Michigan Wolverines football


Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines football
Current season
MichiganWolverinesBlockM.png Michigan Wolverines football helmet.gif
First season 1879
Athletic director David Brandon
Head coach Brady Hoke
1st year, 9–2  (.818)
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Year built 1927
Stadium capacity 109,901
Stadium surface FieldTurf
Location Ann Arbor, Michigan
League NCAA Division I FBS
Conference Big Ten
Division Legends
All-time record 893–310–36 (.735)
Postseason bowl record 19–21
Claimed national titles 11
Conference titles 42
Heisman winners 3
Consensus All-Americans 77[1]
Current uniform
BigTen-Uniform-Michigan.png
Colors Maize and Blue            
Fight song "The Victors"
Marching band Michigan Marching Band
Outfitter Adidas
Rivals Ohio State Buckeyes
Michigan State Spartans
Notre Dame Fighting Irish
Minnesota Golden Gophers
Website MGoBlue.com

The Michigan Wolverines football program represents the University of Michigan in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Michigan has the most all-time wins and the highest winning percentage in college football history.[2] The team is known for its distinctive winged helmet, its fight song, its record-breaking attendance figures at Michigan Stadium,[3] and its many rivalries, particularly its annual season-ending game against Ohio State, once voted as ESPN's best sports rivalry.[4]

Michigan began competing in intercollegiate football in 1879. The Wolverines joined the Big Ten Conference at its inception in 1896, when the conference was commonly known as the Western Conference, and have been members since with the exception of a hiatus from 1907 to 1916. Michigan has won or shared 42 league titles, more than any other football program in any conference. Since the inception of the AP Poll in 1936, Michigan has finished in the top 10 a record 37 times. The Wolverines claim 11 national championships, most recently that of the 1997 squad voted atop the final AP Poll.

From 1900 to 1989, Michigan was led by a series of nine head coaches, each of whom have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame either as a player or as a coach. Fielding H. Yost became Michigan's head coach in 1901 and guided his "Point-a-Minute" squads to a streak of 56 games without a defeat spanning from his arrival until the season finale in 1905, including a victory in the 1902 Rose Bowl, the first college football bowl game ever played. Fritz Crisler brought his winged helmet from Princeton University in 1938 and led the 1947 Wolverines to a national title and Michigan's second Rose Bowl win. Bo Schembechler coached the team for 21 seasons (1969–1989) in which he won 13 Big Ten titles and a program-record 194 games. The first decade of his tenure was underscored by a fierce competition with his former mentor, Woody Hayes, whose Ohio State Buckeyes squared off against Schembechler's Wolverines in a stretch of the Michigan – Ohio State rivalry dubbed the "Ten-Year War".

After Schembechler's retirement, his longtime assistants, Gary Moeller and Lloyd Carr, helmed the team for the next 18 years. Michigan continued its success under Moeller and Carr with a winning percentage of .755, eight more Big Ten Conference championships, and a share of the 1997 national title, but the era was punctuated by a number of high-profile defeats for the Wolverines, including a loss to Colorado on Kordell Stewart's iconic Hail Mary pass to Michael Westbrook in 1994, a controversial last-second loss to Michigan State in 2001, and an infamous defeat at the hands of the Football Championship Subdivision Appalachian State Mountaineers in the 2007 season opener. Rich Rodriguez succeeded Carr in 2008 and was fired after three seasons in which he compiled the worst record of any coach in program history. On January 11, 2011, Brady Hoke was hired as Michigan's 19th head football coach.[5]

The Michigan Wolverines have featured 77 players that have garnered consensus selection to the College Football All-America Team. Three Wolverines have won the Heisman Trophy: Tom Harmon in 1940, Desmond Howard in 1991, and Charles Woodson in 1997. Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States, started at center and was voted most valuable player by his teammates on the 1934 team.

