Norroy and Ulster King of Arms


Norroy and Ulster King of Arms
Norroy and Ulster King of Arms
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The arms of office of the Norroy and Ulster King of Arms
 
Tradition Gallo-British
Jurisdiction England north of the river Trent, Wales and Northern Ireland
Governance College of Arms
The coat of arms of Norroy King of Arms, taken from Lant's Roll c. 1595
The coat of arms of Ulster King of Arms, also taken from Lant's Roll

Norroy and Ulster King of Arms is one of the senior Officers of Arms of the College of Arms, and the junior of the two provincial Kings of Arms. The current office is the combination of two former appointments. There is a case to be made that the office of Norroy is the older of the two English territorial offices, there being a reference as early as 1276 to a "King of Heralds beyond the Trent in the North." This is the precise area to come under the later kings specifically nominated as "Norroy." The office of Ulster King of Arms (and Principal Herald of Ireland) was established in 1552 by King Edward VI to replace the post of Ireland King of Arms, which had lapsed in 1487.

In 1943, the office of Ulster was combined with that of Norroy, and the Norroy and Ulster King of Arms now has jurisdiction over the counties of Northern Ireland as well as England north of the Trent. Norroy and Ulster has also acted as Registrar and King of Arms of the Order of St Patrick since 1943, though no knights of that Order have been created since 1934, and the last surviving knight died in 1974. Heraldic matters in the Republic of Ireland are handled by the Genealogical Office.

The arms of Norroy and Ulster King of Arms date from 1980 and are blazoned Quarterly Argent and Or a Cross Gules on a Chief per pale Azure and Gules a Lion passant guardant Or crowned with an open Crown between a Fleur-de-lis and a Harp Or.

The current Norroy and Ulster King of Arms is Henry Paston-Bedingfeld, who was appointed in September 2010[1]. The previous holder, Patric Laurence Dickinson was promoted to Clarenceux King of Arms after less than five months in office.

Contents

Norroy Kings of Arms until 1943

(L) indicates the holder was Lancaster King of Arms. This title was used for the King of Arms of the northern province in the reigns of Henry IV, V and VI, instead of Norroy.

Ulster Kings of Arms until 1943

  • 1552-1566 Bartholomew W. Butler, Esq.
  • 1566-1588 Nicholas Narbon, Esq.
  • 1588-1597 Christopher Ussher, Esq.
  • 1597-1629 Daniel Molineux, Esq.
  • 1629-1633 Daniel Molineux and Adam Ussher, Esq.
  • 1633-1655 Thomas Preston, Esq.
  • 1655-1660 Sir Richard Carney
  • 1660-1683 Sir Richard St George
  • 1683-1698 Sir Richard Carney and George Wallis, Esq.
  • 1698-1722 William Hawkins, Esq.
  • 1722-1759 William Hawkins and John Hawkins, Esq.
  • 1759-1765 James McCulloch, Esq.
  • 1765-1787 William Hawkins, Esq.
  • 1787-1788 Gerald Fortescue, Esq.
  • 1788-1820 Rear Admiral Sir Chichester Fortescue
  • 1820-1853 Sir William Betham
  • 1853-1892 Sir Bernard Burke
  • 1893-1908 Sir Arthur Vicars
  • 1908-1940 Sir Nevile Rodwell Wilkinson
  • 1940-1943 Vacant, duties performed by Thomas Ulick Sadleir (Deputy Ulster)

Norroy and Ulster Kings of Arms from 1943

See also

References

  • The College of Arms, Queen Victoria Street : being the sixteenth and final monograph of the London Survey Committee, Walter H. Godfrey, assisted by Sir Anthony Wagner, with a complete list of the officers of arms, prepared by H. Stanford London, (London, 1963)
  • A History of the College of Arms &c, Mark Noble, (London, 1804)
  • List of Ulster Kings of Arms

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Norroy and Ulster King of Arms — Henry Paston Bedingfeld, Norroy and Ulster King of Arms, in der Amtsrobe des York Herald Norroy and Ulster King of Arms ist der Amtsname des rangniedrigsten der drei englischen Kings of Arms. Inhaber des Amtes ist seit dem 20. September 2010[1]… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • norroy and ulster king of arms — also norroy and ulster Usage: usually capitalized N&U&K&Arms Etymology: Ulster, former province in northern Ireland : a king of arms having jurisdiction in England north of the river Trent and in Northern Ireland compare college of arms,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • ulster king of arms — also ulster Usage: usually capitalized U&K&A : the chief officer of arms for Ireland from 1552 to 1943 compare ireland king of arms, norroy and ulster king of arms …   Useful english dictionary

  • norroy and ulster — see norroy and ulster king of arms …   Useful english dictionary

  • Norroy and Ulster — The third (English) King of *Arms, whose jurisdiction lies north of the river Trent and, latterly, Northern Ireland. [< OldFr. nord = north + roi = king] …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • King of Arms — is the senior rank of an officer of arms. In many heraldic traditions, only a king of arms has the authority to grant armorial bearings. In other traditions, the power has been delegated to other officers of similar rank.Heraldic dutiesIn England …   Wikipedia

  • norroy king of arms — Usage: usually capitalized N&K&A : one of the English kings of arms, having jurisdiction north of the river Trent and since 1943 given an expanded jurisdiction and called Norroy and Ulster King of Arms compare college of arms, clarenceux king of… …   Useful english dictionary

  • King of Arms — Wappenkönig Sir Alfred Scott Scott Gatty. Er trägt den Wappenrock des Garter Principal King of Arms, in der Hand hält er den Heroldsstab. Karikatur aus der Zeitschrift Vanity Fair, 1904. Ein Wappenkönig ist der oberste Herold seines… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • king-at-arms — king of armsˈ (sometimes king at armsˈ) noun A principal herald (those of England having the designations Garter, Clarencieux, and Norroy and Ulster (includes N Ireland), of Scotland, Lyon) • • • Main Entry: ↑king * * * king at arms «KIHNG uht… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ireland King of Arms — was the title of an officer of arms to the King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1392 until the accession of Henry VII as King of England in 1485. A king of arms is the highest of the three levels of officers of arms, and usually enjoys… …   Wikipedia


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