Donativum


Donativum
Roman Millitary banner.svg
This article is part of the series on:
Military of ancient Rome (portal)
753 BC – AD 476
Structural history
Roman army (unit types and ranks, legions, auxiliaries, generals)
Roman navy (fleets, admirals)
Campaign history
Lists of wars and battles
Decorations and punishments
Technological history
Military engineering (castra, siege engines, arches, roads)
Political history
Strategy and tactics
Infantry tactics
Frontiers and fortifications (limes, Hadrian's Wall)
This box: view · talk · edit

Donativum (plural donativa) was the name given to the gifts of money dispersed to the soldiers of the Roman legions or to the Praetorian Guard by the Roman Emperors.

The purpose of the donativa varied: some were expressions of gratitude for favors received, and others out right bribery for favors expected in return. Donativa were normally rendered at the beginning of each new emperor's reign. During the 2nd and 3rd centuries, this form of bribery became a crucial part of any successful ruler in Rome. Such was the case with many of the soldier-emperors from 235 to 248. The Praetorian Guard, intimate to the emperor's person, was an even greater threat to security. The cohorts stationed in Rome were difficult to appease and quick to commit assassination. The donativum thus provided a terrific way to purchase the Guards' support and loyalty.

Emperor Augustus bequeathed the Praetorian Guard a substantial sum in his will, but it was not until Tiberius' reign that gifts of money were thought mandatory. The Praetorian Guard received such gifts for turning a blind eye when Sejanus, their prefect, fell from power. Each Praetorian Guard received 10 gold pieces for refraining from defending Sejanus's. In 41, after the assassination of Caligula, the Guard supported Claudius, and after a brief time the Senate learned that the Guard had installed him on the throne. Claudius gave them 150 gold pieces, or some 3,750 denarii, to which the senators' 100 sesterces were added annually to commemorate Claudius's accession. The inevitable result of the custom of the donativum was the Praetorians' auctioning of the Empire to Didius Julianus in 193.


Imperial Donativa to the Praetorian Guard 14 - 193
Year Emperor Provocation Denarii
14 Augustus Last will 250
31 Tiberius Loyalty in Sejanus crisis 1,000
37 Caligula Upon accession 500
41 Claudius Upon accession 3,750
Annually Claudius Anniversary of accession to the throne 25
54 Nero Accession 3,750
Pay for assassinations 500 or less
69 Galba Promised by Nymphidius Sabinus, but not paid 7,500
69 Otho Promised 1,250
69 Vitellius Promised 1,250
69 Vespasian Regular donativum unknown
79 Titus Regular donativum unknown
81 Domitian Considered doubling the donativum but opted for regular sum unknown
96 Nerva Regular donativum unknown
98 Trajan Regular donativum unknown
117 Hadrian Double normal sum unknown
138 Antoninus Pius Regular donativum and upon daughter's marriage unknown
161 Marcus Aurelius Joint rule vith Verus 5,000
180 Commodus Regular donativum; second promised but unpaid unknown
193 Pertinax Forced to pay donativum of Commodus 3,000
193 Didius Julianus Purchased the throne 7,250
193 Septimius Severus Promised a donativum but paid less 250

See also


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Donativum — (Plural: Donativa) war der Name, der im Römischen Reich den Geldgeschenken gegeben wurde, die die römischen Kaiser unter die Soldaten der Legionen oder der Prätorianergarde verteilten. Der Zweck des Donativum variierte, einige waren Ausdruck der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • DONATIVUM — apud Ael. Lamprid. in Heliog. Post contionem pronuntiavit his quasi militibus, ternos aureos donativum: quae Donativi summa legitima erat, Salmas. ad Lamprid. in Alex. Seu. Casaub. Pertinacem in singulos denarium trina milia promisisse, docet ad… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • donativum — DONATÍVUM s.n. (ist.) Dar în bani acordat soldaţilor de împăraţii romani la urcarea lor pe tron. [< lat. donativum]. Trimis de LauraGellner, 25.02.2005. Sursa: DN …   Dicționar Român

  • Donatīvum — (lat.), bei den Römern Geldgeschenk an die Soldaten, wurde in der Republik bei Triumphen, unter den Kaisern bei feierlichen Anlässen (Thronbesteigungen, Geburtstagen etc.) verteilt (vgl. Congiarium). Donativgelder heißen die Geldleistungen der… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • donativum — ● donativum nom masculin (mot latin) Distribution d argent faite aux soldats sous la République romaine, à la suite des triomphes, ou par les empereurs à l occasion de leur avènement …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Donativum — Sous l Empire romain, un donativum est une récompense exceptionnelle accordée à un corps de troupe, généralement équivalente à plusieurs années de solde. Les prétoriens (garde personnelle de l empereur) reçoivent fréquemment un donativum :… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Donativum (horse) — Donativum is a British thoroughbred racehorse and winner of the 2008 Breeders Cup Juvenile Turf. Categories: Thoroughbred racehorsesBritish racehorsesBreeders Cup Juvenile Turf winners …   Wikipedia

  • Donativa — Donativum Sous l Empire romain, un donativum est une récompense exceptionnelle accordée à un corps de troupe, généralement équivalente à plusieurs années de solde. Les prétoriens (garde personnelle de l empereur) reçoivent fréquemment un… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Donativ — Donativum (Plural: Donativa) war der Name, der im Römischen Reich den Geldgeschenken gegeben wurde, die die römischen Kaiser unter die Soldaten der Legionen oder der Prätorianergarde verteilten. Der Zweck des Donativum variierte, einige waren… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Garde Prétorienne — Monarchie romaine 753 – 509 av. J. C. République romaine 509 – 27 av. J. C. Empire romain 27 av. J. C. – 476 Empire byzantin 395 – 1453 …   Wikipédia en Français


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.