List of defunct retailers of the United States


List of defunct retailers of the United States

Across the United States, a large number of local stores and store chains that started between the 1920s and 1950s have become defunct since the late 1960s, when many chains were either consolidated or liquidated. Some have been lost due to mergers. Below is a list of defunct retailers of the United States.

Contents

Automotive

  • 10,000 Auto Parts — Midwest; bought out by Champion Auto
  • Al's Auto Parts — Washington state; purchased by Schuck's
  • CSK Auto — nationwide; bought out by O'Reilly Auto Parts in 2008
  • Action Auto - started in Flint, Michigan, and expanded regionally before ceasing operations
  • Auto Palace
  • Auto Works
  • Big A Auto Parts — bought out by Bumper to Bumper auto parts
  • Big Wheel/Rossi Auto Parts
  • Bumper to Bumper Auto Parts — Midwest; very large chain that was sold to O'Reilly Auto Parts
  • Champion Auto — Minnesota/Midwest; large chain of locally owned auto parts stores; many closed and the few left were bought out by Bumper to Bumper Auto Parts
  • Checker Auto Parts — purchased by CSK Auto, Inc.; acquired by O'Reilly Auto Parts in 2008 and brand phased out
  • Chief Auto Parts — Southwest and Midwest; merged with AutoZone in 1998
  • Crown Auto Parts — bought out by Champion Auto
  • Kragen Auto Parts — purchased by CSK Auto, Inc.; acquired by O'Reilly Auto Parts in 2008 and brand phased out
  • Murray's Discount Auto Stores — purchased by CSK Auto, Inc.; acquired by O'Reilly Auto Parts in 2008 and brand phased out
  • National Auto Parts
  • Parts America
  • Oklahoma Tire & Supply Company — OTASCO
  • Schucks Auto Supply — purchased by CSK Auto, Inc.; acquired by O'Reilly Auto Parts in 2008 and brand phased out
  • STM Auto Parts — large Chain that failed in the early 1990s
  • Super Shops
  • Thrift Auto Parts — Kansas
  • Trak Auto — Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, and West Coast; purchased by Advance Auto Parts in 2002
  • Western Auto — nationwide, once had 1,800 locations, purchased by Sears in 1987 and sold to Advance Auto Parts in 1998. Still operates in Puerto Rico.
  • Wheels Discount Auto - (Conglomerated with Fay's Drug and Paper Cutter) - Acquired by Parts America, subsequently purchased by Advance Auto Parts
  • Whitlocks Auto Supply — Wichita, Kansas

Catalog showrooms

Many long-established catalog merchants have gone out of business in recent years.

  • Ardan's — originally was a members only catalog showroom exclusively for members of the military as well as federal, city, state and plant/industrial employees. Converted to an all-inclusive format around 1975 before eventually being acquired by Service Merchandise in 1985. And although some stores were converted, the majority were ultimately abandoned
  • BASCO — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area; acquired by Best Products
  • Bennett Brothers — New York City area
  • Block Distributors — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area
  • Best Products — ceased business in 1998 after filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 1996
  • Brand Names — operated in Buffalo, New York
  • Brendle's — operated 58 showrooms in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee; closed in 1996, a few months after filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time
  • Century House
  • Consumers and Consumers Express
  • Dahlkemper's — operated in Pennsylvania
  • David Weis/Jewel Mart
  • Golden's Distributors
  • Evans
  • Ellman's Catalog Showrooms — Atlanta, Georgia; merged in 1986 with Service Merchandise
  • Great Western — part of Modern Merchandising; acquired by Best Products in 1982
  • John Plain
  • H. J. Wilson & Company
  • Jafco — acquired by Modern Merchandising in 1972; Modern Merchandising was acquired by Best Products in 1982
  • K's Merchandise
  • K&G Distributors — Chicago Loop (Chicago, Illinois); building demolished for state office building
  • LaBelle's — part of Modern Merchandising; acquired by Best Products in 1982
  • Leonard Krower & Sons
  • Luria's — Florida
  • McDade's
  • Mostow Co. — Skokie, Illinois
  • Present Company — operated several stores in Rochester, New York area
  • Rink's
  • Service Merchandise — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 1999; ceased operations by early 2002. The name was resurrected in 2004 for an online retail operation
  • Standard Sales — operated seven stores in Florida; acquired by Modern Merchandising in the 1970s
  • W. Bell & Co.
  • Wilson's Jewelers — Southern states, based in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; acquired by Service Merchandise in 1986
  • Witmark — operated in southwestern Michigan; founded 1969, liquidated 1997

