GE Aviation


GE Aviation

Infobox Company
company_name = GE Aviation
company_
company_type = Division
foundation = 1917" [http://www.geaviation.com/aboutgeae/history.html GE Aviation: History] ." GE Aviation website.]
location =
key_people = David L. Joyce, President & CEO
Russel F. Sparks, Vice President & General Manager, Military Systems Operation
Charles P. Blankenship, Vice President & General Manager, Commercial Engines
Scott Ernest, Vice President & General Manager, Supply Chain
Jeanne Rosario, Vice President & General Manager, Engineering
Stephen J. Sedita, CFO
John M. Seral, Vice President, CIO
Jack F. Ryan, Vice President, Human Resources
industry = Aerospace
products = Aircraft engines
Avionics (with Smiths)
revenue = US$$13.2 billion (2006)" [http://www.geaviation.com/aboutgeae/presscenter/other/other_20070115.html GE To Acquire Smiths Aerospace, Extending Aviation Offerings; Plans JV with Smiths Group To Build Global Detection Business] ." GE Aviation official press release. January 15, 2007.]
num_employees = 26,800 (2007)
37,800 (with Smiths)
parent = General Electric
subsid = Aviation Systems" [http://www.smiths-aerospace.com/News/Archive/2007/GE-Aviatio/index.asp GE Aviation Completes Acquisition of Smiths Aerospace] ." Smiths Aerospace press release. May 4, 2007.]
Walter Engines" [http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121504534225725021.html GE Takes On Jet-Engine Rival] ." "The Wall Street Journal". July 3, 2008.]
GE Honda (50%)
CFM International (50%)
Engine Alliance (50%)
homepage = [http://www.geaviation.com/ geaviation.com]
footnotes =

GE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, is headquartered in Evendale, Ohio (a Cincinnati suburb). GE Aviation is the top supplier of aircraft engines in the world and offers engines for the majority of commercial aircraft. GE Aviation is part of GE Infrastructure, itself a major part of the conglomerate General Electric, one of the world's largest corporations. The division operated under the name of General Electric Aircraft Engines or GEAE until September 2005.

History

In 1942, General Electric developed the first US jet engine in Lynn, Massachusetts. The Lynn facility continues to assemble jet engines for the United States Department of Defense, subsidiary services and commercial operators. Engines assembled at this plant include the F404, F414, T700, and CFE738 military power plants. The plant at Lynn also produces the -3 and -8 variants of the CF34 regional jet engine, the CT7 commercial turboprop power plant and commercial versions of the T700 (also CT7).

The Evendale plant conducts final assembly for the CFM International's CFM56, CF6, as well as LM6000, and LM2500 power plants.

The Durham, North Carolina facility conducts final assembly for the GE90 and CF34 power plants. Crucial parts for these engines are crafted in secondary GEAE facilities, such as those in Bromont, Quebec; Hooksett, New Hampshire; Wilmington, North Carolina; Madisonville, Kentucky and Rutland, Vermont; where the engine blades and vanes are manufactured.

GE Aviation's main competitors in the engine market are Rolls-Royce and Pratt & Whitney. Snecma has significant interests in the GE Aviation civil engine range - having an equal share of CFM International which was established thirty years ago and major stake holdings in other engine families. GE Aviation is also a partner with Honda Motor Company in the GE Honda joint venture.

Then-GEAE (and competitor Rolls-Royce) were selected by Boeing to power its new 787. GE Aviation's offering is the GEnx, a development of the GE90. GE Aviation also has two-year exclusivity on the Boeing 747-8.

