Induction (play)


Induction (play)

An Induction in a play is an explanatory scene or other intrusion that stands outside and apart from the main action with the intent to comment on it, moralize about it or in the case of dumb show to summarize the plot or underscore what is afoot. Inductions are a common feature of plays written and performed in the Renaissance period, including those of Shakespeare. Example of inductions in Shakespeare are the dumb show in "Hamlet" and the address to the audience by Puck in "A Midsummer Night's Dream". Another example, in "The Spanish Tragedy" by Thomas Kyd, is the introduction to that play by the ghost of Andrea who preps the audience by laying out the story to come.


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  • Induction — Most common meanings * Inductive reasoning, used in science and the scientific method * Mathematical induction, a method of proof in the field of mathematics * Electromagnetic induction in physics and engineering Other articles * Induction (play) …   Wikipedia

  • Induction — • Induction is the conscious mental process by which we pass from the perception of particular phenomena (things and events) to the knowledge of general truths Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Induction     Induction …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Induction — In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction coil — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction pipe — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction port — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction valve — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • induction — inductionless, adj. /in duk sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of inducing, bringing about, or causing: induction of the hypnotic state. 2. the act of inducting; introduction; initiation. 3. formal installation in an office, benefice, or the like. 4. Logic.… …   Universalium

  • induction — noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of inducting (as into office) b. an initial experience ; initiation c. the formality by which a civilian is inducted into military service 2. a. (1) inference of a generalized conclusion from… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Electro-dynamic induction — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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