Contents

History

Program records and achievements

Winning superlatives

  • Most all-time wins in college football history (892)
  • Highest all-time winning percentage in college football history (.735)
  • The most winning seasons (113)
  • The most undefeated seasons of teams currently competing in Division I-A/FBS (23)
  • One of only three schools with a winning record against every Division I-A/FBS conference

Attendance and television

  • The largest crowd to ever attend an NCAA football game: 114,804 on September 10, 2011 at Michigan Stadium vs. Notre Dame
  • The longest streak in home game attendance of over 100,000 (238 games; since November 8, 1975 vs. Purdue)
  • The most televised school in college football history: 430 televised games

Current streaks

  • The longest current streak of games in Division I-A/FBS since last being shut out: 347 games; Michigan was last shut out on October 20, 1984, at Iowa; this is the second longest scoring streak in Division I-A/FBS history trailing BYU's 361-game streak from 1975 to 2003[6]

National championships

The following is a list of Michigan's 11 claimed national championships:

Year Coach Selector Record Bowl
1901 Fielding H. Yost Helms, Holgate, NCF 11–0 Won Rose
1902 Fielding H. Yost Helms, Billingsley, Houlgate, Parke H. Davis, NCF 11–0
1903 Fielding H. Yost Billingsley, NCF 11–0–1
1904 Fielding H. Yost Billingsley, NCF 10–0
1918 Fielding H. Yost Billingsley, NCF 5–0
1923 Fielding H. Yost Billingsley, NCF 8–0
1932 Harry G. Kipke Dickinson, Parke H. Davis 8–0
1933 Harry G. Kipke Billingsley, Boand, Dickinson, Helms, Houlgate, CFRA, NCF, Parke H. Davis, Poling 7–0–1
1947 Fritz Crisler Berryman, Billingsley, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, CFRA, Helms, Houlgate, Litkenhous, NCF, Poling, Sagarin 11–0 Won Rose
1948 Bennie Oosterbaan AP 9–0
1997 Lloyd Carr AP 12–0 Won Rose
National Championships 11

Other undefeated seasons

Michigan was also undefeated in 12 other seasons: 1879, 1880, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1898, 1910, 1922, 1930, 1973, 1992

Bowl games

Michigan has played in 40 bowl games in its history, compiling a record of 19–21. Before missing a bowl game in 2008, Michigan had made a bowl game 33 years in a row and had had a winning season for 40 straight years. From 1918 to 1945, the Big Ten Conference did not allow its teams to participate in bowls. From 1946 to 1974, only a conference champion, or a surrogate representative, was allowed to attend a bowl, the Rose Bowl, and no team could go two years in a row, with one exception.

Date Bowl W/L Opponent PF PA
January 1, 1902 Rose Bowl W Stanford 49 0
January 1, 1948 Rose Bowl W USC 49 0
January 1, 1951 Rose Bowl W Cal 14 6
January 1, 1965 Rose Bowl W Oregon State 34 7
January 1, 1970 Rose Bowl L USC 3 10
January 1, 1972 Rose Bowl L Stanford 12 13
January 1, 1976 Orange Bowl L Oklahoma 6 14
January 1, 1977 Rose Bowl L USC 6 14
January 2, 1978 Rose Bowl L Washington 20 27
January 1, 1979 Rose Bowl L USC 10 17
December 28, 1979 Gator Bowl L North Carolina 15 17
January 1, 1981 Rose Bowl W Washington 23 6
December 31, 1981 Bluebonnet Bowl W UCLA 33 14
January 1, 1983 Rose Bowl L UCLA 14 24
January 2, 1984 Sugar Bowl L Auburn 7 9
December 21, 1984 Holiday Bowl L BYU 17 24
January 1, 1986 Fiesta Bowl W Nebraska 27 23
January 1, 1987 Rose Bowl L Arizona State 15 22
January 2, 1988 Hall of Fame Bowl W Alabama 28 24
January 2, 1989 Rose Bowl W USC 22 14
January 1, 1990 Rose Bowl L USC 10 17
January 1, 1991 Gator Bowl W Mississippi 35 3
January 1, 1992 Rose Bowl L Washington 14 34
January 1, 1993 Rose Bowl W Washington 38 31
January 1, 1994 Hall of Fame Bowl W North Carolina State 42 7
December 30, 1994 Holiday Bowl W Colorado State 24 14
December 28, 1995 Alamo Bowl L Texas A&M 20 22
January 1, 1997 Outback Bowl L Alabama 14 17
January 1, 1998 Rose Bowl W Washington State 21 16
January 1, 1999 Citrus Bowl W Arkansas 45 31
January 1, 2000 Orange Bowl W Alabama 35 34
January 1, 2001 Citrus Bowl W Auburn 31 28
January 1, 2002 Citrus Bowl L Tennessee 17 45
January 1, 2003 Outback Bowl W Florida 38 30
January 1, 2004 Rose Bowl L USC 14 28
January 1, 2005 Rose Bowl L Texas 37 38
December 28, 2005 Alamo Bowl L Nebraska 28 32
January 1, 2007 Rose Bowl L USC 18 32
January 1, 2008 Capital One Bowl W Florida 41 35
January 1, 2011 Gator Bowl L Mississippi State 14 52
Total 40 bowl games 19–21 940 831

