Battle of Adamclisi


Battle of Adamclisi

Infobox Military Conflict


caption=
conflict=Battle of Adamclisi
partof=the Dacian Wars
date= Winter of 101 to 102
place=Adamclisi, Dobruja, Romania
result=Decisive Roman victory
combatant1=Dacia and its allies
combatant2=Roman Empire
commander1= unknown
commander2=Trajan
strength1= around 15,000 sarmatians and dacians
strength2=unknown
casualties1= the vast majority of the army
casualties2= 4000 men killed

Domitian campaign

Battle of Adamclisi was a major battle , in 92 AD when a coalition of Dacian and Rhoxolani sarmatian completely slaughtered the Legio XXI Rapax [Julian Bennett -Traian ISBN 973-571-583-X]

Dacian Wars

The Battle of Adamclisi was also a major battle in the first Dacian war, in the winter of 101 to 102.

Background

After the victory of Second Battle of Tapae, Emperor Trajan decided to wait until spring to continue his offensive on Sarmizegetusa, the capital of Dacia. Decebalus, the Dacian king benefited from this, and made out a plan along with the neighboring allied tribes of the Roxolans and Bastarnae, to attack south of the Danube, in the Roman province of Moesia, in an attempt to force the Romans to leave their positions in the mountains near Sarmizegetusa.

The battle

The Dacian army, together with the Roxolani and the Bastarnae, crossed the frozen Danube, but because the weather wasn’t cold enough, the ice broke under their weight, causing many to die in the frozen water.

Trajan moved his army from the mountains, following the Dacians into Moesia. A first battle was fought at night somewhere near the town of Nicopole, a battle with little casualties on both sides and with no crucial result. However as the Romans received reinforcements, they were able to corner the Daco-Sarmatian army.

The decisive battle was fought at Adamclisi, a difficult battle for both the Dacians and the Romans. Even if the outcome of the battle was a decisive Roman victory, both sides suffered very heavy casualties.

Aftermath

After the battle, Trajan advanced to Sarmizegetusa, Decebalus requesting a truce. Trajan agreed to the peace offerings. This time the peace was favorable to the Roman Empire: Decebalus must yield the territories occupied by the Roman army, and he must give back the Romans all the weapons and war machines received after 89, when the Romans under Domitian were forced to pay an annual gift to the Dacians.

Decebalus was obliged to reconsider his foreign policies, and "“to have friends and enemies the friends and enemies of the Roman Empire”", as described by Dio Cassius.

After the conquest of Dacia following the 105-106 war, Trajan built in memory of the battle, the Tropaeum Traiani at Adamclisi in 109.

Notes

External links

* [http://www.dacica.ro/ Bibioteca Dacica]
* [http://www.enciclopedia-dacica.ro/ Enciclopedia Dacica]
* [http://www.cjc.ro/engleza/adamen~1.htm]


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