Rose


Rose
Rose
Rosa rubiginosa
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Rosoideae
Genus: Rosa
L.
Species

See List of Rosa species

Synonyms
  • Hulthemia Dumort.
  • ×Hulthemosa Juz. (Hulthemia × Rosa)

A rose is a woody perennial of the genus Rosa, within the family Rosaceae. There are over 100 species. They form a group of erect shrubs, and climbing or trailing plants, with stems that are often armed with sharp prickles. Flowers are large and showy, in colours ranging from white through yellows and reds. Most species are native to Asia, with smaller numbers native to Europe, North America, and northwest Africa. Species, cultivars and hybrids are all widely grown for their beauty and fragrance. Rose plants range in size from compact, miniature roses, to climbers that can reach 7 meters in height. Different species hybridize easily, and this has been used in the development of the wide range of garden roses.[1]

The name rose comes from French, itself from Latin rosa, which was perhaps borrowed from Oscan, from Greek ρόδον rhodon (Aeolic βρόδον wrodon), related to Old Persian wrd-, Avestan varəda, Sogdian ward, Parthian wâr, Armenian vard.[2][3]

Contents

Botany

Cross-section through a developing rose hip
Exterior view of rose buds
Rose leaflets

The leaves are borne alternately on the stem. In most species they are 5 to 15 centimetres (2.0 to 5.9 in) long, pinnate, with (3–) 5–9 (–13) leaflets and basal stipules; the leaflets usually have a serrated margin, and often a few small prickles on the underside of the stem. Most roses are deciduous but a few (particularly from South east Asia) are evergreen or nearly so.

The hybrid garden rose "Amber Flush"

The flowers of most species have five petals, with the exception of Rosa sericea, which usually has only four. Each petal is divided into two distinct lobes and is usually white or pink, though in a few species yellow or red. Beneath the petals are five sepals (or in the case of some Rosa sericea, four). These may be long enough to be visible when viewed from above and appear as green points alternating with the rounded petals. There are multiple superior ovaries that develop into achenes.[4] Roses are insect-pollinated in nature.

The aggregate fruit of the rose is a berry-like structure called a rose hip. Many of the domestic cultivars do not produce hips, as the flowers are so tightly petalled that they do not provide access for pollination. The hips of most species are red, but a few (e.g. Rosa pimpinellifolia) have dark purple to black hips. Each hip comprises an outer fleshy layer, the hypanthium, which contains 5–160 "seeds" (technically dry single-seeded fruits called achenes) embedded in a matrix of fine, but stiff, hairs. Rose hips of some species, especially the Dog Rose (Rosa canina) and Rugosa Rose (Rosa rugosa), are very rich in vitamin C, among the richest sources of any plant. The hips are eaten by fruit-eating birds such as thrushes and waxwings, which then disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some birds, particularly finches, also eat the seeds.

Rose thorns are actually prickles - outgrowths of the epidermis.

While the sharp objects along a rose stem are commonly called "thorns", they are technically prickles — outgrowths of the epidermis (the outer layer of tissue of the stem). (True thorns, as produced by e.g. Citrus or Pyracantha, are modified stems, which always originate at a node and which have nodes and internodes along the length of the thorn itself.) Rose prickles are typically sickle-shaped hooks, which aid the rose in hanging onto other vegetation when growing over it. Some species such as Rosa rugosa and Rosa pimpinellifolia have densely packed straight spines, probably an adaptation to reduce browsing by animals, but also possibly an adaptation to trap wind-blown sand and so reduce erosion and protect their roots (both of these species grow naturally on coastal sand dunes). Despite the presence of prickles, roses are frequently browsed by deer. A few species of roses have only vestigial prickles that have no points.