Clothing, shoes, & specialty stores

  • A.J. August Fashion Wear — not to be confused with A.J. August Tuxedos of St. Joseph, Missouri
  • Afterthoughts — Woolworth; sold to Claire's
  • Anderson-Little — men's specialty retailer originally associated with a large Massachusetts-based men's clothing manufacturer; also known as Anderson Little-Richman Brothers; owned for many years by F. W. Woolworth Company; sold to Cliftex Corporation and incorporated into its Gentlemen's Wearhouse subsidiary in 1993; ceased operations in 1997, but was restarted in 2008 by the grandson and great-grandson of the original founder[1][2][3][4][5]
  • Allied City Stores
  • Anthony's
  • Britches of Georgetown — including casual brand stores: Britches Great Outdoors, Britches, and Britches for Women
  • Brooks Fashions
  • Bugle Boy
  • Carl Durfees
  • Chandlers
  • Casual Corner
  • Charles A. Stevens and Chas stores — Chicago, Illinois area
  • Cherry & Webb — CWT/Cherry, Webb & Touraine
  • Chess King
  • County Seat
  • De Pinna
  • d.e.m.o.
  • Desmonds Formal Wear
  • De-Jaiz Mens Clothing
  • Eli Moore Inc
  • Endicott Johnson
  • Endicott Shoes
  • Erlebacher's
  • Father & Son
  • Fayva
  • Flagg Bros. Shoes
  • Foot Quarters — Kinney/Woolworth
  • Foreman & Clark
  • Forth & Towne
  • Foxmoor
  • Frank and Seder
  • Franklin Simon
  • Gallenkamp
  • Gantos
  • Great Clothes
  • Gottschalks
  • Grodins
  • Hanover Shoe
  • Harold's/Harold Powell — Norman, Oklahoma
  • Hastings — not to be confused with gohastings.com
  • Hit or Miss
  • Hudson's MensWear
  • Hughes & Hatcher — Detroit, Michigan
  • Henry's — Wichita, Kansas
  • Heslop's
  • I. Magnin
  • id Boutiques — Wisconsin-based, Upper Midwest, Midwest, and Plains regions
  • Jack Lang
  • JasmineSola — purchased by New York & Company in 2005 and liquidated by the end of FY2007
  • J. Brannam — was Woolworth; liquidated
  • J. Riggings
  • Jacob Reed and Sons — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area
  • Janeville
  • Jay Jacobs
  • Jeans Unlimited
  • Joseph Magnin
  • Judy's
  • Just For Feet
  • K's Merchandise
  • KG Menswear
  • Karl's Shoes
  • Kent's
  • Kinney Shoes
  • Kleinhans — Buffalo, New York
  • Klopfenstein's
  • Laura Ashley
  • Laura Ashley Mother & Child
  • Little Folk Shops/Kids Mart — Woolworth
  • Littler's
  • L.L. Berger — Buffalo, New York
  • Mansmann's Department Store — Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Marianne
  • Maurice The Pants Man — New England, New York, Pennsylvania
  • Merry-Go-Round (retailer)
  • Mervyn's
  • Miller & Rhoads
  • Mode O'Day
  • Morville — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area
  • Nan Duskin
  • National Shirt Shop
  • Nobil
  • Northern Reflections — Woolworth
  • P. Samuels Men's Clothiers - Corsicana, Texas
  • Parade of Shoes
  • Parklane Hosiery — bankrupt in 1991
  • Patterson-Fletcher — Fort Wayne, Indiana
  • Paul Harris — Great Lakes region
  • Piccolo Mondo — Puget Sound (Washington state) region
  • Pomeroy's
  • Poore Simon's — New England, New York, Pennsylvania; sister chain to Maurice The Pants Man
  • Raleigh's — a.k.a. Raleigh Haberrdasher
  • Ransohoffs
  • Richman Brothers — men's specialty store based in Cleveland, Ohio; sold to F.W. Woolworth in 1969; operated for a time as Anderson Little-Richman Brothers, finally folded in 1992.[6][7]
  • Robert Hall
  • Rogers Peet — New York City and branches
  • Roos/Atkins
  • Ruehl No. 925 — concept brand launched by Abercrombie and Fitch in 2004; poor sales and operating losses led to A & F ceasing operations of Ruehl in early 2010.
  • Sagebrush — sold Levi's blue jeans
  • Saks-34th Street
  • The Sample — Buffalo, New York
  • Scott Ties
  • Sherman's — Detroit, Michigan
  • Shoe Kicks
  • Shoe Pavilion
  • Shoe Town
  • Silverwoods
  • Smiths[disambiguation needed ]
  • Steve & Barry's
  • Susie's Casuals — Kinney/Woolworth division
  • TheBottomHalf — Meis Bros/Brown Group
  • Thalhimers
  • The Warner Brothers Store
  • Tee Town
  • Thom McAn Store
  • Today's Man
  • William Wanamaker & Sons
  • Woolf Brothers
  • Weathervane

