Prime Minister of Armenia


Prime Minister of Armenia

The Prime Minister of Armenia is the most senior minister within the Armenian government, and is required by the constitution to "oversee the Government's regular activities and coordinate the work of the Ministers." The Prime Minister is appointed by the President of Armenia, but can be removed by a vote of no confidence in parliament. The office of president is generally considered to be more powerful than the office of Prime Minister.

The office of Prime Minister was first established in 1918 with the foundation of the Democratic Republic of Armenia. It vanished when Democratic Republic of Armenia was incorporated into the Soviet Union. When Armenia regained its independence, the office of Prime Minister was reintroduced.

List of Heads of Government of Armenia (1918-Present)

Democratic Republic of Armenia (1918-1920)

Prime Ministers

*Hovhannes Katchaznouni (30 June 1918 - 28 May 1919)(in Tbilisi, Georgia until 19 July 1918)
*Alexander Khatisyan (28 May 1919 - 5 May 1920)
*Hamazasp Ohandzhanyan (5 May 1920 - 25 November 1920)
*Simeon Nazari Vratsyan (25 November 1920 - 2 December 1920)

Transcaucasian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (1922-1936) and Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic (1936-1991)

Chairmen of the Council of People's Commissars

*Sergey Lukyanovich Lukashin (21 May 1922 - 24 June 1925)
*Sarkis Saakovich Ambartsumyan (24 June 1925 - 22 March 1928) (1st time)
*Sahak Mirzoyevich Ter-Gabrielyan (22 March 1928 - 10 February 1935)
*Abram Abramovich Guloyan (10 February 1935 - February 1937)
*Sarkis Saakovich Ambartsumyan (March 1937 - May 1937) (2nd time)
*Stepan Yegorovich Akopyan (May 1937 - 21 September 1937)
*Aram Sergeyevich Piruzyan (23 November 1937 - October 1943)
*Agasi Solomonovich Sarkisyan (October 1943 - 1946)

Chairmen of the Council of Ministers

*Agasi Solomonovich Sarkisyan (1946 - 29 March 1947)
*Saak Karapetovich Karapetyan (29 March 1947 - November 1952)
*Anton Ervandovich Kochinyan (20 November 1952 - 5 February 1966)
*Badal Amayakovich Muradyan (5 February 1966 - 21 November 1972)
*Grigory Agafonovich Arzumanyan (21 November 1972 - 28 November 1976)
*G.A. Martirosyan (28 November 1976 - 17 January 1977) (acting)
*Fadey Tachatovich Sarkisyan (17 January 1977 - 16 January 1989)
*Vladimir Surenovich Markaryants (16 January 1989 - 13 August 1990)
*Vazgen Mikaelovich Manukyan (13 August 1990 - 25 September 1991)

Republic of Armenia (1991-Present)

Prime Ministers

*Hrant Araratovich Bagratyan (October 1991 - 22 November 1991 (1st time)
*Gagik Garushevich Arutyunyan (22 November 1991 - 30 July 1992)
*Khosrov Melikovich Arutyunyan (30 July 1992 - 2 February 1993)
*Hrant Araratovich Bagratyan (2 February 1993 - 4 November 1996) (2nd time)
*Armen Vartanovich Sarkisyan (4 November 1996 - 20 March 1997
*Robert Sedraki Kocharyan (20 March 1997 - 10 April 1998) (1st time)
*Armen Razmikovich Darbinyan (10 April 1998 - 11 June 1999)
*Vazgen Savenovich Sarkisyan (11 June 1999 - 27 October 1999)Ref_label|Precision|α|none
*Robert Sedraki Kocharyan (29 October 1999 - 3 November 1999) (2nd time, acting)
*Aram Savenovich Sarkisyan (3 November 1999 - 2 May 2000)
*Robert Sedraki Kocharyan (2 May 2000 - 12 May 2000) (3rd time, acting)
*Andranik Nakhapetovich Markaryan (12 May 2000 - 25 March 2007)Ref_label|Supernova|β|none
*Serzh Azati Sarkisyan (26 March 2007 - 9 April 2008)
*Tigran Sargsyan (9 April 2008 - present)

Notes

α. Note_label|Precision|α|none Assassinated while in office in the 1999 Armenian parliament shooting.

β. Note_label|Supernova|β|none Died of heart attack while in office.


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