portuguese=

* The more accurate Portuguese translation:

Estás dormindo, estás dormindo?
Frei João, Frei João
Vai tocar o sino, vai tocar o sino
Dlim, dlim, dlão.

* A version in Portuguese is:

Por que dormes, irmãozinho?
Vem brincar, vem brincar!
Ouve o sininho, longe crepitando
Din din don, din din don

* Another Portuguese version:

Irmão Jorge, irmão Jorge,
dorme tu, dorme tu?
Já soam os sinos, já soam os sinos.
Ding dang dong, ding dang dong.

* Another version in Portuguese is titled "Irmão Joaquim".

There are also Brazilian-portuguese versions:

* Brazilian Version #1:

Frei João, Frei João,
A dormir, a dormir?
Vá tocar os sinos, vá tocar os sinos.
Din din don, din din don

* Brazilian Version #2:

Irmão João, Irmão João,
Está a dormir, Está a dormir?
Vá tocar os sinos, vá tocar os sinos.
Matinais, matinais.

* Brazilian Version #3:Por que choras, irmãozinho?
Vem brincar, vem brincar
Ouve os sininhos, ouve os sininhos
A soar, A soar

In Provençal

Fraire Jaume, Fraire Jaume,
Dormissètz? Dormissètz?
Sòna la campana, Sòna la campana,
Din, den, dòn ! Din, den, dòn !


=In Romanian=

* A version in Romanian: [O versiune în Română]

Frate Ioane, Frate Ioane
Oare dormi tu, oare dormi tu?
Sună clopoţelul, Sună clopoţelul
Ding dang dong, ding dang dong

* Another Romanian version: [O altă versiune în Română]

Tu dormi înca, tu dormi înca,
Frate Ioane, Frate Ioane?
Clopoţelul sună, clopoţelul sună.
Clinc clinc clinc, clinc clinc clinc.


=In Russian=

* A version in Russian:

Брат Иван! Эй! Брат Иван! Эй!
Спишь ли ты? Спишь ли ты?
Звонят в колокольчик, Звонят в колокольчик,
Динь-динь-динь, Динь-динь-динь.

Translation: Brother Ivan, / are you sleeping? / The bell (or: a bell) is ringing. (Literally: They ring the bell (or: a bell).) / Din'-din'-din'.
Ivan is of course the Russian name for our "John".

Transliteration:
Brat Ivan! Ei, Brat Ivan! Ei,
Spysh li ty? Spysh li ty?
Zvonjat v kolokol'chik, Zvonjat v kolokol'chik:
Din' din' din', din' din' din!

This version is probably the best known in Europe because it appears as part of the multilingual song "Alle wecken Bruder Jakob" (roughly translated as "All wake brother Jakob") which is sung by Rolf Zuckowski. This German musician gives concerts in many countries and also sells CDs of his performances. The transliterated text can be found on an Italian web site. [ [http://www.filastrocche.it/nostalgici/canzoni/fra.htm Fra' martino - Versioni Internazionali] , Italian website with several versions of Frère Jacques in different languages. ]

* A very similar (transliterated) Russian version is: [ [http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0202&L=seelangs&D=1&F=&S=&P=6408 "Brat Ivan (Kanon)" ] , Mischa A. Fayer, "Basic Russian: Book One", 1985 (posted to linguist listserv Slavic & East European Languages and Literature list by Jeff Holdeman of The Ohio State University, Tue, 12 Feb 2002) ] Brat Ivan, brat Ivan,
Spish' li ty, spish' li ty?
Zvoni v kolokola, zvoni v kolokola,
Din', din', din', din', din', din'

Which should be written in Russian:

Брат Иван, Брат Иван,
Спишь ли ты? Спишь ли ты?
Звони в колокола, Звони в колокола,
Динь-динь-динь, Динь-динь-динь.

This version comes from the book: "Basic Russian: Book One" by Mischa A. Fayer (1985, p. 255 ).It isn't sure if this song is an original Russian song. It is also possible that the author has translated the English song for Americans (???) learning Russian.

The difference is "Звони в колокола" [Zvoni v kolokola] (=Ring the bell) instead of "Звонят в колокольчик" [Zvonjat v kolokol'chik] (=The bell (or: a bell) is ringing.) The next difference is that one syllable after the words "Brat Ivan" is missing. The first version with the interjection "Эй!" [Ei!] corresponds better with the tune.