Department and discount stores

See List of defunct department stores of the United States

Drug stores

Electronics stores

Five-and-dime/Variety stores

Furniture stores

  • Aaronson Furniture
  • Bay Furniture
  • Bloom Brothers Furniture
  • Bombay Company — U.S. stores
  • Buckeye Furniture
  • Castro Convertibles — primarily Northeast and Southeast U.S.
  • Crandall's Fine Furniture
  • Discount Furniture Showcase
  • Fradkin Brothers Furniture — Baltimore County, Maryland
  • Glicks Furniture — Columbus, Ohio; bought out by Rhodes Furniture in the late 1990s
  • Heilig-Meyers
  • House Of Denmark — bankrupt as of 2007
  • Huffman and Boyle — later Huffman-Koos
  • J. B. Van Sciver
  • John F. Lawhon
  • John M. Smyth's Homemakers — bankrupt as of 2005
  • Joshua Doore — Detroit, Michigan
  • Krauses Sofa Factory — primarily California and West Coast
  • L' Fish
  • Leath Furniture — bankrupt July 2007
  • Levitz Furniture
  • Linens 'n Things
  • McMahan's Furniture — primarily California; purchased by Heilig-Meyers
  • Nelson Brothers — Chicago, Illinois; purchased by Heilig-Meyers
  • Plunkett Home Furnishings
  • Rhodes Furniture
  • Roberd's
  • Robinson Furniture — Detroit, Michigan
  • Sears Homelife
  • Seamans Furniture — merged into Levitz Furniture in 2005
  • Sofa Express
  • Wickes Furniture — bankrupt February 3, 2008

