Sorrel


Sorrel
"Narrow-leaved sorrel" and variants redirect here. These terms may also refer to curled dock (R. crispus).
Sorrel
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Polygonaceae
Genus: Rumex
Species: R. acetosa
Binomial name
Rumex acetosa
L.
Synonyms

Rumex stenophyllus Ledeb.

Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb that is cultivated as a garden herb or leaf vegetable (pot herb). Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock.

Contents

Growth

Sorrel is a slender plant about 60 cm high, with roots that run deep into the ground, as well as juicy stems and edible, oblong leaves. The lower leaves are 7 to 15 cm in length, slightly arrow-shaped at the base, with very long petioles. The upper ones are sessile, and frequently become crimson. The leaves are eaten by the larvae of several species of Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) including the blood-vein moth.

Sorrel soup with egg and croutons; Polish cuisine.


Characteristics

It has whorled spikes of reddish-green flowers, which bloom in summer, becoming purplish. The stamens and pistils are on different plants (dioecious); the ripe seeds are brown and shining.

Uses

Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salads; they have a flavour that is similar to kiwifruit or sour wild strawberries. The plant's sharp taste is due to oxalic acid, which is a poison. In small quantities sorrel is harmless; in large quantities it can be fatal.[1]

In northern Nigeria, sorrel is known as yakuwa or sure (pronounced suuray) in Hausa or karassu in Kanuri. It is also used in stews usually in addition to spinach. In some Hausa communities, it is steamed and made into salad using kuli-kuli (traditional roasted peanut cakes with oil extracted), salt, pepper, onion and tomatoes. The recipe varies according to different levels of household income. A drink called solo is made from a decoction of the plant calyx.

In Romania, wild or garden sorrel, known as măcriş or ştevie, is used to make sour soups, stewed with spinach, added fresh to lettuce and spinach in salads or over open sandwiches.

In Russia and Ukraine it is called shchavel' (щавель) and is used to make soup called shav. It is used as a soup ingredient in other countries, too (e.g., Lithuania, where it is known as rūgštynė).

In Hungary this is known as sóska [ pronounced Shoshka]. It is called kuzu kulağı ("lamb's ear") in Turkish. In Polish it is called szczaw (pronounced /ʂʈʂaf/).

Among Northern Sami it is known as juopmu and was traditionally added to reindeer milk as a flavoring and preservative.

In parts of Belgium it is served mixed with mashed potatoes, or as part of a traditional dish containing eel and other green herbs.

In rural Greece it is used with spinach, leeks, and chard in spanakopita.

Subspecies

Several subspecies have been named; not all are cultivated:

  • Rumex acetosa ssp. acetosa
  • Rumex acetosa ssp. ambiguus
  • Rumex acetosa ssp. arifolius
  • Rumex acetosa ssp. hibernicus
  • Rumex acetosa ssp. hirtulus
  • Rumex acetosa ssp. vinealis

References

  1. ^ "Sorrel-Uses And Side Effects". Womens-health-club.com. http://www.womens-health-club.com/herbs/sorrel.htm. Retrieved 2011-09-21. 

See also


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sorrel — Sor rel, n. [F. surelle, fr. sur sour, fr. OHG. s?r sour. See {Sour}.] (Bot.) One of various plants having a sour juice; especially, a plant of the genus {Rumex}, as {Rumex Acetosa}, {Rumex Acetosella}, etc. [1913 Webster] {Mountain sorrel}. (Bot …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sorrel — Ⅰ. sorrel [1] ► NOUN ▪ an edible plant of the dock family with arrow shaped leaves and a bitter flavour. ORIGIN Old French sorele; related to SOUR(Cf. ↑sourness). Ⅱ. sorrel [2] ► NOUN …   English terms dictionary

  • Sorrel — Sor rel, a. [F. saur, saure, OF. sor, sore, probably of Teutonic origin; cf. D. zoor dry, LG. soor; the meaning probably coming from the color of dry leaves. See {Sear}, a., and cf. {Sorel}.] Of a yellowish or redish brown color; as, a sorrel… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sorrel — ist der Name: einer Pflanze, siehe Roselle (Pflanze) eines Pferdes, siehe Little Sorrel Siehe auch: Sorel Sorrell Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsk …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • sorrel — sorrel1 [sôr′əl, sär′əl] n. [ME sorel < OFr surele < Frank * sur; akin to OHG sur, SOUR] 1. any of various short, coarse weeds (genus Rumex) of the buckwheat family, with sour, edible leaves: see DOCK3 2. WOOD SORREL sorrel2 [sôr′əl,… …   English World dictionary

  • Sorrel — Sor rel, n. A yellowish or redish brown color. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sorrel — f English: from the plant, so named in the Middle Ages from Old French surele, apparently a derivative of sur sour (of Germanic origin), alluding to the acid taste of its leaves. The spellings Sorrell and Sorell also occur; the rare Sorel is used …   First names dictionary

  • sorrel — sorrel1 /sawr euhl, sor /, n. 1. light reddish brown. 2. a horse of this color, often with a light colored mane and tail. adj. 3. of the color sorrel. [1400 50; late ME < OF sorel, equiv. to sor brown ( < Gmc) + el dim. suffix; see ELLE] sorrel2… …   Universalium

  • sorrel — jamaikinė kinrožė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Dedešvinių šeimos daržovinis, maistinis, pluoštinis, prieskoninis, vaistinis augalas (Hibiscus sabdariffa), paplitęs atogrąžose. Iš jo gaminami maisto priedai (kvėpikliai), gėrimai.… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • sorrel — valgomoji rūgštynė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Rūgtinių šeimos daržovinis, maistinis, vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Rumex acetosa), paplitęs Europoje, Azijoje ir šiaurės Afrikoje. atitikmenys: lot. Rumex acetosa angl. garden sorrel;… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)


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