Open-mid back rounded vowel


Open-mid back rounded vowel
Open-mid back rounded vowel
ɔ
IPA number 306
Encoding
Entity (decimal) ɔ
Unicode (hex) U+0254
X-SAMPA O
Kirshenbaum O
Sound

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The open-mid back rounded vowel, or low-mid back rounded vowel, is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ɔ. The IPA symbol is a turned letter c and both the symbol and the sound are commonly called "open-o". The name open-o represents the sound, in that it is like the sound represented by [o], the close-mid back rounded vowel, except it is more open. It also represents the symbol, which can be remembered as an o which has been "opened" by removing part of the closed circular shape.

The IPA prefers terms "close" and "open" for vowels, and the name of the article follows this. However, a large number of linguists, perhaps a majority, prefer the terms "high" and "low", and these are the only terms found in introductory textbooks on phonetics such as those by Peter Ladefoged.

Contents

Features

IPA vowel chart
Front Near-​front Central Near-​back Back
Close
Blank vowel trapezoid.svg
iy
ɨʉ
ɯu
ɪʏ
ʊ
eø
ɘɵ
ɤo
ɛœ
ɜɞ
ʌɔ
æ
aɶ
ä
ɑɒ
Near-close
Close-mid
Mid
Open-mid
Near-open
Open
Paired vowels are: unrounded • rounded
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IPA help • IPA key • chart • Loudspeaker.svg chart with audio • view
  • Its vowel height is open-mid, also known as low-mid, which means the tongue is positioned halfway between an open vowel (a low vowel) and a mid vowel.
  • Its vowel backness is back, which means the tongue is positioned as far back as possible in the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant.
  • Its vowel roundedness is protruded, which means that the corners of the lips are drawn together, and the inner surfaces exposed.

Occurrence

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Albanian po [pɔ] 'yes'
Bamana wɔɔrɔ [wɔːrɔ] 'six'
Bengali বস [bɔʃ] 'sit' See Bengali phonology
Catalan[1] soc [ˈsɔk] 'clog' See Catalan phonology
Chinese Cantonese /ngo5 [ŋɔː˩˧] 'I' See Cantonese phonology
Mandarin /wǒ [uɔ˨˩˦] 'I' See Mandarin phonology
Min [ɡɔ˨] 'five'
Wu [bɔ˨˩˦] 'run'
Dutch Standard bot [bɔt] 'bone' See Dutch phonology
Amelands hôl [hɔːl] 'hollow'
English Australian hot [hɔt] 'hot' See Australian English phonology
GA dog [dɔɡ] 'dog' Can be closer or equal to [ɑ] in some dialects. See English phonology.
RP bore [bɔː] 'bore'
Faroese góðan morgun [ˌɡɔuwan ˈmɔɹɡʊn] 'good morning'
French[2] sort [sɔʁ] 'fate' or 'leaves' See French phonology
Georgian[3] სწრი [st͡sʼɔɾi] 'correct'
German voll [fɔl] 'full' See German phonology
Italian[4] parola [paˈɾɔːla] 'word' See Italian phonology
Lao [bɔː] 'origin'
Norwegian topp [tɔp] 'top' See Norwegian phonology
Occitan òme [ˈɔme] 'man'
Polish[5] kot About this sound [kɔt] 'cat' See Polish phonology
Portuguese[6] só [sɔ] 'alone' See Portuguese phonology
Swedish åtta About this sound [ˈɔtːa] 'eight' See Swedish phonology
Tajik тоҷикӣ [tɔːdʒɪˈkiː] 'Tajik language'
Ukrainian вовк [wɔwk] 'wolf' See Ukrainian phonology
Uzbek O'zbek [ɔzˈbek] 'Uzbek'
Vietnamese to [tɔ] 'large' See Vietnamese phonology
West Frisian bôle [bɔːɫə] 'bread'

See also

References

Bibliography

  • Carbonell, Joan F.; Llisterri, Joaquim (1992), "Catalan", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 22 (1-2): 53–56 
  • Cruz-Ferreira, Madalena (1995), "European Portuguese", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 25 (2): 90–94 
  • Fougeron, Cecile; Smith, Caroline L (1993), "Illustrations of the IPA:French", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 23 (2): 73–76 
  • Jassem, Wiktor (2003), "Polish", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 33 (1): 103–107 
  • Rogers, Derek; d'Arcangeli, Luciana (2004), "Italian", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 34 (1): 117–121 
  • Shosted, Ryan K.; Vakhtang, Chikovani (2006), "Standard Georgian", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 36 (2): 255–264 

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