Rivalries

Michigan – Notre Dame rivalry

Michigan – Ohio State rivalry

Rivalry trophy games

Michigan plays two rivalry trophy games. Michigan plays Minnesota for the Little Brown Jug, with their record in games played for the Jug, which dates to 1909, being 67–22–3. The Wolverines currently hold the trophy having won the 2011 contest. Michigan also competes against Michigan State for the Paul Bunyan Trophy, which was introduced in 1953 by the then governor of Michigan, G. Mennen Williams. Michigan State currently holds the trophy for four years running. The overall series record for the Michigan – Michigan State rivalry is 67–32–5 in Michigan's favor.

Head coaching history

Head Coach Years Seasons Record Pct. Conf. Record Pct. Conf. Titles Bowl Games National Titles
No coach 1879–1881, 1883–1890 11 23–10–1 .691 0
Mike Murphy and Frank Crawford 1891 1 4–5 .444 0
Frank Barbour 1892–1893 2 14–8 .636 0
William McCauley 1894–1895 2 17–2–1 .875 0
William Ward 1896 1 9–1 .900 2–1 .667 0 0
Gustave Ferbert 1897–1899 3 24–3–1 .875 6–2 .750 1 0
Langdon Lea 1900 1 7–2–1 .750 3–2 .600 0 0
Fielding H. Yost 1901–1923, 1925–1926 25 165–29–10 .833 42–10–2 .778 10 1 6
George Little 1924 1 6–2 .750 4–2 .667 0 0 0
Elton Wieman 1927–1928 2 9–6–1 .593 5–5 .500 0 0 0
Harry G. Kipke 1929–1937 9 46–26–4 .631 27–21–2 .560 4 0 2
Fritz Crisler 1938–1947 10 71–16–3 .805 42–11–3 .777 2 1 1
Bennie Oosterbaan 1948–1958 11 63–33–4 .650 44–23–4 .648 3 1 1
Bump Elliott 1959–1968 10 51–42–2 .547 32–34–2 .485 1 1 0
Bo Schembechler 1969–1989 21 194–48–5 .796 143–24–3 .850 13 17 0
Gary Moeller 1990–1994 5 44–13–3 .758 30–8–2 .775 3 5 0
Lloyd Carr 1995–2007 13 122–40 .753 81–23 .779 5 13 1
Rich Rodriguez 2008–2010 3 15–22 .405 6–18 .250 0 1 0
Brady Hoke 2011–present 1 9–2 .818 5–2 .714 0 0 0
Totals 1879–present 132 893–310–36 .735 472–186–18 .712 42 40 11

Note: Michigan did not play any outside games in 1882.

