Kohen Gadol


Kohen Gadol

Kohen Gadol or Kohen ha-Gadol (Heb. כהן גדול "Great Priest") is the title of of early Israelite religion and of classical Judaism from the rise of the Israelite nation until the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem. The high priests, like all priests, belonged to the Aaronic line.

Biblical data

Aaron, though he is but rarely called "the great priest," being generally simply designated as "ha-kohen" (the priest), was the first incumbent of the office, to which he was appointed by God (Book of Exodus ). [Cf. Josephus, "Antiquities of the Jews" xx. 10, § 1.] If he had no son, the office devolved upon the brother next of age: such appears to have been the practise in the Hasmonean period. In the time of Eli, however ( et seq.). According to Josephus ["Ant." xv. 3, § 1.] , birth on foreign soil was not a disqualification; but the disqualifications of , )
*Ketonet (tunic)—made of pure linen, covering the entire body from the neck to the feet, with sleeves reaching to the wrists. That of the High Priest was embroidered (, -, ; et seq. commands that the official garments worn by his predecessor shall be worn by the new incumbent while he is anointed and during the seven days of his consecration (comp.

Notes

External links

* [http://www.vbm-torah.org/parsha.61/27achare.htm The Mysterious White Garments of Yom Kippur]
* [http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1027267.html Burial artifact inscribed 'Son of High Priest' found near West Bank fence route]


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