Thrust


Thrust

Thrust is a reaction force described quantitatively by Newton's Second and Third Laws. When a system expels or accelerates mass in one direction the accelerated mass will cause a proportional but opposite force on that system.

Examples

A fixed-wing aircraft generates forward thrust when air is pushed in the opposite direction of flight. This can be done in several ways including by the spinning blades of a propeller, or a rotating turbine pushing air out the back of a jet engine, or by ejecting hot gases with a rocket engine. The forward thrust is proportional to the mass of the airstream multiplied by the velocity of the airstream. Reverse thrust can be generated to aid braking after landing by reversing the pitch of variable pitch propeller blades, or using a thrust reverser on a jet engine. Rotary wing aircraft and thrust vectoring V/STOL aircraft use engine thrust to support the weight of the aircraft, and vector some of this thrust fore and aft to control forward speed.

A motorboat generates thrust (or reverse thrust) when the propellers are turned to accelerate water backwards (or forwards). The resulting thrust pushes the boat in the opposite direction to the sum of the momentum change in the water flowing through the propeller.

A rocket's mass is propelled forward by a thrust force equal to, and opposite of, the time-rate of momentum change of the exhaust mass accelerated from the combustion chamber through the rocket engine nozzle. This is the exhaust velocity with respect to the rocket, times the time-rate at which the mass is expelled, or in mathematical terms::mathbf{T}=frac{dm}{dt}mathbf{v} where:
* T is the thrust generated (force); some texts use the symbol Fth
* frac {dm} {dt} is the rate of change of mass with respect to time (fuel burn rate);
* v is the exhaust velocity.

Of course, for a launch the thrust at lift-off should be more than the weight, and with a fair margin, because a "slow launch" would be very inefficient.

Each of the three Space shuttle main engines can produce a thrust of 1.8 MN, and each of its two Solid Rocket Boosters 14.7 MN, together 39.4 MN. Compare with the mass at lift-off of 2,040,000 kg, hence a weight of 20 MN.

By contrast, the simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) has 24 thrusters of 3.56 N each.

In the air breathing category, the AMT-USA AT-180 jet engine developed for radio-controlled aircraft produce 90 N (20 Lbf) of thrust. [cite web
url = http://usamt.com/Mel/comm/comm_products.html
title = AMT-USA jet engine product information
accessdate = 2006-12-13
] The GE90-115B engines fitted on the Boeing 777-300ER, recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the "World's Most Powerful Commercial Jet Engine," have a tested thrust of 569 kN (127,900 lbf).

References

ee also

*Aerodynamic force
*Gimballed thrust, the most common thrust system in modern rockets
*Thrust-to-weight ratio
*Thrust vectoring
*Tractive effort


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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Thrust — Thrust, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Thrust}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thrusting}.] [OE. ?rusten, ?risten, ?resten, Icel. ?r?st? to thrust, press, force, compel; perhaps akin to E. threat.] 1. To push or drive with force; to drive, force, or impel; to shove; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thrust — Thrust, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Thrust}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thrusting}.] [OE. ?rusten, ?risten, ?resten, Icel. ?r?st? to thrust, press, force, compel; perhaps akin to E. threat.] 1. To push or drive with force; to drive, force, or impel; to shove; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • thrust — /thrust/, v., thrust, thrusting, n. v.t. 1. to push forcibly; shove; put or drive with force: He thrust his way through the crowd. She thrust a dagger into his back. 2. to put boldly forth or impose acceptance of: to thrust oneself into a… …   Universalium

  • Thrust — Thrust, n. 1. A violent push or driving, as with a pointed weapon moved in the direction of its length, or with the hand or foot, or with any instrument; a stab; a word much used as a term of fencing. [1913 Webster] [Polites] Pyrrhus with his… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • thrust — [thrust] vt. thrust, thrusting [ME thrusten, thristen < ON thrysta < IE * treud , to squeeze, push > THREAT, L trudere] 1. to push with sudden force; shove; drive 2. to pierce; stab 3. to force or impose (oneself or another) upon someone …   English World dictionary

  • Thrust — Thrust, v. i. 1. To make a push; to attack with a pointed weapon; as, a fencer thrusts at his antagonist. [1913 Webster] 2. To enter by pushing; to squeeze in. [1913 Webster] And thrust between my father and the god. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • thrust — ► VERB (past and past part. thrust) 1) push suddenly or violently. 2) make one s way forcibly. 3) project conspicuously: the jetty thrust out into the water. 4) (thrust on/upon) impose (something) unwelcome on. ► NOUN …   English terms dictionary

  • thrust — [n1] point of communication burden, core, effect, gist, meaning, meat*, pith*, purport, sense, short, substance, upshot; concept 682 thrust [n2] forward movement advance, blitz, boost, drive, impetus, impulsion, jump, lunge, momentum, onset,… …   New thesaurus

  • Thrust — Thrust, n. & v. Thrist. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thrust — Album par Herbie Hancock Sortie 1974 Enregistrement août 1974 à Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco Durée 48:01 Genre Jazz fusion, funk Producteur Da …   Wikipédia en Français


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