Ciliary processes


Ciliary processes
Ciliary processes
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Interior of anterior half of bulb of eye. (Ciliary process visible at upper right.)
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Sagittal diagram of the eye. Ciliary process visible superior to the lens, immediately above the Zonule of Zinn.
Latin processus ciliares
Gray's subject #225 1010
Artery short posterior ciliary arteries

The ciliary processes are formed by the inward folding of the various layers of the choroid, i.e., the choroid proper and the lamina basalis, and are received between corresponding foldings of the suspensory ligament of the lens.

Anatomy

They are arranged in a circle, and form a sort of frill behind the iris, around the margin of the lens.

They vary from sixty to eighty in number, lie side by side, and may be divided into large and small; the former are about 2.5 mm. in length, and the latter, consisting of about one-third of the entire number, are situated in spaces between them, but without regular arrangement.

They are attached by their periphery to three or four of the ridges of the orbiculus ciliaris, and are continuous with the layers of the choroid: their opposite extremities are free and rounded, and are directed toward the posterior chamber of the eyeball and circumference of the lens.

In front, they are continuous with the periphery of the iris.

Their posterior surfaces are connected with the suspensory ligament of the lens.

Function

The ciliary processes produce aqueous humour.

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained within it may be outdated.


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  • Ciliary — Cil ia*ry, a. [Cf. F. ciliaire.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Anat.) Pertaining to the cilia, or eyelashes. Also applied to special parts of the eye itself; as, the ciliary processes of the choroid coat; the ciliary muscle, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. (Biol.)… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • ciliary body — Anat. the part of the tunic of the eye, between the choroid coat and the iris, consisting chiefly of the ciliary muscle and the ciliary processes. * * * …   Universalium

  • ciliary — 1. Relating to any cilia or hairlike processes, specifically, the eyelashes. 2. Relating to certain of the structures of the eyeball. [Mod. L. ciliaris, relating to or resembling an eyelid, or eyelash, fr. L. cilium, eyelid] * * * cil·i·ary sil ē …   Medical dictionary


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