* Another Russian transliterated version is:

Bratets Jakow, bratets Jakow,
Spish li ti, spish li ti?
Slishish zwon na bashne, slishish zwon na bashne?
Ding dang dong, ding dang dong.

Which should be written in Russian:

Братец Иаков, Братец Иаков,
Спишь ли ты? Спишь ли ты?
Слышишь звон на башне? Слышишь звон на башне?
Дин-дан-дон, Дин-дан-дон.

Translation: Brother Jacob (or: James), / are you sleeping? / Do you hear the bell on the tower? / Din-dan-don.

The name "Jacob" can be written in Russian as "Иаков" or "Яков".
"Братец" [bratets] means a "little brother", but it dosn't mean the age or the growth. It's a familiar way of turning to a brother, e.g. a monk.

This transliterated version comes from a German multilingual songbook. [ [http://www.laukart.de/multisite/songbook/russian.php#sleeping "Bratez Jakow"] , Russian Songbook, "Multilingual Songbook - Children Songs in many languages" ] It has been transliterated for English speaker, but the first word there is "bratez" instead of "bratets" - Germans read "z" as [ts] .)

* Still another Russian version is: [ [http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0202&L=seelangs&D=1&F=&S=&P=6408 "Diadia Iakov (or Pop Martyn)"] , posted by Svetlana Grenier of Georgetown University to linguist listserv Slavic & East European Languages and Literature list, Tue, 12 Feb 2002 ]

Дядя Яков, Дядя Яков,
Что ты спишь? Что ты спишь?
Колокол ударил, Колокол ударил,
Дин-дон-дон, Дин-дон-дон.

which can be transliterated as:

Diadia Iakov, Diadia Iakov,
Chto ty spish'? Chto ty spish'?
Kolokol udaril, kolokol udaril:
Din-don-don, din-don-don.

Translation: Uncle (or: Mister) Jacob (or: James), / why are you sleeping? / The bell has been rung. / Ding-Dang-Dong. The Russian word "дядя" [diadia] means "uncle", but it's a form generally used by Russians to turn to an older man (especially children to an adult man). This version also can take "Поп Мapтын" [Pop Martyn] (=Pope Martin in English) as its subject. The word "поп" [pop] means a clergyman / priest in the Orthodox Church.

The person who has contributed both versions lives in America. It isn't sure if she has heard them in America or in Russia.

* Another Russian version: [ [http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0202&L=seelangs&P=6872 "bratets Iakov"] , posted by David Vernikov to Slavic & East European Languages and Literature list, Tue, 12 Feb 2002 ]

Aх, какoй жe, Братец Иаков,
Ты лентяй, ты лентяй,
Если по неделе, Ты лежишь в постели,
Ай, ай, ай! Ай, ай, ай!

Как поднимем Поскорее
Звон-трезвон, Звон-тревон,
И заставим братца, Делом заниматься,
Дин дон дон, Дин дон дон.

This is transliterated as:

Akh kakoi zhe, bratets Iakov,
Ty lentiai, ty lentiai,
Esli po nedele, Ty lezhish' v posteli
Ai, ai, ai! Ai, ai, ai!

Kak podnimem poskoree
Zvon-trezvon, zvon-trezvon,
I zastavim brattsa, Delom zanimat'sia.
Din don don, din don don.

Translation: Oh, how lazy are you, (little) brother Jacob (or: James), / if during the week / you're lying in your bed! / Oh, oh, oh!
We will soon raise / the bell-chimes, / and then make our (little) brother, / get to his work. / Ding Dang Dong.

Another version is:

Братец Яков, Братец Яков
Спишь ли ты? Спишь ли ты?
Ведь звонят к обедне, Ведь звонят к обедне,
Бим бам бом, Бим бам бом.


=In Serbian=

Драги бато, драги бато,
Спаваш ли? Спаваш ли?
Већ звона сва звоне, већ звона сва звоне,
Динг, денг, донг! Динг, денг, донг!

In Slovenian

Mojster Jaka, mojster Jaka,
al' že spiš, al' že spiš,
Al' ne slišiš zvona? Al' ne slišiš zvona?
Bim, bam, bom. Bim, bam, bom.

