Georges Bidault


Georges Bidault

Infobox President
name=Georges Bidault
order=President of the Provisional Government of the French Republic
nationality=French


term_start=24 June 1946
term_end=28 November 1946
predecessor=Felix Gouin
successor=Léon Blum
order2=Prime Minister of France
term_start2=28 October 1949
term_end2=2 July 1950
predecessor2=Henri Queuille
successor2=Henri Queuille
birth_date=5 October 1899
birth_place=Moulins, France
death_date=death date and age |1983|1|27|1899|10|5
death_place=Cambo-les-Bains, France
spouse=
party=MRP
religion=Roman Catholic
vicepresident=

Georges-Augustin Bidault (5 October 1899ndash 27 January 1983) was a French politician. During World War II, he was active in the French Resistance and Organisation armée secrète (OAS). After the war, he served as foreign minister and prime minister on several occasions.

Biography

Early life

Bidault was born in Moulins, Auvergne.

He studied in the Sorbonne and became a college history teacher. In 1932 he helped to found the Catholic Association of French Youth and the left-wing anti-fascist newspaper "l'Aube". He had a column in the paper and, among other things, protested against the Munich Agreement in 1938.

World War II

After the outbreak of the Second World War he joined the French army and was captured during the Fall of France and was briefly imprisoned. After his release in July 1941, he became a teacher at the Lycée du Parc in Lyon and joined the "Liberté" group of French Resistance that eventually merged with "Combat". Jean Moulin recruited him to organize an underground press and the "Combat" underground newspaper.

In his work in the resistance, he was help by his private administrative assistant Laure Diebold.

Bidault participated in the forming of the Conseil National de la Résistance and after Gestapo captured Moulin, he became its new chairman. In 1944 he formed a Resistance Charter that recommended an extensive post-war reform program. After the liberation of Paris he represented the Resistance in the victory parade. Charles de Gaulle appointed him as a foreign minister of his provisional government in 25 August. He became the founder of the Mouvement Républicain Populaire (MRP).


=Fourth Republic

After World War II, Bidault served as a foreign minister in Félix Gouin's provisional government in 1946. In 19 June 1946 National Constituent Assembly elected him as president of the provisional government. His government, formed on 15 June, was composed of socialists, communists and Bidault's own MRP. He again became the foreign minister. The government conducted elections of the National Assembly in 29 November after which Bidault resigned. His successor was Léon Blum.

Bidault served as in various French governments, first as a foreign minister under Paul Ramadier and Robert Schuman. In 1949 he became the president of the Council of Ministers (prime minister) but his cabinet lasted only 8 months. In Henri Queuille's governments in 1950-1951 he held the office of Vice-president of the Council and under Rene Pleven and Edgar Faure added a post of defense minister.

In 1952 Bidault became an honorary president of MRP. In 1 June 1953 president Vincent Auriol assigned him to form his own government but National Assembly refuse to give him the official mandate at 10 June. In 1953 Bidault became a presidential candidate but withdrew after the second round.

Fifth Republic

In April 1958 Bidault again became prime minister but did not form a cabinet and had a hand in forming the conservative Christian Democratic Movement. He also supported De Gaulle's presidency after the outbreak of the Algerian War of Independence.

In 1961 Bidault became a president of the Executive Council of the Rally for the French Algeria and resisted De Gaulle's policy of Algerian independence. He established his own National Resistance Council within the OAS. In June 1962 he was accused of conspiring against the state as the head of OAS and stripped of his parliamentary immunity. He left for an exile in Brazil. In 1967 he moved to Belgium and in 1968 he returned to France after he had received an amnesty.

Georges Bidault died in 1983 in Cambo-les-Bains.

Governments

First ministry (24 June – 16 December 1946)

*Georges Bidault - Chairman of the Provisional Government and Minister of Foreign Affairs
*Maurice Thorez - Vice Chairman of the Provisional Government
*Félix Gouin - Vice Chairman of the Provisional Government and Minister of National Defense
*Charles Tillon - Minister of Armaments
*Édouard Depreux - Minister of the Interior
*Robert Schuman - Minister of Finance
*François de Menthon - Minister of National Economy
*Marcel Paul - Minister of Industrial Production
*Ambroise Croizat - Minister of Labour and Social Security
*Pierre-Henri Teitgen - Minister of Justice
*Marcel Edmond Naegelen - Minister of National Education
*François Tanguy-Prigent - Minister of Ariculture
*Yves Farge - Minister of Supply
*Marius Moutet - Minister of Overseas France
*Jules Moch - Minister of Public Works and Transport
*Robert Prigent - Minister of Population
*François Billoux - Minister of Reconstruction and Town Planning
*Jean Letourneau - Minister of Posts
*Alexandre Varenne - Minister of State
*Francisque Gay - Minister of State

econd ministry (28 October 1949 - 7 February 1950)

*Georges Bidault - President of the Council
*Jules Moch - Vice President of the Council and Minister of the Interior
*Henri Queuille - Vice President of the Council
*Robert Schuman - Minister of Foreign Affairs
*René Pleven - Minister of National Defense
*Maurice Petsche - Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs
*Robert Lacoste - Minister of Commerce and Industry
*Pierre Segelle - Minister of Labour and Social Security
*René Mayer - Minister of Justice
*Yvon Delbos - Minister of National Education
*Louis Jacquinot - Minister of Veterans and War Victims
*Pierre Pflimlin - Minister of Agriculture
*Jean Letourneau - Minister of Overseas France
*Christian Pineau - Minister of Public Works, Transport, and Tourism
*Pierre Schneiter - Minister of Public Health and Population
*Eugène Claudius-Petit - Minister of Reconstruction and Town Planning
*Eugène Thomas - Minister of Posts
*Pierre-Henri Teitgen - Minister of State

Changes:
*2 December 1949 - Gabriel Valay succeeds Pflimlin as Minister of Agriculture

Third Ministry (7 February - 2 July 1950)

*Georges Bidault - President of the Council
*Henri Queuille - Vice President of the Council and Minister of the Interior
*Robert Schuman - Minister of Foreign Affairs
*René Pleven - Minister of National Defense
*Maurice Petsche - Minister of Finance and Economics Affairs
*Jean-Marie Louvel - Minister of Commerce and Industry
*Paul Bacon - Minister of Labour and Social Security
*René Mayer - Minister of Justice
*Yvon Delbos - Minister of National Education
*Louis Jacquinot - Minister of Veterans and War Victims
*Gabriel Valay - Minister of Agriculture
*Jean Letourneau - Minister of Overseas France
*Jacques Chastellain - Minister of Public Works, Transport, and Tourism
*Pierre Schneiter - Minister of Public Health and Population
*Eugène Claudius-Petit - Minister of Reconstruction and Town Planning
*Charles Brune - Minister of Posts
*Pierre-Henri Teitgen - Minister of State

Quotes

* "Ho Chi Minh is about to capitulate. We are going to beat him."Fact|date=January 2008


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