Smiths Group and General Electric announced on January 15, 2007 that the former was divesting Smiths Aerospace to the latter for GBP£2.4 billion (US$ 4.8 billion)." [http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20070115-703428.html Smiths To Sell Aerospace Ops To GE For $4.8B] ." McGrath, S.; Stone, R. "The Wall Street Journal". January 15, 2007.] GE Aviation closed the transaction on May 4, 2007. Smiths Aerospace, which was an important supplier, became an operating subsidiary of GE Aviation known as GE Aviation Systems. This acquisition will reportedly give the combined unit the clout to resist pricing pressures from its two largest customers, Boeing Commercial Airplanes and EADS Airbus. Analysts further assert that it will enable General Electric to acquire assets similar to those which it desired in its failed bid for Honeywell in 2000.

Along with the purchase of Smiths Aerospace, the purchase included opening the first University Development Center in Houghton, Michigan, in the effort to work with University Students to provide training in engineering and software development. The program has performed well and GE Aviation has announced further UDC openings at the University of Kansas.

In July 2008, governments in the Persian Gulf reached agreements with GE to expand engine maintenance operations there. The Wall Street Journal reported that Mubadala Development Company, which owns Abu Dhabi Aircraft Technologies, an overhaul and maintenance company, sgned an agreement worth an estimated $8 billion with GE; Abu Dhabi Aircraft Technologies will maintain and overhaul GE engines used in commercial aircraft purchased by airlines based in the Persian Gulf. [Mideast Widens Aircraft Ventures, Wall Street Journal, July 30, 2008, p.B2]

Engine range

Turbojets

* J31 (I-A and I-16) (1942-45)
** Bell P-59
** Ryan FR-1

* J33 (I-40), with later production by Allison (1945)
** Lockheed P-80/F-80
** Lockheed T-33

* J35, with later production by Allison (1946)
** Bell X-5
** Boeing XB-47
** Convair XB-46
** Douglas XB-43 Jetmaster
** Martin XB-48
** North American XB-45
** Northrop B-49
** Northrop F-89 Scorpion
** Republic F-84 Thunderjet

* J47 (1948)
** Boeing XB-29G Superfortress
** Boeing KB-50J Superfortress
** Boeing KC-97 Stratotanker
** Boeing B-47 Stratojet
** Convair B-36 'Peacemaker'
** Curtiss-Wright XF-87 Blackhawk
** Martin XB-51
** North American B-45 Tornado
** North American F-86 Sabre
** Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor

* J79/CJ805 (1955)
**Convair 880
**Convair 990
**Convair B-58 Hustler
**IAI F-21 Kfir
**Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
**McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II
**North American A-5 Vigilante
**Sud Aviation Caravelle

*J85/CJ610 (1958)
**McDonnell ADM-20 Quail
**Aero Commander 1121 Jet Commander
**HFB-320 Hansa Jet
**Learjet 23
**Learjet 25
**Learjet 28/29
**Northrop T-38 Talon
**Northrop F-5 Freedom Fighter/Tiger II
**Scaled Composites White Knight

Light and low-bypass turbofans

*CF700

*F101 (1970)
**Rockwell B-1 Lancer

*General Electric TF34/CF34 (1972)
**Bombardier CRJ-700 and CRJ-900
**Bombardier Challenger
**Embraer E170/175/190/195
**Fairchild-Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
**Lockheed S-3 Viking

* F404 (1978)
** Boeing F/A-18A/B/C/D Hornet
** Boeing X-45C
** Dassault Rafale (During development)
** Grumman YA-6F Intruder
** Grumman X-29
** HAL Tejas
** Israel Aircraft Industries Kfir-C2 "Nammer"
** Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk
** McDonnell Douglas/ Singapore Aerospace A-4SU Super Skyhawk
** Northrop F-20 Tigershark
** Rockwell-MBB X-31
** Saab JAS-39 Gripen

*F110 (1984)
**Grumman F-14 Tomcat
**Boeing F-15K/F-15SG
**Lockheed Martin F-16C/D Fighting Falcon

*F118 (1989)
**Northrop B-2 Spirit
**Lockheed U-2

* YF120, cancelled, basis for F136 (1989)
** Lockheed Martin/Boeing F-22 Raptor
** Northrop YF-23 Black Widow II

