Dale Meyerrose


Dale Meyerrose
Dale W. Meyerrose
Dale Meyerrose.jpg
Born Indianapolis, Indiana
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service 1975-2005
Rank Major General
Awards Legion of Merit
Other work Chief Information Officer for the Director of National Intelligence

Major General (Retired) Dale W. Meyerrose is the Harris Corporation lead for the National Cyber Initiative, as of January 2009. Before January he was the Associate Director of National Intelligence/Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Information Sharing Executive for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI).

Previously he was the Director of Command Control Systems, Headquarters North American Aerospace Defense Command, and Director of Architectures and Integration, Headquarters U.S. Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. He also served as the Chief Information Officer for both commands. General Meyerrose ensured the Commander of NORAD had the command and control systems to safeguard the air sovereignty of North America.

For U.S. Northern Command, he created architectures and integrated solutions to support the command's mission to deter, prevent and defeat threats to the United States. He facilitated communications and information sharing for military assistance to civil authorities for incident response responsibilities assigned to Northern Command. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, General Meyerrose entered the Air Force in 1975 after graduating from the United States Air Force Academy. His career highlights include service as a director in three Air Force major air commands and three unified combatant commands, a Joint Task Force Director of Communications, and a commander of two major Air Force communications units. The general wears the master communications badge and is a master parachutist.

Meyerrose is an agent of change in the world of government intelligence. With some 16 different agencies involved in the gathering of intelligence, the challenge of seeing the collective whole was dramatized by the intelligence breakdown of September 11, 2001. The breakdown, a product of agency competitiveness and legacy information systems, was greatly due to organizational silos reinforced by the shackles of hierarchy. As Meyerrose noted of the intelligence community: "We've had this 'need to know' culture for years. Well, we need to move to a 'need to share' philosophy."

Meyerrose initiated an effort to test and ultimately use blogs as a tool for intelligence gathering. While the blogosphere is well known amongst Internet users, it was new terrain for the secure information culture of the intelligence community. Recognizing the trappings of large scale initiatives, Meyerrose pursued thinking big, starting small, and scaling fast through the use of a blog. A simple pilot project focused on avian flu proved a tremendous success. Participants numbered more than 38,000 in just a few months. Contributions were made worldwide, and content and quality grew rapidly. In a few short months the blog became recognized as a valuable resource on the topic of avian flu.

Contents

Education

Assignments

  • July 1975 - February 1976, distinguished graduate, Communications-Electronics Officer Course, Keesler AFB, Mississippi
  • February 1976 - April 1977, maintenance officer, 4th Combat Communications Group, Altus AFB, Oklahoma
  • May 1977 - June 1979, aide-de-camp, later, assistant executive officer to the Commander, European Communications Division, Kapaun Air Station, West Germany
  • June 1979 - June 1980, aide-de-camp to the Commander, Air Force Communications Command, Scott AFB, Illinois
  • June 1980 - February 1982, Chief of Maintenance, 1974th Communications Group, Scott AFB, Illinois
  • March 1982 - March 1983, member and Air Staff Training Program officer, Secretary of the Air Force Personnel Council, Washington, D.C.
  • March 1983 - May 1985, Chief, Long-Haul Information Systems, later, point of contact, Command, Control and Communications Systems Panel, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • June 1985 - July 1987, Commander, 2048th Communications Squadron, Carswell AFB, Texas
  • July 1987 - June 1990, Communications Support Officer, National Military Command Center, the Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.
  • June 1990 - July 1991, Chief, Future Concepts, Deputy Chief of Staff for Command, Control, Communications and Computers, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • August 1991 - June 1992, student, National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.
  • July 1992 - June 1994, Commander, 3rd Combat Communications Group, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma (February 1993 - May 1993, Director of Communications, Operation Southern Watch, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)
  • July 1994 - December 1996, Director of Communications and Information and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Ramstein AB, Germany
  • December 1996 - June 2000, Director of Communications and Information and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters Air Combat Command, Langley AFB, Virginia
  • June 2000 - October 2002, Director of Command Control Systems and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Space Command, and Director of Communications and Information and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters Air Force Space Command, Peterson AFB, Colorado
  • October 2002 - 2005, Director of Command Control Systems and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters North American Aerospace Defense Command, and Director of Architectures and Integration and Chief Information Officer, Headquarters U.S. Northern Command, Peterson AFB, Colorado

Major awards and decorations

Other achievements

  • 1987 Outstanding Young AFCEAN Award, Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association
  • 1992 Medal of Merit, AFCEA
  • 1999 International AFCEAN of the Year, AFCEA
  • 2005 "Top 100" Information Technology Professionals, Federal Computer Weekly

Effective dates of promotion

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "[1]".


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