Species

The genus Rosa is subdivided into four subgenera:

  • Hulthemia (formerly Simplicifoliae, meaning "with single leaves") containing one or two species from southwest Asia, R. persica and Rosa berberifolia which are the only roses without compound leaves or stipules.
  • Hesperrhodos (from the Greek for "western rose") contains Rosa minutifolia and Rosa stellata, from North America.
  • Platyrhodon (from the Greek for "flaky rose", referring to flaky bark) with one species from east Asia, Rosa roxburghii.
  • Rosa (the type subgenus) containing all the other roses. This subgenus is subdivided into 11 sections.
    • Banksianae - white and yellow flowered roses from China.
    • Bracteatae - three species, two from China and one from India.
    • Caninae - pink and white flowered species from Asia, Europe and North Africa.
    • Carolinae - white, pink, and bright pink flowered species all from North America.
    • Chinensis - white, pink, yellow, red and mixed-color roses from China and Burma.
    • Gallicanae - pink to crimson and striped flowered roses from western Asia and Europe.
    • Gymnocarpae - one species in western North America (Rosa gymnocarpa), others in east Asia.
    • Laevigatae - a single white flowered species from China
    • Pimpinellifoliae - white, pink, bright yellow, mauve and striped roses from Asia and Europe.
    • Rosa (syn. sect. Cinnamomeae) - white, pink, lilac, mulberry and red roses from everywhere but North Africa.
    • Synstylae - white, pink, and crimson flowered roses from all areas.
Rose-picking in the Rose Valley near the town of Kazanlak, 1870s, engraving by F. Kanitz

Uses

Roses are best known as ornamental plants grown for their flowers in the garden and sometimes indoors. They have been also used for commercial perfumery and commercial cut flower crops. Some are used as landscape plants, for hedging and for other utilitarian purposes such as game cover and slope stabilization. They also have minor medicinal uses.

Ornamental plants

The majority of ornamental roses are hybrids that were bred for their flowers. A few, mostly species roses are grown for attractive or scented foliage (such as Rosa glauca and Rosa rubiginosa), ornamental thorns (such as Rosa sericea) or for their showy fruit (such as Rosa moyesii).

Hybrid Tea cultivar 'Mrs. Herbert Stevens'

Ornamental roses have been cultivated for millennia, with the earliest known cultivation known to date from at least 500 BC in Mediterranean countries, Persia, and China.[5] Many thousands of rose hybrids and cultivars have been bred and selected for garden use as flowering plants. Most are double-flowered with many or all of the stamens having mutated into additional petals.

In the early 19th century the Empress Josephine of France patronized the development of rose breeding at her gardens at Malmaison. As long ago as 1840 a collection numbering over one thousand different cultivars, varieties and species was possible when a rosarium was planted by Loddiges nursery for Abney Park Cemetery, an early Victorian garden cemetery and arboretum in England.

A few species and hybrids are grown for non-floral ornamental use. Among these are those grown for prominent hips, such as the flagon shaped hips of Rosa moyesii. Sometimes even the thorns can be treated as an attraction or curiosity, such as with Rosa sericea.

Cut flowers

Bouquet of pink roses

Roses are a popular crop for both domestic and commercial cut flowers. Generally they are harvested and cut when in bud, and held in refrigerated conditions until ready for display at their point of sale.

In temperate climates, cut roses are often grown in glasshouses, and in warmer countries they may also be grown under cover in order to ensure that the flowers are not damaged by weather and that pests and disease control can be carried out effectively. Significant quantities are grown in some tropical countries, and these are shipped by air to markets across the world.[6]

Perfume

Rose perfumes are made from attar of roses or rose oil, which is a mixture of volatile essential oils obtained by steam distilling the crushed petals of roses. An associated product is rose water which is used for cooking, cosmetics, medicine and in religious practices. The production technique originated in Persia then spread through Arabia and India, and more recently into eastern Europe. In Bulgaria, Iran and Germany, damask roses (Rosa damascena 'Trigintipetala') are used. In other parts of the world Rosa centifolia is commonly used. The oil is transparent pale yellow or yellow-grey in colour. 'Rose Absolute' is solvent-extracted with hexane and produces a darker oil, dark yellow to orange in colour. The weight of oil extracted is about one three-thousandth to one six-thousandth of the weight of the flowers; for example, about two thousand flowers are required to produce one gram of oil.

Geraniol (C10H18O)

The main constituents of attar of roses are the fragrant alcohols geraniol and l-citronellol; and rose camphor, an odourless paraffin. β-Damascenone is also a significant contributor to the scent.

Rose water, made as a byproduct of rose oil production, is widely used in Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine. In France there is much use of rose syrup, most commonly made from an extract of rose petals. In the United States, this French rose syrup is used to make rose scones and marshmallows.

Rose hips

The rose hip, the fruit of some species, is used as a minor source of Vitamin C.