Translation:

Master Jacob, Master Jacob,
Are you still sleeping? Are you still sleeping?
Don't you hear the bell? Don't you hear the bell?
Ding, dang, dong. Ding, dang, dong.

Two versions exist, which differ slightly in the second line: "Al' že spiš?" (literally: "Are you sleeping already?") versus "Al' še spiš?" ("Are you still sleeping?"). Even though the second one is semantically correct, the first version is much more common.


=In Spanish=

* A version in Spanish:

¡Fray Felipe!¡Fray Felipe!
¿Duermes tú? ¿Duermes tú?
Suenan las campanas, Suenan las campanas.
¡Ding, dang, dong! ¡Ding, dang, dong!

:"Some dialects use "Tocan las campanas"

* Another variation Spanish version is:

¡Martinillo! ¡Martinillo!
¿Dónde estás? ¿Dónde estás?
Suenan las campanas, Suenan las campanas.
¡Din, don, dan! ¡Din, don, dan!

While the first version is closer to the French, this version uses the same name (Martinillo) as the Italian. It also asks, not whether Martinillo is sleeping ("¿Duermes tú?"), but where he is ("¿Dónde estás? ").

Other Spanish versions:
* Fray Santiago, / ¿Duerme usted? / ¡Suenas las campanas! / ¡ Ding, dong, dan !
* Fray Francisco, / ¿Duermes tú? / ¡Suena la campana! / ¡ Din, don, dan !
* Panadero, / ¿Ya está el pan? / Dámelo caliente. / Ding, dong, dang.
* La lechuza, / hace ¡shh! / Todos calladitos, / por favor.
**note: This variation is frequently used in kindergartens to call the children to naptime. This version is the one sung by the owl, "La lechuza", Dora and Boots on episode 204 of "Dora the Explorer" entitled "Something's missing".
* ¡Buenos dias! / ¿Como estas? / ¡Tocan las companas! / Ding-dang-dong!
* ¡Muy buen día! / ¡tenga usted! / Toca la campan / ding, dan, don
* Fray Felipe, / ¿Duermes tu? / Toca las companas, / Ding dang dong.
* Fray Santiago, / ¿Duermes ya, duermes ya? / Suenan las campanas, / Din, don, dan.
** Note: This variation is most common in the Argentinian Spanish dialect:
* Martinillo, / ¿Donde está? / Toca la campana, / Din, don, dan, din, don, dan
* Campanero / duerme ya, / toca la campana, / ding dong dand


=In Swahili=

Eh Yakobo, Eh Yakobo,
Walala? Walala?
Amka twende shule, Amka twende shule,
Haya njoo, Haya njoo.


=In Swedish=

* A version in Swedish is:

Broder Jakob, Broder Jakob,
Sover du? Sover du?
Hör du inte klockan? Hör du inte klockan?
Ding, ding, dong, Ding, ding, dong

An alternative version exists, where "Hör du inte klockan?" ("Don't you hear the bell?") is replaced with "Ring i dina klockor!" ("Ring your bells!"). The former is more common, however.

* Another Swedish version: (This one is not as common though.)

Broder Jacob, broder Jacob
sover du, sover du?
Väckarklockan ringer, Väckarklockan ringer,
Ding dang dong, Ding dang dong.


=In Tagalog=

A transliterated version of "Frère Jacques" in Tagalog is:

Kuya Juan, Kuya Juan,
Natutulog ka pa? Natutulog ka pa?
Ang kapmana'y tumutunog, Ang kampana'y tumutunog
Ding dang dong, ding dang dong.


=In Tamil=

A transliterated version of Frère Jacques in Tamil is:

Djaqueu thambi, Djaqueu thambi
Toungappa? Toungappa?
Manihadi thambi! Manihadi thambi!
Ding, Dong, Bell, Ding, Dong, Bell

Rough translation: Brother James, Are you sleeping? Sound the morning bells little one ! Ding Dong Bell.

or

Chinna Muthu, chinna muthu
Nithiraiyo?, nithiraiyo?
Mani adikirathu! mani adikirathu!
Elumbungo, elumbungo

Rough translation: Small brother, Are you sleeping? The bells are ringing! Please get up.


