Ningishzida


Ningishzida
The "libation vase of Gudea", dedicated to Ningishzida (21st century BC short chronology). The caduceus is interpreted as depicting the god himself.

Ningishzida (sum: dnin-ǧiš-zid-da) is a Mesopotamian deity of the underworld. His name in Sumerian is translated as "lord of the good tree"[1] by Thorkild Jacobsen.

In Sumerian mythology, he appears in Adapa's myth as one of the two guardians of Anu's celestial palace, alongside Dumuzi. He was sometimes depicted as a serpent with a human head.

Lagash had a temple dedicated to Ningishzida, and Gudea, patesi of Lagash in the 21st century BC short chronology), was one of his devotees. In the Louvre, there is a famous green steatite vase carved for king Gudea of Lagash , dedicated by its inscription: "To the god Ningiszida, his god Gudea, Ensi[citation needed] (governor) of Lagash, for the prolongation of his life, has dedicated this".

Ningishzida is sometimes the son of Ninazu and Ningiridda, even though the myth Ningishzidda's journey to the netherworld suggests he is the son of Ereshkigal.[2] Following an inscription found at Lagash, he was the son of Anu, the heavens.[3]

His wife is Azimua[4] and his sister is Amashilama. He was one of the ancestors of Gilgamesh.

Ningishzida is the earliest known symbol of snakes twining (some say in copulation[who?]) around an axial rod. It predates the Caduceus of Hermes, the Rod of Asclepius and the staff of Moses by more than a millennium.[5] Although Wadjet 'the Green One', the serpent Goddess of Lower Egypt from the Pre-dynastic period demonstrates the earliest known representation of a single serpent entwined around a pole – in this case a papyrus reed (refer to first glyph): Wadjet Heiroglyph[unreliable source?]

The Adapa myth mentions Ningizzida and Tammuz (or Dumuzi) and refers to the serpent god as male.

Contents

See also

References

  1. ^ Sumerian.org Q&A#20 (Ningishzida)
  2. ^ Ningishzidda's journey to the netherworld on ETCSL
  3. ^ Ira Maurice Price, Notes on the Pantheon of the Gudean Cylinders, The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Oct., 1900), pp. 47-53 http://www.jstor.org/stable/528092
  4. ^ Sumerian Mythology: Chapter II. Myths of Origins
  5. ^ Turner, Frederick. Natural Religion. Transaction Publishers. ISBN 0765803321. 

Further reading

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ningishzida — prop. n. (Babylonian mythology) A Babylonian underworld deity, the patron of medicine. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ningishzida — est une divinité mésopotamienne liée au monde souterrain. En sumérien, son nom signifie « Seigneur du bon arbre (ou bois) ». C est donc peut être à l origine un dieu de la végétation. Dans la mythologie sumérienne, il apparaît dans le… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Ningishzida — ▪ Sumerian deity       in Mesopotamian religion, Sumerian deity, city god of Gishbanda, near Ur in the southern orchard region. Although Ningishzida was a power of the netherworld, where he held the office of throne bearer, he seems to have… …   Universalium

  • Ningishzida —    A minor Sumerian god who, as the grandson of Ereshkigal, ruler of the Underworld, dwelled with her in that nether realm. Ningishzida s father was Ninazu, and his wife was Geshtinanna, who was compelled to spend half of each year with Ning… …   Ancient Mesopotamia dictioary

  • Ningishzida — noun an underworld Babylonian deity; patron of medicine • Regions: ↑Babylon • Instance Hypernyms: ↑Semitic deity …   Useful english dictionary

  • Statues of Gudea — Twenty seven statues of Gudea have been found so far (A AA). A K were found during Ernest de Sarzec s excavations in the court of the palace of Adad nadin ahhe in Telloh/Girsu. M Q come from clandestine excavations in Telloh in 1924; most of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Horned Serpent — For the tribe of werewolves in the World of Darkness setting, see Uktena (World of Darkness). A Horned Serpent in a Barrier Canyon Style pictograph, Western San Rafael Swell region of Utah. The Horned Serpent appears in the mythologies of many… …   Wikipedia

  • Lagas — Sitzende Statue des Gudea, Prinz von Lagaš, der Gottheit Ningishzida gewidmet (ca. 2.120 v. Chr.; ausgegraben in Telloh [ehem. Girsu], Irak) Lagaš (auch Lagasch, Lagas) war eine sumerische Stadt in Süd Mesopotamien. Der heutige Name ist Tell el… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lagasch — Sitzende Statue des Gudea, Prinz von Lagaš, der Gottheit Ningishzida gewidmet (ca. 2.120 v. Chr.; ausgegraben in Telloh [ehem. Girsu], Irak) Lagaš (auch Lagasch, Lagas) war eine sumerische Stadt in Süd Mesopotamien. Der heutige Name ist Tell el… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lagash — Sitzende Statue des Gudea, Prinz von Lagaš, der Gottheit Ningishzida gewidmet (ca. 2.120 v. Chr.; ausgegraben in Telloh [ehem. Girsu], Irak) Lagaš (auch Lagasch, Lagas) war eine sumerische Stadt in Süd Mesopotamien. Der heutige Name ist Tell el… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.