List of airships of the United States Navy


List of airships of the United States Navy

This is a list of airships of the United States Navy

Rigid Airships

*(ZR-1) "Shenandoah" - 1923-25 (crashed)
*(ZR-2) R38 (see below) - 1921 (crashed)
*(ZR-3) "Los Angeles" - 1924-39
*ZMC-2, a metalclad-airship built by the Aircraft Development Corp - 1929-41
*(ZRS-4) "Akron" - 1931-33 (crashed)
*(ZRS-5) "Macon" - 1933-35 (crashed)

ZR-2 was bought from Britain where construction had been started on it as the "R38" before cancellation. It was bought in October 1919, but crashed in 1921 before the US Navy could take delivery of it and did not officially receive its US designation, though it was painted in accordance of its planned Navy designation.

emi-Rigid Airships

*O-1 Airship, a semi-rigid purchased from Italy

Blimps (non-rigid airships)

*DN-1-Class Blimp
*B-Class Blimp
*British Blimps operated by the USN
*French Blimps operated by the USN
*C-Class Blimp
*D-Class Blimp
*E-Class Blimp
*F-Class Blimp
*H-Class Blimp
*K-1 Blimp
*G-Class Blimp (ZNN-G)
*J-Class Blimp
*K-Class Blimp (ZNP-K)
*L-Class Blimp (ZNN-L)
*M-Class Blimp (ZNP-M)
*N-Class Blimp (ZNP-N)
*ZS2G-1 Blimps
*ZPG-3W, biggest blimp ever built

Post Cold War blimps

*MZ-3A, first Navy airship in 40 years

References

*Shock, James R., "U.S. Navy Airships 1915-1962, Edgewater, Florida, Atlantis Productions, 2001, ISBN 0-9639743-8-6
*Althoff, William F., "Sky Ships" New York, Orion Books, 1990, ISBN 0-517-56904-3
*Allen, Hugh, "The Story of the Airship (non-rigid), Akron, Ohio, 1943
*Mowthorpe, Ces, "Battle Bags," Phoenix Mil, Far Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucsterschire, England, Allan Sutton Publishing, 1995
*Ventry, Lord & Kolesnik, Eugen M., "Airship Saga," Poole, Dorset, Britain, Blanford Press, 1982, ISBN 0-07137-1001-2
*Grossnick, Roy A., "Kite Balloons to Airships. . . the Navy's Lighter-than-air Experience,", Washington, Government Printing Office, 1986
*Vaeth, J. Gordon, "Blimps & U-Boats", Annapolis, Maryland, US Naval Institute Press, 1992, ISBN1-55750-876-3


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