Myōshin-ji


Myōshin-ji
Myōshin-ji
妙心寺
Myoshinji-M9707.jpg
Main buildings. Left to right:
Sanmon, Butsuden, Hattō
Information
Website http://www.myoshin.com/

Dharma Wheel.svg Portal:Buddhism

Myōshin-ji (妙心寺 Myōshin-ji?) is a temple complex in Kyoto, Japan. The Myōshin-ji school of Rinzai Zen Buddhism is the largest school in Rinzai Zen. This particular school contains within it more than three thousand[citation needed] temples throughout Japan, along with nineteen monasteries. The head temple was founded in the year 1342 by the Zen master Kanzan Egen (1277–1360). Nearly all of the buildings were destroyed in the Ōnin War in 1467; however, many of them have been rebuilt.

A difference between this and other schools of Rinzai Zen is that the Myōshin-ji school does not necessarily follow the set of established kōan for the sake of testing one's stage of enlightenment. Rather the Myōshin-ji school allows the master to specifically tailor kōan to a student's needs and background. This method diverges from the traditionally accepted canon of kōan.

Contents

Buildings

  • Important Cultural Property of Japan
    • Chokushimon - Built in 1610.
    • Sanmon - Built in 1599.
    • Butsuden - Built in 1827.
    • Hattō - Built in 1656.
    • Dai-hōjō - Built in 1654.
    • Kuri - Built in 1653.
    • Sho-hōjō - Built in 1603.
    • Yokushitsu - Built in 1656.
    • Kyōzō - Built in 1673.
    • Minamimon - Built in 1610.
    • Kitamon - Built in 1610.
    • Genkan - Built in 1654.
    • Shindō - Built in 1656.

Sub-temples

School

See also

  • List of National Treasures of Japan (crafts-others)
  • List of National Treasures of Japan (writings)
  • Goto Zuigan
  • Ichibata Yakushi Kyodan
  • For an explanation of terms concerning Japanese Buddhism, Japanese Buddhist art, and Japanese Buddhist temple architecture, see the Glossary of Japanese Buddhism.

References

External links

Coordinates: 35°01′23″N 135°43′13″E / 35.02306°N 135.72028°E / 35.02306; 135.72028



Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Myoshin-ji — Myōshin ji Myōshin ji Information Dénomination: Temple Rinzai Branche: Rinzai shū Fondé e …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Myôshin-Ji — Myōshin ji Myōshin ji Information Dénomination: Temple Rinzai Branche: Rinzai shū Fondé e …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Myôshin-ji — Myōshin ji Myōshin ji Information Dénomination: Temple Rinzai Branche: Rinzai shū Fondé e …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Myōshin-ji — Information Dénomination: Temple Rinzai Branche: Rinzai shū Fondé en …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Myoshin-ji — Tempelanlage des Myoshin ji Der Myōshin ji (jap. 妙心寺) (Shobozan Myōshin ji) ist der Haupttempel der mit Abstand größten der 15 Schulen der Rinzai Linie des japanischen Zen und damit Bezugspunkt für 19 Klöster und 3500 Tempel. Die im Nordwesten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Myōshin-ji — Tempelanlage des Myoshin ji Der Myōshin ji (jap. 妙心寺) (Shobozan Myōshin ji) ist der Haupttempel der mit Abstand größten der 15 Schulen der Rinzai Linie des japanischen Zen und damit Bezugspunkt für 19 Klöster und 3500 Tempel. Die im Nordwesten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Myoshinji — Myōshin ji Myōshin ji Information Dénomination: Temple Rinzai Branche: Rinzai shū Fondé e …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Myoshinji — Tempelanlage des Myoshin ji Der Myōshin ji (jap. 妙心寺) (Shobozan Myōshin ji) ist der Haupttempel der mit Abstand größten der 15 Schulen der Rinzai Linie des japanischen Zen und damit Bezugspunkt für 19 Klöster und 3500 Tempel. Die im Nordwesten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tetsugyu Doki — Tetsugyū Dōki (jap. 鉄牛 道機; * 25. August 1628 (Kan’ei 5/7/26[1]) in der Provinz Nagato; † 2. Oktober 1700 in Edo), war ein Mönch der Ōbaku shū des japanischen Zen Buddhismus, der die junge Organisation wesentlich mit aufbaute. Lebensweg Der Vater… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tetsugyū — Dōki (jap. 鉄牛 道機; * 25. August 1628 (Kan’ei 5/7/26[1]) in der Provinz Nagato; † 2. Oktober 1700 in Edo), war ein Mönch der Ōbaku shū des japanischen Zen Buddhismus, der die junge Organisation wesentlich mit aufbaute. Lebensweg Der Vater Tetsugyū… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.