Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935


Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935

The Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935 called for the United States government to pressure Filipinos to return to the Philippines by offering them free passage back to their native country.

Under the Filipino Repatriation Act of 1935, Filipinos could leave the United States with free transportation and were subject to the quota system established by the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 if they intended to re-enter. The U.S. Family reunification was halted, keeping many Filipinos waiting for years to see family members. A legal change occurred in 1943 allowing Filipinos in the U.S. to lease land, most of which had been owned by Japanese Americans who were in internment camps.

In the October 3, 1938 issue of TIME Magazine, an article entitled " [http://www.time.com/time/archive/preview/0,10987,760236,00.html Philippine Flop] " reported that 1,900 Filipinos had returned to the Philippines.

The repatriation program was declared unconstitutional in 1940, after some 2,190 Filipinos had returned to the Philippines.


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