=In Thai=

A transliterated version of Frère Jacques in Thai is:

Puak tur yu nai, puak tur yu nai,
yu nai camp, yu nai camp?
Tam mai mai ma sanuk kan, Tam mai mai ma sanuk kan,
Din dan don, din dan don.


=In Turkish=

The popular version of this rhyme in Turkish:

Tembel çocuk, tembel çocuk
Haydi kalk, haydi kalk
İşte sabah oldu, işte sabah oldu
Gün doğdu, gün doğdu.

The literal translation back to English of this version reads:

Lazy child, lazy child
Get up already, get up already
It's morning now, it's morning now
The sun is up, the sun is up.

An alternate translation that's more in line with the original version goes as follows (but is less popular due to "Sabah Çanlari" or "Morning Bells" not being a concept that is familiar to kids):

Uyuyor musun, uyuyor musun,
kardeş Can, kardeş Can?
Sabah Çanlari Çaliyor, Sabah Çanlari Çaliyor,
Ding dang dong, ding dang dong.


=In Ukrainian=

Брате Йване, брате Йване,
Чи ти спиш, чи ти спиш,
Чи ти чуєш дзвони? Чи ти чуєш дзвони?
Дінь-дінь-дон.

English translation

Brother Jvan, brother Jvan,
Do you sleep? Do you sleep?
Do you hear the bells?
Ding-ding-don.


=In Vietnamese=

The Vietnamese version is known as a song for children, as its content is different from the original one. Almost any Vietnamese child today knows how to sing it.Fact|date=September 2008

Kìa con bướm vàng, kìa con bướm vàng.
Xòe đôi cánh, xòe đôi cánh.
Tung cánh bay năm ba vòng, tung cánh bay năm ba vòng.
Ra mà xem, ra mà xem.

English translationThat's a yellow butterfly, That's a yellow butterfly,
Stretching its wings, Stretching its wings
It flies a few rounds,It flies a few rounds,
Come and see, come and see.

An alternative version:
Kìa con bướm vàng, kìa con bướm vàng.
Xòe đôi cánh, xòe đôi cánh.
Bướm bướm vui bay trong vườn, bướm bướm vui bay trong vườn.
Em ngồi xem, em ngồi xem.

That's a yellow butterfly, That's a yellow butterfly,
Stretching its wings, Stretching its wings
It is flying in the garden, It is flying in the garden
I'm watching. I'm watching.


=In Wolof=

Sama raka modou, sama raka modou,
Yéwougham, Yéwougham,
Gnoundé yayou diné, gnoundé yayou diné,
Ding dong dong, Ding dong dong.


=In Xhosa=

Utata uJacob, Utata uJacob
Usalele, Usalele
Mamela intsimbi iyakhala, Mamela intsimbi iyakhala
Dieng dong del, Dieng dong del


=In Zulu=

Baba Jacob, Baba Jacob
Usalela, Usalela
Amasilongo esonto ayakhala, Amasilongo esonto ayakhala
Ding dong del, Ding dong del

Bell sounds in French

There are clearly many different descriptions of the sound of the bells in different languages. However, even in French versions of "Frère Jacques" there are a variety of sounds attributed to a set of bells:

#Din, dan, don.
#Ding, dang dong.
#din, din, don.
#Ding deng dong.
#ding, din, don.
#Di, din, don.
#Dig, ding, don.
#Dingue, dingue, donc.
#Din, don, dan.

References

External links

* [http://demonsaumonde.free.fr/frere.jacques/ a "Frère Jacques" multilingual collection on video]
* [http://www.ncca.ie/uploadedfiles/Publications/Intercultural.pdf An intercultural teaching document with some translations]
* [http://ingeb.org/Lieder/bruderja.html A German song book with some translations]
* [http://www.laukart.de/multisite/index.php A multilingual songbook]
* [http://lirama.net/song/36679/36356+36357+36369+36350+36371+36363+36372+36365+36354+36361+36368+36351+36366+36352 Many versions of Frère Jacques in different languages]
* [http://www.singsang.com/pdf/fader_jacob_29.pdf Frère Jacques lyrics in different languages]
* [http://dragon.sleepdeprived.ca/songbook/songs2/s2_26.htm Another website with Frère Jacques lyrics in different languages]


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