Individual awards and honors

National award winners

Players

1940: Tom Harmon
1991: Desmond Howard
1997: Charles Woodson
1940: Tom Harmon
1991: Desmond Howard
1991: Desmond Howard
1997: Charles Woodson
1991: Erick Anderson
1992: Elvis Grbac
1997: Charles Woodson
1997: Charles Woodson
1997: Charles Woodson
2003: Chris Perry
2004: Braylon Edwards
2004: David Baas
2006: LaMarr Woodley
2006: LaMarr Woodley

Coaches

  • Paul "Bear" Bryant Award
1969: Bo Schembechler
1997: Lloyd Carr
1977: Bo Schembechler
2007: Lloyd Carr
1997: Jim Herrmann

Heisman Trophy voting

Twenty-six Heisman Trophy candidates have played at Michigan, Three have won the award:

All-Americans

Team and conference MVPs

Michigan Most Valuable Player Award (1926–1994), officially renamed the Bo Schembechler Award (1995–present); winners of the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's MVP also noted:[7]

Big Ten Conference honors

1982: Anthony Carter
1986: Jim Harbaugh
1990: Jon Vaughn (coaches)
1991: Desmond Howard (coaches and media)
1992: Tyrone Wheatley (coaches and media)
2003: Chris Perry (coaches and media)
2004: Braylon Edwards (coaches and media)
2010: Denard Robinson (coaches and media)
  • Offensive Lineman of the Year
1991: Greg Skrepenak
1998: Jon Jansen
2000: Steve Hutchinson
2004: David Baas
2006: Jake Long
2007: Jake Long
1997: Charles Woodson (coaches and media)
2001: Larry Foote (coaches and media)
2006: LaMarr Woodley (coaches and media)
1985: Mike Hammerstein
1988: Mark Messner
1992: Chris Hutchinson
2006: LaMarr Woodley
1995: Charles Woodson (coaches)
1997: Anthony Thomas (coaches and media)
2003: Steve Breaston (coaches)
2004: Mike Hart (coaches and media)
1972: Bo Schembechler (media)
1976: Bo Schembechler (media)
1980: Bo Schembechler (media)
1982: Bo Schembechler (coaches)
1985: Bo Schembechler (media and coaches)
1989: Bo Schembechler (coaches)
1991: Gary Moeller
1992: Gary Moeller

Retired numbers

Michigan Football Legend

To honor a Michigan Football Legend, a patch is placed on the upper left chest of the jersey which was worn by the Michigan Football Legend during his time as a Wolverine. Desmond Howard became the first Michigan Football Legend when a patch bearing his name on the 21 jersey was introduced prior to the Michigan-Notre Dame game on September 10, 2011.[8]

Hall of Fame

College

Michigan alumni inductees to the College Football Hall of Fame include:[9][10]

Professional

Michigan alumni inductees to the Pro Football Hall of Fame include:[11]

Individual school records

Rushing records

  • Most rushing attempts, career: 1,015, Mike Hart (2004–2007)
  • Most rushing attempts, season: 338, Chris Perry (2003)
  • Most rushing attempts, game: 51, Chris Perry (November 1, 2003 at Michigan State)
  • Most rushing yards, career: 5,040, Mike Hart (2004–2007)
  • Most rushing yards, season: 1,818, Tim Biakabutuka (1995)
  • Most rushing yards, game: 347, Ron Johnson (November 16, 1968 vs. Wisconsin)
  • Most rushing touchdowns, career: 55, Anthony Thomas (1997–2000)
  • Most rushing touchdowns, season: 19, Ron Johnson (1968)
  • Most rushing touchdowns, game: 5, Ron Johnson (November 16, 1968 vs. Wisconsin)
  • Longest run from scrimmage: 92 yards, Butch Woolfolk (November 3, 1979 vs. Wisconsin)
  • Most games with at least 100 rushing yards, career: 28, Mike Hart (2004–2007)
  • Most games with at least 100 rushing yards, season: 10, Jamie Morris (1987)
  • Most games with at least 200 rushing yards, career: 5, Mike Hart (2004–2007)
  • Most games with at least 200 rushing yards, season: 3, Mike Hart (2004)

[12]

