Reconstruction Act


Reconstruction Act

After the end of the Civil War, as part of the on-going process of Reconstruction, the United States Congress passed four statutes known as Reconstruction Acts (March 2, 1867 (39 Cong. Ch. 153; 14 Stat. 428), March 23, 1867 (40 Cong. Ch. 6; 15 Stat. 2), July 19, 1867 (40 Cong. Ch. 30; 15 Stat. 14), March 11, 1868 (ch. 25, 15 Stat. 25)).The acts' main points included:
* Creation of five military districts in the seceded states not including Tennessee, which had ratified the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution and was readmitted to the Union
* Required congressional approval for new state constitutions (which were required for Confederate states to rejoin the Union)
* Confederate states gave voting rights to " all " men.
* All states must ratify the 14th Amendment.
Andrew Johnson’s vetoes of these measures were overridden by Congress, repeating a familiar pattern.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reconstruction Era of the United States — In the history of the United States, the term Reconstruction Era has two senses: the first covers the entire nation in the period 1865–1877 following the Civil War; the second one, used in this article, covers the transformation of the Southern… …   Wikipedia

  • Reconstruction era of the United States — In the history of the United States, Reconstruction refers to the time between 1863 and 1877 when the U.S. focused on abolishing slavery, destroying the Confederacy, and reconstructing the nation and the Constitution. Reconstruction is also the… …   Wikipedia

  • Reconstruction — Re con*struc tion ( str?k sh?n), n. 1. The act of constructing again; the state of being reconstructed. [1913 Webster] 2. (U.S. Politics) The act or process of reorganizing the governments of the States which had passed ordinances of secession,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reconstruction of automobile destruction — was a psychological study carried out by Elizabeth Loftus and Palmer in 1974 [ [http://www.qeliz.ac.uk/psychology/Loftus%20and%20Palmer.htm Loftus + Palmer (1974) ] ] . The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not an eye witness s… …   Wikipedia

  • Reconstruction (law) — Reconstruction in law refers typically to the transfer of a company s (or several companies ) business to a new company. The old company will get put into liquidation, and shareholders will agree to take shares of equivalent value in the new… …   Wikipedia

  • reconstruction — [rē΄kənstruk′shən] n. 1. a) the act of reconstructing b) something reconstructed 2. [R ] the process, after the Civil War, of reorganizing the Southern states which had seceded and reestablishing them in the Union 3. [R ] the period of this (1867 …   English World dictionary

  • reconstruction — Act of constructing again. It presupposes the nonexistence of the thing to be reconstructed, as an entity; that the thing before existing has lost its entity. Miller Hatcheries v. Buckeye Incubator Co., C.C.A.MO., 41 F.2d 619. Also the name… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Reconstruction Finance Corporation — The Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) was an independent agency of the United States government chartered during the administration of Herbert Hoover in 1932. It was modeled after the War Finance Corporation of World War I. The agency gave …   Wikipedia

  • reconstruction — reconstructional, reconstructionary, adj. /ree keuhn struk sheuhn/, n. 1. an act of reconstructing. 2. (cap.) U.S. Hist. a. the process by which the states that had seceded were reorganized as part of the Union after the Civil War. b. the period… …   Universalium

  • Reconstruction Acts — After the end of the Civil War, as part of the on going process of Reconstruction, the United States Congress passed four statutes known as Reconstruction Acts (March 2, 1867 (39 Cong. Ch. 153; 14 Stat. 428), March 23, 1867 (40 Cong. Ch …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.