Sammarinese lira


Sammarinese lira

Infobox Currency
currency_name_in_local = lira sanmarinese it icon
image_1 = San Marino 500 lire(2).jpg
image_title_1 = 500 samamrinese lire
iso_code = SML
using_countries = San Marino, Italy, Vatican City
euro_replace_non_cash = 1 January 1999
euro_replace_cash = 1 January 2002
ERM_since = 13 March 1979, 25 November 1996 1
ERM_withdraw = 16 September 1992 (Black Wednesday)
ERM_fixed_rate_since = 31 December 1998
euro_replace_non_cash = 1 January 1999
euro_replace_cash = 1 January 2002
ERM_fixed_rate = 1936.27 lire
subunit_ratio_1 = 1/100
subunit_name_1 = centesimo
symbol = ₤, £ or L
plural = lire
plural_subunit_1 = centesimi
frequently_used_coins = 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000 lire
rarely_used_coins = 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 lire
obsolete_notice = Y
footnotes =

  1. indirectly (1:1 peg to ITL)
The lira (plural "lire") was the currency of San Marino from the 1860s until the introduction of the euro in 2002. It was equivalent to the Italian lira. Italian coins and banknotes and Vatican City coins were legal tender in San Marino, whilst Sammarinese coins, minted in Rome, were legal tender throughout Italy, as well as in the Vatican City.

Coins

San Marino's first coins were copper 5 centesimi, issued in 1864. These were followed by copper 10 centesimi, first issued in 1875. Although these copper coins were last issued in 1894, silver 50 centesimi, 1, 2 and 5 lire were issued in 1898, with the 1 and 2 lire also minted in 1906.

The Sammarinese coinage recommenced in 1931, with silver 5, 10 and 20 lire, to which bronze 5 and 10 centesimi were added in 1935. These coins were issued until 1938.

In 1972, San Marino began issuing coins again, in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 lire, all of which were struck to the same specifications as the corresponding Italian coins. 200 lire coins were added in 1978, followed by bimetallic 500 and 1000 lire in 1982 and 1997, respectively. All of these modern issues have changed design every year.

ee also

* San Marino euro coins

References

*

External links

* [http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/Sanmarino.html All coins from 1972 to 2000]


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