Passing records

  • Most passing attempts, career: 1,387, Chad Henne (2004–2007)
  • Most passing attempts, season: 456, John Navarre (2003)
  • Most passing attempts, game: 56, Tom Brady (November 21, 1998 at Ohio State)
  • Most passing completions, career: 828, Chad Henne (2004–2007)
  • Most passing completions, season: 270, John Navarre (2003)
  • Most passing completions, game: 34, Tom Brady (January 1, 2000 vs. Alabama in Orange Bowl)
  • Most passing yards, career: 9,715, Chad Henne (2004–2007)
  • Most passing yards, season: 3,331, John Navarre (2003)
  • Most passing yards, game: 389, John Navarre (October 4, 2003 at Iowa)
  • Most passing touchdowns, career: 86, Chad Henne (2004–2007)
  • Most passing touchdowns, season: 25, Elvis Grbac (1991) and Chad Henne (2004)
  • Most passing touchdowns, game: 4, 18 times, most recently by Denard Robinson (September 10, 2011 vs. Notre Dame)
  • Longest pass completion: 97 yards, Ryan Mallett to Mario Manningham (November 10, 2007 at Wisconsin)
  • Most games with at least 200 passing yards, career: 28, John Navarre (2000–2003)
  • Most games with at least 200 passing yards, season: 10, John Navarre (2003)
  • Most games with at least 300 passing yards, career: 5, Chad Henne (2004–2007)
  • Most games with at least 300 passing yards, season: 3, John Navarre (2003) and Chad Henne (2004)

[13]

Receiving records

  • Most receptions, career: 252, Braylon Edwards (2001–2004)
  • Most receptions, season: 97, Braylon Edwards (2004)
  • Most receptions, game: 15, twice by Marquise Walker (September 8, 2001 at Washington and November 24, 2001 vs. Ohio State)
  • Most receiving yards, career: 3,541, Braylon Edwards (2001–2004)
  • Most receiving yards, season: 1,330, Braylon Edwards (2004)
  • Most receiving yards, game: 246, Roy Roundtree (November 6, 2010 vs. Illinois)
  • Most touchdown receptions, career: 39, Braylon Edwards (2001–2004) (also a Big Ten Conference record)[14]
  • Most touchdown receptions, season: 19, Desmond Howard (1991) (also a Big Ten Conference record)[15]
  • Most touchdown receptions, game: 4, Derrick Alexander (October 24, 1992 vs. Minnesota)
  • Longest pass reception: 97 yards, Mario Manningham from Ryan Mallett (November 10, 2007 at Wisconsin)
  • Most games with at least 100 receiving yards, career: 17, Braylon Edwards (2001–2004)
  • Most games with at least 100 receiving yards, season: 7, Braylon Edwards (2004) and Mario Manningham (2007)

[16]

Kickoff return records

  • Most kickoff returns, career: 81, Steve Breaston (2003–2006)
  • Most kickoff returns, season: 39, Darryl Stonum (2009)
  • Most kickoff returns, game: 8, Todd Howard (January 1, 2002 vs. Tennessee in Florida Citrus Bowl)
  • Most kickoff return yards, career: 1,993, Steve Breaston (2003–2006)
  • Most kickoff return yards, season: 1,001, Darryl Stonum (2009)
  • Most kickoff return yards, game: 221, Steve Breaston (January 1, 2005 vs. Texas in Rose Bowl)
  • Most kickoff return touchdowns, career: 2, Desmond Howard (1989–1991)
  • Longest kickoff return: 100 yards, Seth Smith (October 29, 1994 vs. Wisconsin)

[17]

Punt return records

  • Most punt returns, career: 127, Steve Breaston (2003–2006) (also a Big Ten Conference record)[18]
  • Most punt returns, season: 45, Steve Breaston (2003)
  • Most punt returns, game: 9, Steve Breaston (September 23, 2006 vs. Wisconsin)
  • Most punt return yards, career: 1,599, Steve Breaston (2003–2006) (also a Big Ten Conference record)[18]
  • Most punt return yards, season: 619, Steve Breaston (2003)
  • Most punt return yards, game: 140, George Hoey (October 28, 1967 at Minnesota)
  • Most punt return touchdowns, career: 4, Gene Derricotte (1944–1948), Derrick Alexander (1989–1993), and Steve Breaston (2003–2006)
  • Longest punt return: 93 yards, Desmond Howard (November 23, 1991 vs. Ohio State)