Grocery stores and supermarkets

  • Alpha Beta
  • ABC Markets
  • ABCO Foods
  • AJ Bayless
  • Alexander's
  • Almacs
  • Angelo's
  • Baltimore Markets
  • Bettendorf's
  • Big Apple
  • Big Bear Stores
  • Big D Supermarkets
  • H.C. Bohack — Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island, New York
  • Boys Markets
  • Buttrey Food and Drug
  • Buehler Foods — operated as Buehler's Buy-Low
  • Canal Villere — New Orleans, Louisiana; acquired by Loblaw corporation, later sold to Schweggmann
  • Cardinal Stores — locations rebranded Lucky
  • Carter's Foods
  • Chatham — Detroit, Michigan area
  • Clemens Markets — suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; acquired by Giant in 2006
  • Coffey's Market
  • Colonial Stores
    • Albers Super Markets
    • Big Star Markets
    • Pender's Food Stores
    • Rogers Food Stores
    • Stop and Shop
  • Consumers Food and Drug
  • Country Club Markets
  • County Market
  • Del Farm — Owned by National Tea
  • Delchamps
  • Eagle Food Centers
  • Eisner Food Stores — Acquired by Jewel Food Stores, rebranded in 1981
  • Edwards — joined Ahold to become Stop & Shop
  • Elm Farm — Owned by National Tea
  • Expo Superstore — Vons big box format; Southern California
  • FamilyMart — A&P
  • Farmer JackA&P
  • Finast
  • Fisher Foods
  • Food Barn
  • Food Fair — later Pantry Pride
  • Food Giant
  • Food Mart
  • Gene Walter's Marketplace
  • Giant — Ralphs big box format; Southern California
  • Giant Open Air — Merged with Farm Fresh Food & Pharmacy
  • Grand Union
  • Greenwich IGA — Greenwich, New York
  • Golden Dawn — some stores still operate in Pennsylvania and Ohio
  • Hamady Bros. Supermarkets - Well-known supermarket chain in Genesee County, Michigan rocked by fraud scandal. Bankruptcy soon followed and the decades old chain was foced out of business.
  • Harvest Foods — last surviving stores all located in Arkansas
  • Hills Supermarkets
  • Hughes Markets
  • Jitney Jungle
  • Johnson's General Stores
  • Kash n' Karry, now Sweetbay Supermarket
  • Kessel Food Market
  • Kohl's Food Stores
  • Laneco — Eastern Pennsylvania/Western New Jersey
  • Larry's Markets
  • Liberal — Dayton, Ohio
  • LoRay — San Francisco Bay area
  • Loblaws — Northeastern Ohio
  • Mr. AG's — Kansas; part of the IGA chain; last store closed in 1970
  • Mr. D's IGA — Wichita, Kansas
  • MacMarr Stores — merged with Safeway Inc. in 1931
  • Maloley's Finer Foods — Northeastern Indiana
  • Market Basket — Southern California; was owned by Kroger[10]
  • Martin's
  • National Tea
  • O.K. Fairbanks
  • Olson's Market
  • Omni SuperstoreDominick's big box format
  • Packer
  • Pak and Save
  • Pantry Food Stores — Los Angeles, California area
  • Pantry Pride
  • Pay'N Takeit — merged with Safeway Inc. in 1935
  • Penn Fruit — later Top Value
  • Peter Reeves
  • Purity — San Francisco Bay area
  • Purity Supreme — Boston area
  • Paul's Food Mart — central New York State
  • Rack N Sack
  • Red Food — Chattanooga, Tennessee area; acquired by Bi-Lo Stores
  • Red Robin Stores
  • Red Owl — Chicago, Illinois stores only; sold to National Tea
  • Sampson's
  • Sanitary Grocery Stores — Washington, D.C.-area stores were acquired by Safeway Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland-area stores were acquired by Twin Food Stores[11]
  • Sav-A-Center — A&P in the New Orleans, Louisiana region
  • Schweggmanns — New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Skaggs-Alpha Beta
  • Smitty's Food and Drug
  • Standard Food — later Standard Dell Farms — Central Indiana
  • Stop N Shop — Sacramento, California
  • Sun Foods — acquired by Hannaford
  • Sunflower Market — Closed in 2008
  • Super Duper
  • Super Place
  • Super Saver Foods — a U.S. east coast version became an Acme brand
  • Sure Save — Chicago, Illionois; owned by National Tea, stores changed to National Tea
  • Thompson
  • Thorofare — Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Youngstown, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Tianguis — Vons' Hispanic format; Southern California
  • Town and Country Convenience Stores — acquired by 7-Eleven around 1998
  • Tradewell
  • Thriftway Food Mart
  • Twin Food Stores — Baltimore, Maryland-area; spinoff of Sanitary Grocery Stores[11]
  • Walt's IGA — Wichita, Kansas
  • Weingarten's
  • White Hen Pantry — merged with 7-Eleven in mid 2007.
  • Wild Oats Markets
  • Ukrop's Super Market — Virginia area, acquired by Giant-Carlisle and was rebranded as Martin's Food Stores
  • Unity Frankford Stores — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area
  • Williams Bros. — California Central Coast area