*CFE738, with Honeywell (?)
**Dassault Falcon 2000

* F412 (cancelled)
** McDonnell Douglas A-12 Avenger II

* F414 (1995)
** Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet
** EADS Mako/HEAT
** JAS 39 Gripen Demonstrator

*F136, with Rolls-Royce (?)
**Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II

*HF120, with Honda (2003?)
**Honda HA-420 HondaJet

High-bypass turbofans

* TF39/CF6/F103 family
**TF39 (1968)
***Lockheed C-5 Galaxy
**CF6-6 (1970)
***McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10
**CF6-50 (1972)
***Airbus A300
***Boeing 747-200/300
***Boeing E-4B
***McDonnell Douglas DC-10-15/DC-10-30
***McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender
**CF6-80 (1981)
***Airbus A300-600/A300-600ST
***Airbus A310
***Airbus A330
***McDonnell Douglas MD-11
***Northop Grumman/Airbus KC-45
***Boeing 747-400
***Boeing 767
***Boeing E-10 MC2A
***Boeing VC-25A (Air Force One)
***Lockheed C-5M Super Galaxy, re-engined C-5 Galaxy

*CFM56/F108, with Snecma (1982)
**Airbus A320 family
**Airbus A340-200/-300
**Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker - Re-engined KC-135
**Boeing E-6 Mercury
**Boeing 737 (737-300 variants and newer)
**Boeing P-8 Poseidon
**Boeing 737 AEW&C 'Wedgetail'
**Boeing E-3 Sentry (UK, France and Saudi Arabia)
** Douglas DC-8 Super 70

*GE90 (1995)
**Boeing 777

*GP7200, with Pratt & Whitney (2006)
**Airbus A380

*GEnx (2007)
**Airbus A350 (subject to Airbus' redesigning this aircraft)
** Boeing 747-8
** Boeing 787

Turboprops/propfans

*CT7
**CASA/IPTN CN-235
**Saab 340
**Sukhoi Su-80
**Walter Engines M601 (as of 2008)

* GE36 (?)
** 7J7 (cancelled)

*T407 (?)
**Lockheed P-7

* T-31
**XF2R Dark Shark

Turboshafts

*T700/CT7 (1978)
**AgustaWestland EH101 Merlin/CH-149 Cormorant
**Bell 214ST
**Bell AH-1W/Z SuperCobra/Viper
**Bell YAH-63
**Bell UH-1Y Venom
**Boeing AH-64 Apache
**Boeing-Vertol YUH-61
**Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite
**Lockheed/AgustaWestland/Bell VH-71 Kestrel (Marine One)
**NHI NH90
**Sikorsky S-70/UH-60 Black Hawk/SH-60 Seahawk
**Sikorsky S-92/H-92 Superhawk/CH-148 Cyclone

*T58 (1953)
**Boeing-Vertol H-46 Sea Knight; BV/KV 107-II
**H-3 Sea King
**Bell UH-1F Iroquois
**Sikorsky S-72

*T64 (1964)
**Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion/Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low
**H-53E Super Stallion

*GE38 (2011)
**Sikorsky CH-53K Super Stallion

Vehicle Propulsion

*LV100, with Honeywell
**M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank

Industrial aero-derivative and marine propulsion

*LM500 - Derived from GE TF34
*LM1600 - Derived from GE F404
*LM2500 - Derived from GE TF39 and CF6-50
**"Arleigh Burke" class AEGIS destroyers
**Spruance family destroyers and cruisers:
***"Spruance" class destroyers
***"Kidd" class area air defense destroyers
***"Ticonderoga" class AEGIS cruisers
**"Oliver Hazard Perry" class frigates
*LM6000 - Derived from GE CF6-80
*LMS100 - Derived from GE LM6000 and Frame Gas Turbine

See also

* AlgaeLink
* University Development Center

References

External links

* [http://www.geaviation.com GE Aviation web site]


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