[19]

Current squad

Alumni currently in the NFL

Updated as of October 18, 2011

[21]

Related books

  • Jim Cnockaert (2003). Stadium Stories: Michigan Wolverines: Colorful Tales of the Maize and Blue. Globe Pequot. ISBN 0-7627-2784-5. 
  • Kevin Allen, Art Regner, Nate Brown, and Bo Schembechler (2005). What it Means to Be a Wolverine: Michigan's Greatest Players, Talk about Michigan Football. Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-661-1. 

References

  1. ^ "NCAA Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2010. pp. 12–17. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  2. ^ "NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. pp. 62–63. http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/DI/2010/2010FBS.pdf. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  3. ^ http://www.sportingintelligence.com/2011/02/09/fields-of-amateur-dreams-the-22-us-college-football-teams-with-crowds-bigger-than-the-nfl-average-090201
  4. ^ "The 10 greatest rivalries". ESPN Internet Ventures. January 3, 2007. http://espn.go.com/endofcentury/s/other/bestrivalries.html. Retrieved April 11, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Hoke Named Michigan Football Coach". The University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. January 11, 2011. http://www.mgoblue.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/011111aab.html. Retrieved January 11, 2011. 
  6. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records: Football Bowl Subdivision Records. NCAA. p. 112. http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2011/FBS.pdf. Retrieved October 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Michigan Football Bo Schembechler Award". University of Michigan & Host Interactive. June 23, 2008. http://www.mgoblue.com/football/article.aspx?id=40206. Retrieved October 4, 2008. 
  8. ^ "Howard Earns Inaugural Designation of Michigan Football Legend". University of Michigan & Host Interactive. September 10, 2011. http://www.mgoblue.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/091011aad.html. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 
  9. ^ "HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE SEARCH". College Football Hall of Fame. http://collegefootball.org/famersearch.php. Retrieved September 9, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Michigan Members of the College Football Hall of Fame". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. May 12, 2008. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/misc/cfhofame.htm. Retrieved September 9, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Hall of Famers by College". Pro Football Hall of Fame. http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/colleges.aspx. Retrieved October 27, 2009. 
  12. ^ "2011 Michigan Football Guide". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. pp. 94–95. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/fbl-guide-2011-records-1.pdf. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  13. ^ "2011 Michigan Football Guide". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. pp. 101–103. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/fbl-guide-2011-records-1.pdf. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  14. ^ "2011 Big Ten Football Media Guide". The Big Ten Conference Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. p. 54. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/2011-football-MG.pdf. Retrieved October 24, 2011. 
  15. ^ "2011 Big Ten Football Media Guide". The Big Ten Conference Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. p. 55. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/2011-football-MG.pdf. Retrieved October 24, 2011. 
  16. ^ "2011 Michigan Football Guide". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. pp. 104–107. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/fbl-guide-2011-records-1.pdf. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  17. ^ "2011 Michigan Football Guide". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. p. 114. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/fbl-guide-2011-records-1.pdf. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  18. ^ a b "2011 Big Ten Football Media Guide". The Big Ten Conference Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. p. 58. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/2011-football-MG.pdf. Retrieved October 24, 2011. 
  19. ^ "2011 Michigan Football Guide". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. p. 115. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/fbl-guide-2011-records-1.pdf. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  20. ^ Vensel, Matt (October 19, 2011). "The career of Prescott Burgess in transaction blurbs". The Baltimore Sun. http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2011-10-19/sports/bal-sportsblitz-prescott-burgess-baltimore-ravens1019_1_prescott-burgess-nfl-draft-nfl-story. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  21. ^ "FORMER WOLVERINE PLAYERS IN THE NFL (Alphabetical) (As of Oct. 16, 2011)". MGOBLUE.COM - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. October 16, 2011. http://www.mgoblue.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/in-the-nfl.html. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 

External links


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