Almshouse


Almshouse

Almshouses are charitable housing provided to enable people (typically elderly people who can no longer work to earn enough to pay rent) to live in a particular community. They are often targeted at the poor of a locality, at those from certain forms of previous employment, or their widows, and are generally maintained by a charity or the trustees of a bequest.

Almshouses — so named — are European Christian institutions. Alms are, in the Christian tradition, monies or services donated to support the poor and indigent. Almshouses were established from the 10th century in Britain, to provide a place of residence for poor, old and distressed folk. The first recorded Almshouse was founded in York by King Athelstan, and the oldest still in existence is the Hospital of St. Cross in Winchester, dating to circa 990.

In the Middle Ages the majority of European hospitals functioned as almshouses. See the history of hospitals.

Almshouses have been created throughout the period since the 10th century, up to the present day. There is no strict delineation between Almshouses and other forms of sheltered housing, although Almshouses will tend to be characterised by their charitable status and by the aim of supporting the continued independence of their residents.

The almshouses in the village of Woburn, Bedfordshire originated in a bequest by the will of Sir Francis Staunton, 1635, of £40 to the poor, and refounded by John, Duke of Bedford.

In physical form, and owing in part to the antiquity of their formation, Almshouses are often ancient buildings comprising multiple small terraced houses or apartments, and providing accommodation for small numbers of residents; some 2,600 Almshouses continue to be operated in the United Kingdom providing 30,000 dwellings for 36,000 people. In the Netherlands a number of "hofjes" are still functioning as accommodation for elder people (mostly women). The economics of Almshouses takes the form of the provision of subsidised accommodation, often integrated with social care resources such as wardens.

ee also

*Poorhouse
*List of British almshouses
*Blockley Almshouse

References

* [http://www.elderweb.com/home/node/2806 Illustrated History of Long Term Care]
* Hopewell, Peter. "Saint Cross : England’s oldest almshouse", Chichester : Phillimore, 1995.

Further reading

* Caffrey, Helen. 2006. Almshouses in the West Riding of Yorkshire 1600-1900. Heritage, Kings Lynn. ISBN: 1-905223-21-8
* Rothman, David J., (editor). "The Almshouse Experience", in series "Poverty U.S.A.: The Historical Record", 1971. ISBN 0405030924

External links

* [http://www.almshouses.org/ The Almshouse Association]
* [http://www.historyfish.net/monastics/List_houses_A-B.html List of English Almshouses associated with monastic institutions.] (From Public Domain text, English Monastic Life.')
* [http://www.historyfish.net/clay/clay_hospitals.html Medieval Hospitals (Almshouses) of England, by Rotha Mary Clay.] (Public Domain text, including daily life, care, and the 'Office at the Seclusion of a Leper'.)


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  • Almshouse — bezeichnet mehrere gleichnamige, im NRHP gelistete, Objekte: Almshouse (Cambridge), Massachusetts, ID Nr. 82001908 Almshouse (Stoneham), Massachusetts, ID Nr. 84002464 Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demse …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Almshouse — Alms house , n. A house appropriated for the use of the poor; a poorhouse. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • almshouse — (n.) mid 15c., from ALMS (Cf. alms) + HOUSE (Cf. house) (n.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • almshouse — ► NOUN ▪ a house founded by charity, offering accommodation for the poor …   English terms dictionary

  • almshouse — [ämz′hous΄] n. 1. Archaic a home for people too poor to support themselves; poorhouse 2. Brit. a privately endowed home for the disabled or aged poor …   English World dictionary

  • almshouse — /ahmz hows /, n., pl. almshouses / how ziz/. Chiefly Brit. 1. a house endowed by private charity for the reception and support of the aged or infirm poor. 2. (formerly) a poorhouse. [1350 1400; ME almes hous. See ALMS, HOUSE] * * * ▪ American… …   Universalium

  • almshouse — A house for the publicly or privately supported paupers of a city or county; may also be termed a mission . In England an almshouse is not synonymous with a workhouse or poorhouse, being supported by private endowment …   Black's law dictionary

  • almshouse — A house for the publicly or privately supported paupers of a city or county; may also be termed a mission . In England an almshouse is not synonymous with a workhouse or poorhouse, being supported by private endowment …   Black's law dictionary

  • almshouse — noun Date: 14th century 1. British a privately financed home for the poor 2. poorhouse …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • almshouse — noun A building of residence for the poor, sick or elderly of a parish. Originally founded by the Church. Usually a charity relying on donations for funding …   Wiktionary


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