Home improvement

Home decor and craft stores

  • Angel's
  • Bombay Company
  • Budget Power
  • Cloth World — merged into Jo-Ann Fabrics
  • Crafts & More
  • Crafts Canada
  • DGS HomeSource
  • FlowerTime — purchased by Frank's Nursery & Crafts
  • Frame Scene — Woolworth
  • Frank's Nursery & Crafts
  • HouseWorks!
  • Lee Wards
  • Museum Company
  • Old America Stores — bankrupt 1999; liquidated remaining stores
  • Piece Goods Fabric and craft supplies, purchased by Mae's Fabrics; Mae's subsequently sold to Hancock Fabrics
  • Pleasures and Pasttimes — Buffalo, New York
  • Rainbow Bay Crafts
  • Shabby Chic
  • Sew-Fro Fabrics Liquidated in 1998; remaining or empty stores purchased by Jo-Ann Fabrics
  • Standard Brands Paint Company
  • Waccamaw's Homeplace/Waccamaw Pottery
  • Wells & Wade — Wenatchee, Washington; opened 1915, closed 1993

Music and video stores (records, tapes, books, CDs, DVDs, etc.)

  • Argus Tapes & Records
  • Borders Books
  • Blockbuster Music — some locations converted to Wherehouse Music; majority were abandoned
  • Budget Tapes & Records — Kansas
  • Camelot Music — converted to FYE stores
  • Cavages — Buffalo, New York
  • Cellophane Square
  • Circuit City
  • Coconut's — like Record Town, all locations were converted into FYE stores
  • Compact Disc Center
  • Crown Books
  • Disc Jockey
  • Flipside Records — Chicago, Illinois area
  • Franklin Music
  • Great American Music
  • Harmony House — Michigan
  • Hollywood Video
  • Incredible Universe
  • King Carol
  • Licorice Pizza — California
  • Listenin' Booth
  • Madcats Music & Books
  • Media Play — closed and dissolved in 2006
  • Movie Gallery — some Midwestern Stores were converted to Family Video, but some former buildings in the region are abandoned
  • Music Boutique — Seattle
  • Music Den
  • Music Plus — California
  • Musicland — Minnesota
  • National Record Mart — Pennsylvania
  • Odyssey Records & Tapes
  • On Cue
  • Oranges Records & Tapes
  • Paul's Record Hut — New Rochelle, New York; Paul, Paula, Paddy, Andy
  • Peaches
  • Rainbow Records — Oklahoma City
  • Record & Tape Outlet (later CD & Tape Outlet ) — Ohio
  • Record Bar — malls
  • Record Town — store name changed to FYE by parent company Trans World Entertainment
  • Record World
  • Rose Records — Chicago, Illinois area
  • Sam Goody — most locations converted to FYE, but a small number of locations continue to operate as Sam Goody
  • Sammy's Record Shack — St. Louis?
  • Saturday Matinee - acquired by Record Town before becoming FYE.
  • Second Time Around
  • Soul Sounds Unlimited
  • Sound Warehouse — acquired by Blockbuster Inc.; subsequently converted some stores to Blockbuster Music, the remainder to Blockbuster Video
  • Sounds of Soul Records & Tapes
  • Square Circle
  • Starship Tapes & Records — Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Strawberries — Massachusetts
  • Suncoast Video
  • Tape World
  • Tower Records — converted to an online-only retailer
  • Turtle's Records & Tapes
  • The Record Shops at TSS
  • The Wall — formerly Wall To Wall Sound & Video
  • Waves Music
  • Wherehouse Music
  • Vinyl Fever — small Florida record store chain; went out of business January 2011
  • Virgin Megastores
  • Yesterday's Records/Discs — Wichita, Kansas
  • Chandler's — Evanston, Illinois and Chicago, Illinois suburbs
  • J. K. Gill — Pacific Northwest; office supply stores
  • Keeney's — Seattle, Washington?
  • Office Warehouse — division of Home Quarters
  • Paper Cutter — New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania; division of Fay's Drug
  • Tam's Stationers — Los Angeles, California
  • Ulbrich's — Buffalo, New York
  • Unity Stationers — Chicago; The retail division of United Stationer's Supply, which is still in business