Rose hips are occasionally made into jam, jelly, and marmalade, or are brewed for tea, primarily for their high vitamin C content. They are also pressed and filtered to make rose hip syrup. Rose hips are also used to produce Rose hip seed oil, which is used in skin products and some makeup products.

Medicine

The fruits of many species have significant levels of vitamins and have been used as a food supplement (see previous section). Many roses have been used in herbal and folk medicines. Rosa chinensis has long been used in Chinese traditional medicine. This and other species have been used for stomach problems, and are being investigated for controlling cancer growth.[7]

Culture

Art

Roses are a favored subject in art and therefore used in various artistic disciplines. They appear in portraits, illustrations, on stamps, as ornaments or as architectural elements. The Luxembourg born Belgian artist and botanist Pierre-Joseph Redouté is known for his detailed watercolours of flowers, particularly roses.

Renoir's painting of cabbage roses, Roses in a vase

Henri Fantin-Latour was also a prolific painter of still life, particularly flowers including roses. The Rose 'Fantin-Latour' was named after the artist.

Other impressionists including Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne and Pierre-Auguste Renoir have paintings of roses among their works.

Symbolism

The long cultural history of the rose has led to it being used often as a symbol.

Pests and diseases

Wild roses are host plants for a number of pests and diseases. Many of these are also shared with other plants, including especially other genera of the Rosaceae.

Cultivated roses are often subject to severe damage from insect, arachnid and fungal pests and diseases. In many cases they cannot be usefully grown without regular treatment to control these problems.

See also

References

  1. ^ "rose (plant) - Britannica Online Encyclopedia". Britannica.com. 2007-11-19. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/509710/rose. Retrieved 2009-12-07. 
  2. ^ American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, s.v. "rose."
  3. ^ Iranica.com
  4. ^ Mabberley, D.J. 1997. The plant book: A portable dictionary of the vascular plants. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  5. ^ Jack Goody. The culture of flowers. Cambridge University Press, 1993
  6. ^ [www.foodnet.cgiar.org/market/Uganda/reports/Roses.PDF FOODNET Uganda 2009. Commercialisation bulletin: Fresh cut roses]
  7. ^ http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rosa%20chinensis

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • rose — rose …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • rosé — rosé …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • rosé — rosé …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • rose — 1. (rô z ) s. f. 1°   Fleur odoriférante, ordinairement d un rouge un peu pâle, et qui croît sur un arbuste épineux. Rose simple ou rose sauvage. Rose du Bengale. Rose des quatre saisons ou de Damas. •   Mais elle était du monde où les plus… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Rose — Rose, n. [AS. rose, L. rosa, probably akin to Gr. ?, Armor. vard, OPer. vareda; and perhaps to E. wort: cf. F. rose, from the Latin. Cf. {Copperas}, {Rhododendron}.] 1. A flower and shrub of any species of the genus {Rosa}, of which there are… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rose — ROSE. s. f. Sorte de fleur odoriferante, qui est ordinairement d un beau rouge un peu pasle, & qui croist sur un arbrisseau plein de petites espines. Rose simple, ou rose d eglantier. rose double. rose à cent feuilles. rose de Hollande. rose… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Rose d'or — de Minucchio da Siena (1330), Musée national du Moyen Âge La Rose d or est un ornement béni par le pape, destiné à honorer des souverains ou des sanctuaires catholiques. Comme son nom l indique, il représente une rose, un bouquet de roses ou un… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Rose — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda El nombre de Rose puede referirse a lo siguiente: Rose: primer sencillo de Anna Tsuchiya. Rose: personaje del manga y anime, Bleach. Botánicos y sus abreviaturas científicas A.Rose August David Friedrich Carl Rose… …   Wikipedia Español

  • ROSE (J.) — Jean ROSE 1915 1992 Lorsque Jean Rose prend, en 1965, la direction du palais de la Découverte, l’institution ne lui est pas étrangère. Docteur ès sciences, ancien directeur du laboratoire de cristallographie appliquée du Centre national de la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

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  • rose — (n.) O.E. rose, from L. rosa (Cf. It., Sp. rosa, Fr. rose; also source of Du. roos, Ger. Rose, Swed. ros, etc.), probably via Italian and Greek dialects from Gk. rhodon rose (Aeolic wrodon), ultimately from Pers. *vrda . But Cf. Tucker: The rose… …   Etymology dictionary


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