Departments of Bolivia


Departments of Bolivia

Bolivia is divided into nine departments (Spanish: departamentos). Each of the departments is subdivided into provinces (provincias), which are further subdivided into municipalities (municipios).

Departments are governed by the elected governors (until 2010, prefects; and until 2005, appointed by the President) and by independently elected Departmental Legislative Assemblies (until 2010; Departmental Councils).

Bolivia's nine departments received greater autonomy under the Administrative Decentralization law of 1995. Departmental autonomy further increased with the first popular elections for departmental governors, known as prefects, on 18 December 2005. Four departments (Santa Cruz, Beni, Pando and Tarija) voted for greater autonomy in 2005, and without constitutional authorization, passed statutes of autonomy in 2008.[1] The remaining five departments approved departmental autonomy in the general elections of 2009.

Contents

Department statistics

Departments of Bolivia
Department Abbreviation Population Area (km²) Density Capital (Pop.) Map Flag
Total Bolivia BOL 10,027,644 1,098,581 9.1 Sucre (Constitutional)
Nuestra Señora de La Paz (Seat of Government)
Bolivia departments named.png Flag of Bolivia.svg
Beni BNI 430,049 213,564 1.9 Trinidad (86,385) Bolivia-Beni.png Flag of beni.svg
Chuquisaca CHQ 631,062 51,524 11.9 Sucre (280,259) Bolivia-Chuquisaca.png Flag of chuquisaca.svg
Cochabamba CBB 1,786,040 55,631 22.7 Cochabamba (586,813) Bolivia-Cochabamba.png Flag of cochabamba.svg
La Paz LPZ 2,756,989 133,985 19.9 Nuestra Señora de La Paz (835,000) Bolivia-La Paz.png Bandera de La Paz.svg
Oruro ORU 444,093 53,558 8.2 Ciudad de Oruro (281,700) Bolivia-Oruro.png Flag of oruro.svg
Pando PND 75,335 63,827 1.1 Cobija (32,217) Bolivia-Pando.png Flag of pando.svg
Potosí PSI 780,392 118,218 6.5 Ciudad de Potosí (149,246) Bolivia-Potosi.png Flag of potosi.svg
Santa Cruz SCZ 2,626,697 370,621 7.1 Santa Cruz de la Sierra (1,638,343) Bolivia-Santa Cruz.png Flag of santacruz.svg
Tarija TJA 496,988 37,623 12.5 Ciudad de Tarija (170,906) Bolivia-Tarija.png Flag of tarija.svg
Source: Demographic Projections 2008, INE.[2] Population density calculated based on 2006 population projections.

See also

References

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bolivia — This article is about the South American country. For other uses, see Bolivia (disambiguation). Plurinational State of Bolivia Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia …   Wikipedia

  • Bolivia — • Includes history, geography, education, church, and government information Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Bolivia     Bolivia     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Bolivia — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Bulibya Mamallaqta (quechua) Wuliwya Suyu (aymara) Tetã Volívia (guaraní) Estado Plurinacional de …   Wikipedia Español

  • Bolivia — Bolivian, adj., n. /beuh liv ee euh, boh /; Sp. /baw lee vyah/, n. 1. a republic in W South America. 7,669,868; 404,388 sq. mi. (1,047,370 sq. km). Caps.: La Paz and Sucre. 2. (often l.c.) a twill fabric made of cut pile with lines either in the… …   Universalium

  • Bolivia — <p></p> <p></p> Introduction ::Bolivia <p></p> Background: <p></p> Bolivia, named after independence fighter Simon BOLIVAR, broke away from Spanish rule in 1825; much of its subsequent history has… …   The World Factbook

  • Departments of Paraguay — Paraguay This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Paraguay …   Wikipedia

  • Departments of Colombia — Colombia This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Colombia …   Wikipedia

  • Departments of Argentina — Argentina This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Argentina Constitution Government …   Wikipedia

  • Departments of Uruguay — Uruguay …   Wikipedia

  • Bolivia, flag of — ▪ Flag History       horizontally striped red yellow green national flag that incorporates the national coat of arms (arms, coat of) when it is flown by the government. It has a width to length ratio of 2 to 3.       In colonial times Bolivia was …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.