Camping, sports or athletic stores

  • AdventureSports!
  • AM/PM Camp
  • Copeland Sports
  • Galyan's — bought by Dick's; locations converted to Dick's
  • Gart Sports
  • Dave Cooks — Denver
  • Dick Fischers Buffalo, New York
  • G.I. Joe's — Oregon and Washington
  • Gold Medal (Philadelphia area
  • Golf Augusta Pro Shops
  • Herman's World of Sporting Goods
  • Irving's Sporting Goods
  • JumboSports
  • Mages — Chicago
  • Morrie Mages — Chicago, started by one of the Mages Bros after the closing of Mages) stores sold to Sportmart
  • MVP Sports — New England, bought by Decathlon, who exited the U.S. market altogether soon after.
  • Oshman's
  • Olympic Sports — Seattle, Washington
  • Security Sporting Goods — New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Sportmart
  • Sports Town USA
  • Sports Unlimited
  • Sportswest
  • Sunny's Surplus
  • Warshal's

Toy stores

Warehouse clubs and membership department stores

  • American Wholesale Club
  • Bodega Club
  • Club Wholesale
  • CBSS (Consumers Buying Service Store)
  • DGS VolMAX
  • Edwards
  • Fedco
  • Gemco — Known as Memco in the Washington, D.C. region
  • GEX — short for Government Exchange, but a private retailer; also known as G.E.M and G.E.S
  • Gov Mart
  • E.J. Korvette
  • Metro (Chicago, Illinois area) — later acquired by BJ's Wholesale Club
  • Pace Membership Warehouse
  • Price Club — merged with Costco
  • PriceRite Warehouse Club
  • Price Savers
  • Source Club
  • Warehouse Club, Inc.
  • Wholesale Club, Inc.

Restaurants

References

  1. ^ "Woolworth's to shut Anderson Little chain. (F.W. Woolworth Co. closes Anderson Little-Richman Brothers)". Highbeam.com. 1992-04-06. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-12107513.html. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  2. ^ "Gentlemen's Wear-House chain using Anderson-Little Logo.". Highbeam.com. 1993-09-24. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-14436929.html. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  3. ^ "Bell tolls for Anderson-Little. (Men's clothing retailer to close in New England in early 1997)". Highbeam.com. 1996-09-16. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-18692047.html. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  4. ^ "NewStandard: 11/18/96". Archive.southcoasttoday.com. 1996-11-18. http://archive.southcoasttoday.com/daily/11-96/11-18-96/a01lo008.htm. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  5. ^ Welker, Grant (2008-07-16). "Anderson-Little is back in fashion — Fall River, Massachusetts". The Herald News. http://www.heraldnews.com/business/x1768848155/Anderson-Little-is-back-in-fashion. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  6. ^ "Encyclopedia of Cleveland History:RICHMAN BROTHERS CO". Ech.case.edu. 1997-06-20. http://ech.case.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=RBC. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  7. ^ "COMPANY NEWS — Richman Chain Will Be Closed". New York Times. 1992-04-03. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CEFD91430F930A35757C0A964958260. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  8. ^ "Sound Advice starts liquidation sales, will shut down". St. Petersburg Times. Tampabay.com. http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/retail/article891247.ece. Retrieved 2010-06-19. 
  9. ^ Weber, Bruce (November 27, 2008). "Sandy Ruby, Co-Founder of Tech Hifi, Dies at 67". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/27/business/27ruby.html. Retrieved May 8, 2010. 
  10. ^ More Stores
  11. ^ a b "G. E. Lowman and Twin Food Stores". Twin Food Stores—Baltimore (Md.) area supermarkets of yesteryear. Atlas Communications. 2010. http://atlascom.us/TwinFood.htm. Retrieved 2010-01-28. 

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