County Tyrone


County Tyrone
County Tyrone
Contae Thír Eoghain
Coontie Tyrone

Coat of arms
Motto: Consilio et Prudentia  (Latin)
"By Wisdom and Prudence"
Country United Kingdom
Region Northern Ireland
Province Ulster
County seat Omagh
Area
 - Total 1,259.9 sq mi (3,263 km2)
Area rank 8th
Population (2001) 166,516
 - Rank 10th [1]
Contae Thír Eoghain is the Irish name; Countie Tyrone,[2] Coontie Tyrone[3] and Coontie Owenslann[4] are Ulster Scots spellings (the latter used only by Dungannon & South Tyrone Borough Council).

County Tyrone (from Irish: Tír Eoghain, meaning "land of Eoghan") is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the south-west shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,155 km², with a population of approximately 166,516, with its county town being Omagh. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, lying within the historical province of Ulster.

Tyrone is the seventh largest of Ireland’s thirty-two counties in area and eighth largest in terms of population.[5] It is the second largest of Ulster’s nine counties in size and fourth largest in terms of population.[6]

Contents

Name

The name Tyrone is derived from Irish: Tír Eoghain meaning "land of Eoghan". This Eoghan was son of king Niall of the Nine Hostages, and brother of Conall Gulban, who gave his name to the kingdom of Tír Chonaill.[7] Historically, it was anglicised as Tirowen or Tyrowen, which are closer to the Irish pronunciation.

History

Historically Tyrone stretched as far north as Lough Foyle, and comprised part of modern day County Londonderry east of the River Foyle. The majority of County Londonderry was carved out of Tyrone between 1610-1620 when that land went to the Guilds of London to set up profit making schemes based on natural resources located there. Tyrone was the traditional stronghold of the various O'Neill clans and families, the strongest of the Gaelic Irish families in Ulster, surviving into the seventeenth century. The ancient principality of Tír Eoghain, the inheritance of the O'Neills, included the whole of the present counties of Tyrone and Londonderry, and the four baronies of West Inishowen, East Inishowen, Raphoe North and Raphoe South in County Donegal.[7]

Geography

With an area of 3,155 square kilometres (1,218 sq mi), Tyrone is the largest county in Northern Ireland. The flat peatlands of East Tyrone borders the shoreline of the largest lake in Ireland, Lough Neagh, rising gradually across to the more mountainous terrain in the west of the county, the area surrounding the Sperrin Mountains, the highest point being Sawel Mountain at a height of 678 m (2,224 ft). The length of the county, from the mouth of the River Blackwater at Lough Neagh to the western point near Carrickaduff hill is 55 miles (89 km). The breadth, from the southern corner, southeast of Fivemiletown, to the northeastern corner near Meenard Mountain is 37.5 miles (60.4 km); giving an area of 1,260 square miles (in 1900).[7] Annaghone lays claim to be the geographical centre of Northern Ireland.

Demography

It is one of four counties in Northern Ireland which presently has a majority of the population from a Catholic community background, according to the 2001 census. In 1900 County Tyrone had a population of 197,719,[7] while in 2001 it was 166,516.

Settlements

Large towns

(population of 18,000 or more and under 75,000 at 2001 Census)[14]

Medium towns

(population of 10,000 or more and under 18,000 at 2001 Census)[14]

Small towns

(population of 4,500 or more and under 10,000 at 2001 Census)[14]

Intermediate settlements

(population of 2,250 or more and under 4,500 at 2001 Census)[14]

Villages

(population of 1,000 or more and under 2,250 at 2001 Census)[14]

Small villages or hamlets

(population of less than 1,000 at 2001 Census)[14]

Subdivisions

Baronies

Parishes

Townlands

Sport

The major sports in Tyrone are Gaelic games, Association football and Rugby Union.[citation needed]

People

Notable residents of County Tyrone have included:

See also

References

  1. ^ Cookstown.gov.uk
  2. ^ North-South Ministerial Council: 2010 Annual Report in Ulster Scots
  3. ^ North-South Ministerial Council: 2006 Annual Report in Ulster Scots
  4. ^ Dungannon and South Tyrone Borough Council
  5. ^ Corry, Eoghan (2005). The GAA Book of Lists. Hodder Headline Ireland. pp. 186–191. ISBN 0340896957. 
  6. ^ Marie Veronica Tarpey The role of Joseph McGarrity in the struggle for Irish independence
  7. ^ a b c d "Description of County Tyrone from Atlas and Cyclopedia of Ireland (1900)". Library Ireland. http://www.libraryireland.com/Atlas/Tyrone.php. Retrieved 24 February 2009. 
  8. ^ For 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865.
  9. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  10. ^ Histpop.org
  11. ^ Nisranews.gov.uk
  12. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". In Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A.. Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press. 
  13. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November). "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850". The Economic History Review 37 (4): 473–488. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120035880/abstract 
  14. ^ a b c d e f "Statistical classification of settlements". NI Neighbourhood Information Service. http://www.ninis.nisra.gov.uk/mapxtreme_towns/statistical%20classification.htm. Retrieved 23 February 2009. 
  15. ^ The Tyrone GAA team have won the Ulster Senior Championship on eight occasions in the 20th century
  16. ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 
  17. ^ Belfast Telegraph - Chloe Coyle
  • The Memoirs of John M. Regan, a Catholic Officer in the RIC and RUC, 1909–48, Joost Augusteijn, editor, District Inspector, Co. Tyrone, 1920s, ISBN 978-1-84682-069-4.

Further reading

  • McNeill, I. 2010. The Flora of County Tyrone. National Museums of Northern Ireland. ISBN 978-905989-17-1

External links


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